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text 2017-03-23 13:08
3 ways to put quotes in the spotlight on your blog

I love quotations because it is a joy to find thoughts

one might have beautifully expressed...

Marlene Dietrich

If you're a fan of quotes too let's have a look at several ways to highlight the precious words on your book blog.

 

1. Write a quote post

This type of post is one among five visible on the wooden bar on the top of your Dashboard. The quote post let you publish a quotation with a source and /or a book cover, you can also mark it as a review and add tags.

 

 

2. Add a blockquote in your text

In order to highlight the the words you cherish the most, make them stand out in your review or text post. Just mark the words and click the quotation mark on the top border of the editor box and the quote will receive a central placing in your writing. You can switch on/off the blockquote option for the paragraph any time.

 

 

3. Use the Quote Widget

If you've recently published a quote you adore make it more visible by using the quote widget. You can use the widget on your BookLikes blog page as well as on any other webpage you have.

 

To create a widget with your most recent quote post go to Goodies/Widgets (the main menu -> Goodies -> Widgets), find the Quote Widget spot, adjust the widget if necessary and copy the code.

 

 

If you wish to add the widget to your BookLikes blog, paste the code in the Widget Area in the customization tab (follow the instruction under the widget), and if you want to add it to your other page, just copy/paste the widget code into your other website's code.

 

 

 

What's your favorite quote? We think that the following ones are very powerful and worth remembering:

 

You are your best thing

Beloved, Toni Morrison

 

We were the people who were not in the papers.

We lived in the blank white spaces at the edges of print.

It gave us more freedom. 

We lived in the gaps between the stories.

The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood

 

P.S.

Let's share book love!

February was all about love, book love. But let's face it, in book lover's world the book affection lasts 24/7 all year long. If you've missed BookLikes bloggers book love stories, here is your chance to sneek peek into the pieces once again. Read all readers' testimonies and get the insights of book bloggers' reading preferences and favorite genres.

 

We'd love to read your Book Love Story! Tell the world why you love reading books and we'll be more than happy to spread the word, feature and interview you on the BookLikes blog! Remember to add why I love tag to your post :) continue reading

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text 2017-03-20 12:05
Cover Reveal - Writing My Own Destiny

 

 

Blurb:

 
 
‘We love Aussies,’ they said, ‘the readers will eat you up’.

Those seven little words got me on a plane to the USA for the ‘Raunchy with a touch of sexiness – Valentine’s Day Author Event’ in Miami.

I’m a romance author. A girl with a vivid imagination, and an overactive sex drive. 

Oh, and yes I’m Australian

When I agreed the so-called love of my life had just walked out on me, leaving me with two little girls. All I wanted was a little fun and some no strings attached fun while I was there. 

It would be my very own ‘what happens in Miami, stays in Miami’.

Unless I fall in love with an American....

There’s no such thing as a happily ever after in real life.
 
 
 
Add to your TBR: http://bit.ly/2mRrOrh
 
 
 
 

About Stacey Johnston:

 

Stacey Johnston was raised in Perth, Western Australia. She is a wife and mum to four children.

Having been an avid reader most of her life, Stacey finds herself most at ease when she can lose herself in stories of romance and mystery.

Stacey has a creative way of bringing suspense into her stories which keeps her reader hanging onto every word to find out how it ends.
 

Follow Stacey Johnston:

 

Instagram: @author_stacey
Facebook Group: http://bit.ly/2eVi0KK
 
 
 
 
 

 

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text 2017-03-16 04:40
New Voices - the beginning of a new direction

Further to the new direction in my writing career.

 

Okay, so you’re saying my writing career had no direction before so how can I have a new one?

 

Well, maybe having no direction is a direction.

 

Too Zen for you?

 

How about: If you write a book and nobody reads it have you really written a book? That one’s been driving me crazy since, well, since I wrote a book and nobody read it.

 

Before you? me? we? all of us? get too hung up (do people still say that?) on these esoteric ruminations let me continue.

 

All of my book marketing has been so far done online. I blog, I Tweet, I post on my Facebook page, I send out promotional newsletters to my Advance Reading Team, I review books, I’ve even gone so far as to join and contribute to online reading/writing groups.

 

And it’s got me_______. (You fill in the blank)

 

This direction(?) has been macro – my books are available through Amazon, Apple, Kobo, Barnes and Noble, Library Direct, OverDrive and a few more in Canada, United States, United Kingdom, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Brazil, Mexico, Australia, Japan and India. They’re available digitally as epub, mobi, pdf, online reader and more, suitable to most reading devices including your cellphone as well as in paperback in the UK, USA and Canada.

 

My new direction will be micro – I’ll sell actual books to real people face to face.

 

My first experience with this will be on March 27, 2017 at the Vancouver Public Library where I’ll be reading my work along with five other writers in their “New Voices” series. (How after seven years, seven novels and two plays I can be considered a “new voice” says something – what I’m not sure.)

 

The event is from 7 to 8:30 pm and our host will even provide a table for us to display and sell our books. I don’t know about the rest of the participants, but I’m taking advantage of the table and might even break off from my reading prematurely if I see someone in the audience interested in the merchandise.

 

Having been a salesman all my life I’m not the least bit intimidated.

 

So, I’ve crunched the numbers taking into consideration the price of my books, the exchange rate, shipping and tax and if I sell a book for $15 it’s $4 less than it can be purchased from Amazon and I can still make some money.

 

Enough, I hope, to at least cover the outrageous cost of parking downtown.

 

This is marginally better than selling my books at a flea market or garage sale, but if the world doesn’t want to buy them maybe the neighbourhood does.

 

I’m not afraid of taking chances, going in a new direction, and maybe, likely, failing. I never know where things will lead what’s important to me is to keep moving forward.

 

Well, at least to keep moving.

 

One thing’s for certain, if I do nothing, that’s what will happen.

 

Stay calm, be brave, watch for the signs.

 

30

 

Find reviews, blurbs and buy links to my seven novels and two plays at http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU

 

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review 2017-03-15 01:51
Perfect Class Book
Regarding the Fountain: A Tale, in Letters, of Liars and Leaks - Kate Klise,M. Sarah Klise

This book is filled with all kinds of opportunities for teaching! There are science facts, letter writing, and letters about places from all over the world! This book has too much information to share it all! Using this book as a class reading will open up the possibilities for the teacher to teach about:

- Letter writing and writing in general

- Geography/History

- Different vocabulary words

- All types of word play

- Many different resources for text (newspaper, postcard, letter, telegram, etc)

- Creativity and design (the students could design their own crazy water fountain)

 

Reading Level: 

- Guided Reading= S

- Lexile = 830L

- Grades 4-5

- Chapter Book (138 Pages)

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review 2017-03-11 20:24
Black Wave, Michelle Tea
Black Wave - Michelle Tea

The more I read (and watch movies and TV), the more I value encountering something unlike anything else I ever have before. Black Wave, by Michelle Tea, immersed me in a world new to me in several ways.

 

Though there are occasionally individual queer characters in the books I read, I haven't read much queer lit where a larger community is represented, especially queer women. Black Wave is set in San Francisco in the 90s at the start, an alternative past where gentrification has strangled most of the culture(s) from the city. In addition, the world appears to be ending due to advanced climate change: it's dangerous to be out in the sun even incidentally, the ocean is a trash wave, many animals are extinct, and invasive species have overtaken the dying native flora. In other words, the environment's death mirrors a cultural and, as is soon apparent, a personal one.

 

The protagonist, Michelle (like the author), is in her later twenties, and is the kind of addict who tells herself she's not because she doesn't shoot heroin but snorts it and is able to keep her job at a bookstore. She falls in love (or becomes infatuated) easily and hooks up with many of the women who come into her orbit, despite being in a "steady" relationship with a partner more stable than she is. At one point the point of view shifts from Michelle's to her girlfriend's, who thinks she's a sociopath.

 

That feels pretty accurate, but one of the amazing things about Black Wave is that despite Michelle's objectively unlikable character, I still felt very much invested in her. In part this is due to the humor and energy of the writing. For example:

 

Michelle seemed more like some sort of compulsively rutting land mammal, a chimera of dog in heat and black widow, a sex fiend that kills its mate. Or else she was merely a sociopath. She was like the android from Blade Runner who didn’t know it was bad to torture a tortoise. She had flipped [her girlfriend] Andy onto her belly in the Armageddon sun and left her there, fins flapping.

 

I may also personally respond to Michelle because she's a writer, one who's even published and had a sort of local fame. Around the midpoint of the book when she moves to L.A., the narrative is deconstructed as she attempts to write a new book. It becomes clear that not everything we've read so far is as it happened. Another aspect I liked is that somehow this sudden shift doesn't feel like a trick as can happen in many modernist and post-modernist writing and metafiction. How and why I don't know, but after some minor readjustment on my part as a reader, I was still invested.

 

I've often noted what a structure fanatic I am, and the last major selling point of Black Wave is the way it beautifully spins out in the last third.

 

Tangents were Michelle’s favorite part of writing, each one a declaration of agency: I know I was going over there but now I’m going over here, don’t be so uptight about it, just come along. A tangent was a fuckup, a teenage runaway. It was a road trip with a full tank of gas. You can’t get lost if you don’t have anywhere to be. This was writing for Michelle: rule free, glorious, sprawling.

 

As the world ends, people begin dreaming vividly and lucidly about others who exist in the real world, all over the world. They're dreams of connection and love where identity is fluid, and some begin living in them, like Michelle's bosses at the bookstore who hand over the business to her. So the world ends, but somehow Michelle's in a good place, and so was I.

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