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review 2017-11-16 03:40
Fixing
Citywide (Five Boroughs) (Volume 6) - Santino Hassell

This short story collection is set in the series Five Boroughs.  These can probably be read as standalone novellas, but would better read in order with the series.  There are three books included, but for the review purposes we will look at the first story, Rerouted.

 

Chris is trying to move on with his life.  He is trying not to think about his past encounters with both Jace and Aiden.  The couple have a kind of open relationship that leaves room for someone like Chris.

 

Aiden & Jace have been trying to come up with a way to talk Chris into coming back and being with them more.  He has been distant lately, and this is a cause for some concern.  Is  there something wrong?

 

This was such a nice quick read.  Lovely characters I was excited to see again.  Also many visitors from the previous books in the series are present.  I like the fast pace of these books.  I also adore the banter and real world situations that feel like you are right there.  I am always feeling like I am home with this series.  I give this collection a 3/5 Kitty's Paws UP!

 

 

***This early copy was given by Netgalley and its publishers, in exchange for an honest review.

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text 2017-11-10 20:23
REVIEW BY DEBBIE - Cosmic Cabaret: Science Fiction Romance Anthology
Cosmic Cabaret: Science Fiction Romance Anthology - Alicia Kat Vancil,Athena Grayson,Dena Garson,Kerry Adrienne,Selene Grace Silver,Cailin Briste,Blaire Edens,Rosalie Redd,Jayne Fury,Diana Rivis,SFR Shooting Stars,Cathryn Cade (CJ Cade),Tessa McFionn,Jenna Lincoln

Where Hearts Collide in the Greatest Show in Space

Join us aboard Blue Star Line’s crown jewel, the LS Quantum. Thirteen USA Today, Amazon best-selling, award-winning speculative fiction romance authors deliver their twists on tales set in the dance halls and clubs of this luxury starship as it travels through space and time.

Follow princes, sultans, rock stars, scientists, cirque artists, and dancers as they solve murders, track thieves, fight bullies, plan heists and fall in love.

Catch a Falling Star by CJ Cade
Chaz Jaguari, inter-galactic singing star, hides out until a sexy Tygress wanders into his lair and brings the jaded star roaring back to life. 

Starlight by Kerry Adrienne
Astronomer Dr. Andrew Mann becomes enthralled with a performing particle shifter. Stella wants to trust the scientist, but she has a secret, and she’s scared. 

Midnight at Andromeda’s by Tessa McFionn
Reluctant groom, Prince Marqaz, moonlights as a common bartender...until the surprising arrival of his like-minded affianced, Karyna.

Stars Shining Bright Above by Jayne Fury
Astra Faraday ran from a life of piracy. Dr. Zane Jones signed on to the ship to escape a former life—one that was killing him. When her mentor is murdered their pasts collide as they solve the crime and fall in love.

Star-Studded Love by Rosalie Redd
Caleb hides his disability behind his job as an exotic dancer, keeping women at arm’s length. Then he meets Adara. How much will they risk to find their dreams together? 

Forbidden Alliance by Athena Grayson
It’s going to take brain surgery and rocket science to reunite a pair of long-lost, star-crossed lovers. 

Razer’s Edge by Selene Grace Silver
Erotic dancer Ayanna headlines at the cabaret until a psychic thief named Razer uses her identity to pull off the plunder of a lifetime, jeopardizing everything.

A Dance of Fallen Stars by Kat Vancil
Notorious playboy Kealan Corkoran’s been branded an illegal stowaway light-years from home. His one chance to get out of this mess: working under the impassioned daemon choreographer who got him into it. 

Vordol’s Vow by Dena Garson
Bodyguard Vordol Silveira vows to be the best, keeping his heart disengaged. Pitannah Lorento dreams of winning the intergalactic burlesque competition. When she’s threatened, Vordol’s vow is put to the test.

Hide and Peek by Blaire Edens
Religious zealots storm the burlesque club where Suzy headlines, forcing her run, leaving behind a precious possession. Davell hooks up with Suzy to catch the perps, her actions set off a chain of dangerous events. 

Educated by the Master by Cailin Briste
Take one talkative novice to kink. Combine with a master who prefers the silence of meditation. Bake on high heat at the Cosmic Cabaret. Luscious.

Comets and Caviar by Jenna Lincoln
Smooth undercover agent Malachi Cartier’s lavish tastes include fine spirits and ladies. 

 

#Science_Fiction, #Romance, #Anthology, 4 out of 5 (very good)

 

Source: sites.google.com/site/archaeolibrarian/debbie/cosmiccabaretsciencefictionromanceanthology
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review 2017-11-09 11:53
If you love Austen, Regency-period novels, and bad boys, you must read this
Dangerous to Know: Jane Austen's Rakes & Gentlemen Rogues - Joana Starnes,Amy D'Orazio,Katie Oliver,Karen M Cox,Jenetta James,Beau North,J. Marie Croft,Christina Morland,Lona Manning,Brooke West

Thanks to Rosie Amber from Rosie’s Book Review Team for alerting me to this opportunity and to the editor Christina Boyd for providing me with an early ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

After reading many great reviews of The Darcy Monologues, when I had the opportunity to sign up for this blog tour I could not resist. My fondness for Jane Austen’s novels cannot compare to that of the authors of this anthology, but rest assure that you don’t need to have read several times all of Austen’s novels to enjoy this collection (although I don’t doubt you might enjoy it even more if you have).

Each story centers on one of the rakes or gentlemen rogues in one of Jane Austen’s novels (sometimes several from the same novel). As the editor explains in her note, after The Darcy Monologues she and some of the authors started looking for another project and noticed that there are many characters that are fundamental to Austen’s novels, but we don’t get to know much about, and on many occasions we are left wondering how they got to be how they are, and what happens to them later. All the stories retain the historical period of the novels, sometimes going back to give us information about the background of the characters, to their childhood, early youth, and on occasion we follow them for many years, getting a good sense of who they become when they exit the novel.

Each one of the stories is prefaced by a little snippet about the character chosen, and by one or several quotations (sometimes spread throughout the story) taken directly from Austen’s novel, where the character is mentioned. I must say the authors remain very faithful to Austen’s words although they use their imagination to build upon those snippets, always remaining faithful to the language and the spirit of the period, although the modern sensibility is evident in the stories.

We have stories with happy endings, stories that are dark and sad, stories of broken hearts, funny stories (sometimes thanks to the wit of the characters involved, others thanks to the wit of the writers who follow in Austen’s footsteps and poke fun at the most preposterous individuals), and some touching ones. There are very clean stories and some steamier ones (as it seems only appropriate to these “gentlemen”), but the editor includes a very detailed classification of the degree of heat of each one of the stories, and apart from one of the stories A Wicked Game, the rest are not scandalous (even by Regency standards).

Many of the stories are told in the first person, and that helps us share and understand better the characters (however much we might like them or not), but the few told in the third person also work well, especially as they tend to centre on characters that are perhaps particularly insightless and more preoccupied with appearances than by the truth.

I imagine each reader will have his or her favourite stories. I was a bit surprised because I thought I’d enjoy more the stories featuring characters of the novels I was more familiar with, but that was not always the case. (OK, I truly loved Fitzwilliam’s Folly about Colonel Fitzwilliam from Pride and Prejudice, but not only because of the novel, but because the character is wonderful, witty, yes, Darcy makes an appearance so we get to see him from somebody else’s point of view and someone who knows him well at that, and I loved the female character in the story too). Some writers managed to create a sense of a small society, as it must have felt at the time, where characters from several novels kept meeting or just missing each other but are all connected or know of each other. I know this was a book about the gentlemen, but I was very taken by some of the female characters, that on many occasions were the perfect match for the men.

If you are curious to know which of the characters are featured, here is the list: John Willoughby (Willoughby’s Crossroads by Joanna Starnes), George Wickham (A Wicked Game by Katie Oliver. This is the hottest one and there are some similarities to the previous story but, if you’re a fan of the character, I think you’ll enjoy this one), Colonel Fitzwilliam (Fitzwilliam’s Folly by Beau North. I’ve already mentioned this one. I love Calliope Campbell too. Well, love everything about this story and the style and the repartee reminded me of Oscar Wilde’s plays), Thomas Bertram (The Address of a French Woman by Lona Manning. How blind can one be, or perhaps not!), Henry Crawford (Last Letter to Mansfield by Brooke West), Frank Churchill (An Honest Man by Karen M Cox. One of these characters enamoured of himself who tries to do the right thing but only if it is convenient and at little personal cost. I suffered for poor Miss Fairfax), Sir Walter Elliot (One Fair Claim by Christina Morland. This is one of the stories told in the third person that do follow the character for a long time. The song “You’re So Vain” might as well have been written about him. I really enjoyed this one, first because the comments about the character were funny, later, because the tone changes and I liked his wife, who, of course, loves to read), William Elliot (The Lost Chapter in the Life of William Elliot by Jenetta James. This somewhat related to the previous story but is quite different and particularly interesting for the comments about life in the theatre), General Tilney (As Much As He Can by Sophia Rose. This story, that uses both third and first person, I found particularly touching. Appearances can be deceptive, indeed), John Thorpe (The Art of Sinking by J. Marie Croft. This is a farce, the character a buffoon and the story really funny, especially because the character is the butt of all jokes but remains full of his own importance), and Captain Frederick Tilney (For Mischief’s Sake by Amy D’Orazio. Another great story. The main character justifies his actions insisting that he is helping other men avoid mistakes, but eventually learns to see things from a female perspective. A great female character too, Miss Gibbs).

I highlighted many passages and lines, but I don’t want to make this a never-ending review. I’ll just say the language is perfectly in keeping with the period and the stories and I’ll be exploring the books of all these writers. (There is information included about each one of them after their respective stories).

I did not cry with any of the stories (although some were quite touching), but I did laugh out loud with quite a few. I recommend this book to readers of historical romance and romance of any kind, those who enjoy short-stories with fully-fledged character, and I’m sure anybody interested in Regency novels and Jane Austen’s, in particular, will love this book.

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review 2017-11-03 00:38
My American Nightmare
My American Nightmare: Women In Horror Anthology - Azzurra Nox,Nicky Peacock

I'm late, as usual, reporting the rest of my Halloween Bingo squares...but this one was for Terrifying Women!

 

Ghosts, zombies, slashers, abductions, creepy dolls, and of course witches are included in this selection of creepy short stories. All written by women  My American Nightmare  contains everything from macabre to disturbing, perfect for Halloween time reading. With all stories set in the United States of America, some stories are historically set, some are current, the stories range from new horror to familiar retellings.    With all short story collections I enjoyed some stories more than others, however with Halloween right around the corner I gobbled up all the stories and appreciated the atmosphere that they gave to this time of year.  

One of my favorite stories was the Ballad of Sorrow and Lila which shows the power of strong feelings and why a bully never wins.

I also enjoyed The Pickman Sisters of Salem which will reverberate with any who loves Hocus Pocus.  

The last story in the grouping was a perfect send-off.  Mr. Button's Tea Party had a lot of elements, abductions, dolls and disfigurement; however, the creepiest part was that it felt like something that might actually happen to a person or a story you might hear about on the news.  This is one that I would have loved to see expanded upon. 


Overall, these short stories show that women in horror makes for a wonderfully spooky mix. 

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review 2017-10-29 00:36
My American Nightmare - Women in Horror Anthology
My American Nightmare: Women In Horror Anthology - Azzurra Nox,Nicky Peacock

This is a perfect for book to read this time of year. With Halloween Coming quickly. I had a blast scaring myself. This is an Anthology. it has 19 stories in the book. Each story is written by a different author. The stories run the range of every ghoul and goblin in the Halloween line up. From Ghost to zombies. These are short stories, but the creep factor grabs you quickly. There are several stories in this book I would love to read a whole book on. 

 

Picking a favorite story would be impossible for me. I really loved the first one, yea I know picking the first one is lame. But it is about a zombie apocalypse.  How a virus ends up effecting the whole country. The story takes place in Pennsylvania. A girl and her family are trying to escape their hometown but it ends up being too late. The mother gets sick first then the father. The girl ends up being alone and just as she forms a plan to escape she ends up with a sore throat. The first sign of being affected. I also have to admit I would love to read a full book on this story, it ended way to soon for me, but it really stuck with me. 

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