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text 2018-09-13 03:20
Halloween Bingo - New Release
The Perfect Mother - Aimee Molloy

The Perfect Mother is a suspense novel published in 2018 about a woman whose baby is kidnapped when she leaves him with a babysitter to go out for drinks with a group of friends from a new mothers group. I'm using it for the New Release square.

 

 

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review 2018-08-24 03:13
Slow suspense building to a superb ending
The Perfect Mother - Aimee Molloy

Don’t be overwhelmed by the substantial amount of characters in this book. Some are just stand by, you’ll want to focus on: Francie, Colette, Nell, and Winnie. (Maybe Token on the side but he’s more a supportive role) it may seem haphazard and all over the place which is why it’s best to just focus on these four moms.

 

The chapters switch from different points of view and there’s that one lone chapter that’s presented in first person. It’s a mystery as to who that is until much later, but it certainly does keep you guessing on who that person could be. It may seem obvious at first and during the reading you feel so sure you know who that is and what’s behind the entire story but the blind side moment comes fast in the last few chapters and you’re left with a shock.

 

The plot slowly builds to a good mystery and suspense. The thrilling bits get you at the end. It’s a satisfying read, the characters grate on you (Francie and Nell are the ones I disliked the most), but it’s the suspense and the ‘keeping you guessing’ bits that get the reading going.

 

So although it may seem like it’s all over the place, give the book a chance and read. It’s well worth it with the superb ending.

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review 2018-02-05 03:03
The Perfect Mother by Aimee Molloy
The Perfect Mother - Aimee Molloy

A special thank you to Edelweiss and Harper for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

 

A mommy group dubbed as the May Mothers meet at a park twice a week to discuss being new mothers, swap stories, alleviate their anxieties, and offer advice and support.

 

It is one of the hottest summers on record.  As a break from the heat, and the babies, the members decide a night out is in order at the local hip bar.  Winnie, a single mother, had never left her six-week-old infant, Midas.  One of the May Mothers offers up her babysitter so that Winnie can join them, insisting everything would be fine.  On this stifling Fourth of July, something goes terrifyingly wrong: one of the babies is abducted right from his home.  Midas is missing and the police are asking disturbing questions that are putting Winnie's private life on display and the media can't get enough.

 

None of the other members are particularly close to the guarded Winnie, yet three of them will go to great lengths to help find her baby.  Secrets are exposes, relationships are tested, and the mothers are scrutinized.  

 

All I can say is, what a surprise!  Apparently this book will be adapted for the big screen and will star Kerry Washington (um...yes, please).  Molloy's novel is also eagerly anticipated as one of this coming summer's must reads and I would definitely recommend it as well.    

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review 2015-02-28 22:51
Rosewater (Movie Tie-in Edition): A Family's Story of Love, Captivity, and Survival - Maziar Bahari,Aimee Molloy,Jon Meacham

This is Bahari’s account of being imprisoned during the Green Revolution in Iran.  While the book was not gripping, it was a rather interesting book.  Bahari becomes the third member of his family to be imprisoned in Iran.  There is a sense of distance in his narrative of the imprisonment, most likely for his sanity, but Bahari does seem to be frank.  He doesn’t come across as holier than thou or anything.  Just an everyman who found himself in a horrible situation.

Quite frankly, I think Bahari should write a biography about his mother because she sounds like an awesome woman, and I would love to know more about her.

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review 2015-01-28 19:52
Rosewater
Rosewater (Movie Tie-in Edition): A Family's Story of Love, Captivity, and Survival - Maziar Bahari,Aimee Molloy,Jon Meacham

Rosewater (previously published as ‘Then They Came for Me’)

 

Maziar Bahari, 2011

 

In 2009, Newsweek journalist and documentary filmmaker Maziar Bahari was in Iran to cover the presidential elections. Born in Iran, Bahari was excited to witness the event, but was disappointed in the outcome, which he believed (as many did) was the result of vote-rigging by the current president, Ahmadinejad. While covering the mostly peaceful riots that followed, Bahari was arrested by the Revolutionary Guard and accused of being a spy for the West. This book tells the story of his 118 days in prison.

 

 

I’m not a political person. I don’t watch the news by choice. So I’ll admit that most of what I know about the 2009 presidential election in Iran and the events leading up to it and following it stemmed from what I watched on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, which I watch regularly. This is also how I came to know about Maziar Bahari, as he was a recurrent guest on the show (including the now infamous clip of him with Jason Jones that contributed to his arrest in the first place).

 

After reading this book I find that I am both better informed and more interested in what is happening in Iran. The situation over there is complicated and I don’t pretend to know everything about it after reading this book, but I do feel like I have at least a somewhat better understanding of things. This was one of the things that I really liked about this book – Bahari didn’t just use the pages to talk about his own experience, but told the story of countless other Iranians as well.

 

It’s hard to review a nonfiction book of this type, except to say that while tough to read at times, it was well worth it. Bahari didn’t make the torture scenes too graphic and uncomfortable, but certainly got his point across. And it was extremely informative, giving both historic context and current events without being boring or dry. Bahari is an excellent writer, and I think that anyone who is curious about what things are like for the people of Iran in the current situation would do well to read his story. I hope, as he does, that things will get better for people there in the future, but they certainly have a long, tough road ahead of them.

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