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review 2016-09-12 17:35
Fire on Montserrat Review
Fire on Montserrat: -An Inspirational Caribbean Romance Novel- - Mrs. Catherine Dorsette

The author's depiction of Montserrat and its people is exceptional. I love books that make you want to visit the destination especially when it is a Caribbean destination.

Kyla and Spence are young lovers torn apart by the worst circumstance, a horrible natural disaster. Too many years go by but their love is still strong and it helps them to rekindle the fire quickly.

I struggled with Spence as he placed everyone who was in his life before on a perpetual “back burner” to make Kyla his once again. I liked Kyla’s spunk and her Christian resolve to face her past and make a future for herself that she would be proud of. These two characters personalities flowed from past to present and set the pace for a well laid out story.  

I loved the supporting characters and the surprise ending.

I secretly adore crazy, colorful villains who wreck havoc mercilessly but I accept that forgiveness is in keeping with the Christian genre. I promise not to re-write anything in my head to bring certain people doom.    

As a bonus, I went in search for Montserrat’s food explanations – ‘goat water’ confused me deeply until I found the recipe online.   

I wish the author all the best and look forward to reading more from her.

This review was completed through Caribbean Books Foundation review programme contact marsha(a)caribbeanbook.org

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review 2015-03-02 01:25
Inner City Girl
Inner City Girl - Colleen Smith-Dennis

The strange thing about dialect is that it isn’t universal. It enriches a book for a particular market but sets it apart for another. Whenever I try to figure out what a “slang/colloquial” word may mean, it usually isn’t what it means. Months after in conversation I get that enlightened look and have to go back to the book.

Inner City girl started with heavy dialect. The conversation was rich enough to have me regretting I ever lent out my copy of “Cote ci Cote la.”

The book however would be nothing without it. The heavy dialect did more to frame the poverty than any other words. I could almost hear Martina’s mother’s slurs and understood Martina’s need to be different. The book outgrew the dialect as Martina grew: simple and subtle. The story was unique, a passionate advocate for overcoming life obstacles with determination. Another good read.      

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review 2015-03-01 23:06
Musical Youth
Musical Youth - Joanne C. Hillhouse

This was a sweet coming of age romance. I found myself saying awwww way too often. Shaka is the guy who falls hard for his girl and his animated crew lives the romance with him. Zahara is complicated but the music frees her, each cord brings her to herself. Many times in Caribbean books you reminisce about how your childhood compared and Pappy was it for me: holding everyone and everything together with simple finesse that you didn’t even notice it. Grandparents are wonderful.  


I have to admit that I was once weary of reading Caribbean fiction because they tend to get dark quickly and I don’t read books to be depressed. I am pleased to say that Joanne’s Musical Youth was refreshing and uplifting. Write on Joanne, write on.   



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review 2015-03-01 22:43
All Over Again
All Over Again - A-dZiko Simba Gegele

Growing up there must have been someone in your life to make you understand A-dziko’s words … “That is what he says and you wonder how that happens, how talking means you are a big man and not talking means you are a big man. And just as you are trying to figure out if you should keep quiet, or if you should talk or if you should run, out comes more unreasonableness.”


All over again captivated me and took me back years. I laughed out loud and fell in love with each one of the characters. I will recommend this book to everyone not just Caribbean nationals because the theme is universal. Growing up is a journey that is all yours and no one can live it for you. Cheers!  

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