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review 2018-04-11 10:31
Days Without End by Sebastian Barry
Days Without End - Sebastian Barry

Thomas McNulty, aged barely seventeen and having fled the Great Famine in Ireland, signs up for the U.S. Army in the 1850s. With his brother in arms, John Cole, Thomas goes on to fight in the Indian Wars—against the Sioux and the Yurok—and, ultimately, the Civil War. Orphans of terrible hardships themselves, the men find these days to be vivid and alive, despite the horrors they see and are complicit in. Moving from the plains of Wyoming to Tennessee, Sebastian Barry’s latest work is a masterpiece of atmosphere and language. An intensely poignant story of two men and the makeshift family they create with a young Sioux girl, Winona, Days Without End is a fresh and haunting portrait of the most fateful years in American history and is a novel never to be forgotten.

Amazon.com

 

 

 

Just after his 17th birthday, Thomas McNulty and his friend, John Cole, decide to enlist in the US Army as a way to escape their bleak home lives. This decision takes them through service during the Indian and Civil Wars. While they may have anticipated great adventures, they had no way of knowing the horrors of war that awaited them. 

 

The first half of the novel focuses on the Indian War years, as the boys not only learn basic soldiering, but also how to survive all the different types of weather and terrain as they march or ride across the country. Mother Nature brings them battles of her own in the form of vicious heat over the flatlands, freezing winters in camps with beyond meager supplies, fever epidemics, and food shortages (even the horses are starving to death). 

 

Racism of the day is another strong theme in this work. Though not written as one of the novel's racist characters himself, Thomas points out to the reader various examples he sees throughout the course of his life. For one, an Army acquaintance of Thomas and John's falls in love with an Ogalala Sioux woman, fathers a son with her. Thomas's response to the news: "I guess love laughs at history a little." Then there's John himself, who is part Native American... apparently that "part" is visible enough in his appearance for him to get a dose of hate speech directed his way.

 

We were two wood shavings of humanity in a rough world.. (Thomas re: him and John)... You had to love John Cole for what he chose never to say. He said plenty of the useful stuff

 

 

There's also the matter of Thomas and his friends working at a theater between tours of duty, a job that occasionally has them doing minstrel shows in blackface. I'd also mention that there is a description near the end of the book where the men remember coming upon 30 black people who had recently been hanged together. I warn you, this description is mildly graphic.

 

In truth, there's a strong dose of graphic material throughout the whole novel. Chapter 2 is mostly about hunting, killing, and cutting up buffalo. Chapter 3 focuses on massacring Indians. The gritty, graphic nature of the writing only increases as you approach the closing chapters of the story. 

 

Chapter 12 starts the Civil War experiences, sending Thomas and John to Boston, Massachusetts for training. There Thomas meets a fellow Irish immigrant. They swap stories of their "coming over" experience on the boats, giving the reader a grim look at the reality of what families risked to get here for the chance at a new life. It is through this meeting that Thomas ponders on the realization of just how often Irish men were treated like total scum... until the Army needed soldiers for their causes. 

 

The story is told in Thomas's first person perspective, but as an older man now retired and living in Tennessee, looking back on his wild youth. Said youth starts in Ireland, but (after he loses his entire family) soon brings him to the US as a teenage immigrant, eventually deciding to settle in Missouri. If you struggle with reading stories written in dialects, I warn you that this one is written in a kind of "country boy" voice that only gets stronger as your reading progresses. There's also a healthy dose of cursing -- some used just as a matter of speech, some as actual intended profanity in the situation. 

 

Thomas also describes what it was like being a gay man -- his lover being his friend John -- in this era, with a penchant for cross dressing. Every so often we also get a glimpse of his sassiness, such as his thoughts on his short stature: "I'm a little man right enough but maybe the best dagger is a short one sometimes." (Meanwhile, John is 6'3.)

 

The plot didn't keep my attention all that well. There is something to Barry's writing that I could appreciate. The verbiage itself is solid enough, Thomas gives the reader a good laugh here and there, there are lots of pretty lines -- such as "our breath is flowing out like lonesome flowers that die on the air" --  but something was still lacking. I just didn't find myself emotionally committing to these characters, as far as their life stories go. What I do give points for are the themes / topics Barry leaves you to ponder on, such as racism of the era, the topic of immigration, or my favorite, the dichotomy that extends to exist within the Irish spirit. The sweetness vs. the hellfire. There's a whole passage on this that really rang true with me and had me nodding in recognition! 

 

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review 2018-04-10 21:57
You're Killing Me!!...
Why Kill The Innocent (Sebastian St. Cyr Mystery) - C.S. Harris

I was very dissapointed when I finished this book. I felt like Harris just shortchanged me as a reader and her characters with this cut and pasted drivel. I normally love this series but I didn't get any warm fuzzy feelings from this book at all. The whole time I was reading it I was completely bored and it was painstakingly obvious how particular sections of writing were exactly the same and located in exactly the same places within chapters as in previous books. I know some authors like to use an outline which I don't mind in increments but when the rest of the story is so boring that, that's all I can focus on then something is not right. I just got the impression that Harris put very little time or effort into this book. If you're tired of writing about your own characters, then it's time to move on and it's time for me to move on too! Don't put out half-assed written books and expect your readers not to notice or care because we will and we do.

 

*I received this ARC from Penguin Random House First-to-Read program in exchange for an honest review. Thank you!

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text 2018-04-10 03:44
Reading progress update: I've read 100%.
Why Kill The Innocent (Sebastian St. Cyr Mystery) - C.S. Harris

I'm kind of sad- this book just didn't do it for me like the rest of the series. Review to come..

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text 2018-04-04 01:00
Reading progress update: I've read 23%.
Why Kill The Innocent (Sebastian St. Cyr Mystery) - C.S. Harris

There were a couple of loose ends from the last book that I'm dying to learn more about - 

 

1) Hero's mom, who I'd bet money was poisoned by her cousin Victoria and 2) the second killer is still on the loose

 

(spoiler show)

so I'm really, really hoping those storylines get reintroduced at some point in this book. 

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review 2018-04-04 00:33
Sebastian St. Cyr Mystery #12
Where the Dead Lie (Sebastian St. Cyr Mystery) - C.S. Harris

I just love this series! C.S. Harris never disappoints! In this book, Sebastian has his hands full searching for a sadistic psycho that enjoys raping, torturing and murdering young boys and girls for pure pleasure. It was pretty riveting and by the end, I was just as anxious to find the murdering sickos just as much as Sebastian was. 

 

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