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Search tags: boy\'s-life
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review 2018-01-15 16:27
Anna Blanc is bored
The Secret Life of Anna Blanc - Jennifer Kincheloe

Anna is a wealthy 1907 Los Angeles woman who is fascinated by Sherlock Holmes and convinced that she could do as well. However her father is determined to marry her off and is determined that she will be a respectible bride.  She yearns for adventure and when she hears about an opportunity to become a police matron with the Los Angeles Police Department she is determined to try.

 

So she tries and she finds that it's not as easy as it looked but it is fulfilling and she's finding purpose and a distraction in a detective Joe Singer, but he's involved in a series of brothel murders, she must find the killer because she's starting to know these girls and they don't deserve it.

 

Interesting take and interesting twists.  I liked seeing how Anna Blanc changed her mind about things and was able to learn from experience. But she was very impulsive the whole way through.

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review 2018-01-15 06:55
The Science of Everyday Life by Len Fisher
The Science of Everyday Life: An Entertaining and Enlightening Examination of Everything We Do and Everything We See - Len Fisher

In this book, Len Fisher discusses the science of "everyday life", covering such topics as:  dunking cookies in coffee; boiling eggs; the physics of tools; adding up supermarket bulls; the physics of boomerang throwing; ball catching in baseball; foam; taste and aroma; and the physics of sex.  The book includes a few equations

While the book is enlightening it is not particularly entertaining.  I found the text in general to be somewhat long winded and the author discussions about his own experiments to be tedious.  I was also not particularly interested in most of the topics covered in this book.  Storm in a Teacup by Helen Czerski, is in my opinion, a more entertaining and interesting books that covers many more topics than this book.

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review 2018-01-14 15:56
Good
The Pigeon Tunnel: Stories from My Life - John le Carré

Le Carre’s book is more a collection of essays that may or may not be true (at least according to his disclaimer).  The essays range from the very personal (about his father) to the funny (about a credit card) to the historic (about Philby).  There are stories about the development of his novels for movies – including stories about Burton and Guinness.  There is a funny bit about Robert Redford.

 

                But Le Carre’s boo isn’t just name dropping, or to be more exact, it’s not about name dropping at all.  In part, Le Carre talks about his thinking, about how he sees things, flaws and all.  And while he doesn’t have the easy-going style of Neil Simon’s memoirs, there is a charm and breeziness to the essays. 

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text 2018-01-11 19:16
Reading progress update: I've read 118 out of 400 pages.
Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life - Helen Czerski

 

This is compelling reading -- I'm tempted to just race through the whole book in (almost) one go, but I've decided to take it slowly, one chapter at a time approximately every other day.  I'm not sure that will necessarily mean I'll ultimately remember more, but so far it's been adding to my enjoyment.

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review 2018-01-11 05:20
Natsume's Book of Friends (manga, vol. 13) by Yuki Midorikawa, translated by Lillian Olsen
Natsume's Book of Friends, Volume 13 - Yuki Midorikawa

In the first part of the volume, Matoba offers Natsume a job. Natsume doesn't want to accept, but he does agree to help with Matoba's little problem, a mask yokai hiding somewhere in his gathering of exorcists. Natori helps Natsume out by getting rid of Matoba's letter. The next part of the volume is a bit from Nishimura's POV - how he and Natsume met and became friends. He never realizes it, but

Natsume took care of a yokai that had been plaguing his family.

(spoiler show)

The volume ends with a story from Kitamoto's POV - how he met and befriended Natsume, and also Tanuma. He connects with Natsume over their shared anxiety about what to do once high school is over.

The stuff with Matoba was interesting and more suspenseful and action-filled than the rest of the volume. Still, I didn't like that part quite as much as the chapters that came after it. The Matoba clan feels so dark and cold compared to most of the people and beings Natsume interacts with. It was nice to see Natori again, though.

The two chapters from Kitamoto and Nishimura's POVs were great examples of why I love this series. Nishimura was such a nice guy, trying to befriend awkward Natsume. Tanuma and Taki are great, but it's also good to see people who have absolutely no clue about Natsume's abilities liking him and enjoying being with him, even though he probably comes across as a little strange from time to time. Kitamoto's chapter was nice too. I liked how he and Natsume had the same sort of seriousness and sense of responsibility - they both want to avoid being a burden on their family, although for different reasons.

I feel like every time I try to describe how good this series is, I make it sound boring...

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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