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review 2018-09-20 06:38
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
The Princess Bride: An Illustrated Edition of S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure - William Goldman,Michael Manomivibul

I did not think I would have to start this review with a trigger warning, of all books, but here we are. Trigger Warning: Suicide (There is a line in this that really rubbed me the wrong way.) Fat shaming a child.

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About the suicide, the line is "She had never seriously contemplated suicide before. Oh, of course she’d thought about it; every girl does from time to time. But never seriously. To her quiet surprise, she found it was going to be the easiest thing in the world."

 

Every girl does? What is that even supposed to mean? This line makes suicide sound like a silly fad, a phase that "every" girl goes through, but only when she is feeling emotional.

Every few chapters, the author, William Goldman (who is pretending not to be the author) breaks the fourth wall and talks about his life and why he cut this and that from the "original" novel. In a lot of these fourth wall breaking segments, he talks about his "fat" son and "cold" wife, he even talks about almost being tempted to cheat on his wife. I get that he is trying to go for a style and pass this novel off as something some great S. Morgenstern wrote, but what is the point in talking so horrible about your son and wife? Is that really how you treated your family? Please tell me those parts were fiction, too.

I skipped the last part "Buttercup's Baby." So in that sense, I DNF'd this book. This is a rare case where the movie is better. Oh sure, I liked this book. It had the same heart as the movie, but Goldman's interruptions really ruined my enjoyment. I don't think I want to read anything else by him.

Don't fat shame your children, please. Don't body shame, in general! This line comes from the book: "Oh. Daddy, I'm ugly and I've got no friends and all the girls laugh at me and make fun because I'm so fat."
I had to blink back tears myself -- because it was all true, y'see." (Goldman talking to his son.) Why is this even relevant to The Princess Bride? I don't get it! This is gross. Just gross.

I have a bad relationship with food because all through my childhood, my stepdad mocked my weight, doctors put me on diet pills at 16...etc. Guess what, I look back and I wasn't even obese, bigger than the average kid my age, maybe, but not big enough for diet pills, or big enough to "diet". What is "too big" and what is normal? As a child, I shouldn't have been thinking I was wrong because I had a few more pounds than other classmates. Now I'm an adult with body image issues, weight "problems", depression, anxiety and I always put myself down, hate on myself.

Thinness does not equal happiness. Fatness does not equal sadness. Goldman said that now his son is ripped and gorgeous and now he is popular. What kind of message does this send to anyone?

Also, I want to point out, I did not really care about the way Fezzik is treated as not smart just because he is a large guy.

Sorry I went on a rant here.

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text 2018-09-20 03:53
Reading progress update: I've read 328 out of 496 pages.
The Princess Bride: An Illustrated Edition of S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure - William Goldman,Michael Manomivibul
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text 2018-09-19 03:35
Reading progress update: I've read 272 out of 496 pages.
The Princess Bride: An Illustrated Edition of S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure - William Goldman,Michael Manomivibul

I will tell you what, I do not like William Goldman, the author (who is pretending not to be...) The parts where he talks about his "fat" son and his "cold" wife...etc. It is gross. Why is it needed in this book? Is that how you truly treated your family? Please tell me that part is fiction, too. I grew up with my stepdad always mocking my weight... you can imagine how that messes with your head, even as an adult.

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text 2018-09-18 09:50
Reading progress update: I've read 110 out of 496 pages.
The Princess Bride: An Illustrated Edition of S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure - William Goldman,Michael Manomivibul

I'm reading the kindle verson, which I beleive is still $2.99!!

 

I like it so far. Of course, I know the story (from the movie, and I think I might have read some of the book as a kid.)

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review 2018-03-25 20:44
Magic
Magic - William Goldman

Corky continued to breathe heavily.

“You can talk now, say whatever you want, as long as I want you to, when I’m bored, we’ll play some more.”

“Lis—”

“—I’m bored, let’s play, get the knives.”

“Knives?”

“The Duker’s, go get ’em.”

Corky went to the kitchenette, brought out the knives.

“What do you think we ought to do with ’em?” Fats said.

“Want me to whittle something?”

“Maybe.”

I vividly remember watching the 1978 film based on this book starring Anthony Hopkins for the first time in the 1990s, and the second time about ten years later, and it is incredible that it has taken me this long to read the actual book. 

 

There is something odd about the book. It is as creepy and gripping as the film, but I can't say that I enjoyed the writing. The writing seemed somewhat choppy. However, this is a pulp fiction novel and it does fit in with my expectations of what a mid-1970s pulp thriller / horror novel would read like. It would be interesting to read Goldman's Marathon Man at some point just to find out if his style varies in a different story of a similar genre.

 

Still, despite the disjointed narration, it was a pleasant surprise to find that Peggy, the "love interest", was an interesting character that had more to her than physical attraction. I liked how she got a voice in the book, even tho she was not the focus of the story. 

“Get this please: I’m leaving, and you’re leaving, so it happens we’ll go together but I’m not running out on Duke because he’s at the bottom, I’m going because I’m at the bottom, so it happens by coincidence that you and I are heading the same direction, out, and if it works that we stay headed that same direction, terrific, but if it doesn’t, the world’s not ending for me, which is what I was afraid of, going off and leaving one guy and then getting dumped by another and not having the first one around to take me back but that’s no problem, not anymore, ’cause if I get dumped, I’m not coming back.”

I am not even sure why I was so surprised to find that her character had a mind of her own. Maybe it was my bias with respect to books written in the 70s, maybe something else, but I enjoyed the little sub-plot that Peggy's thoughts created.

“… huh …?”

“… it was you all the time …”

“… you sure …?”

“… trust me for a while …”

 

 

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