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review 2017-12-21 19:15
Chernobyl Prayer
Chernobyl Prayer: A Chronicle of the Future - Svetlana Alexievich,Anna Gunin,Arch Tait

I went into the Zone from the very beginning. I remember stopping in a village being struck by the silence. No birds, nothing. You walk down a street … silence. Well, of course, I knew all the cottages were lifeless, that there were no people because they had all left, but everything around had fallen silent. Not a single bird. It was the first time I had ever seen a land without birds, without mosquitoes. Nothing flying in the air.

 

Chernobyl Prayer consists of monologues from people, who in one way or another has been affected by Chernobyl. People, who have been evacuated from their hometowns. Clean up workers. People, who have returned to their contaminated home stead. Children, who are suffering from various diseases. Scientists, who know what to do, but doesn´t stand a chance against the decisions made by the government.

 

I guess I don´t have to mention that a lot of these voices have died by now. This book is such a powerful, heartbreaking, agonising, infuriating and maddening read and it gives you an insight into the mindset of the Soviet people and their dependence on the state back then. It´s hard to grasp what has happened back then. This book provides a look into the lives of the people, who have been affected by this disaster.

 

It´s one of the best books I have ever read and I will let a few quotes speak for themselves:

 

The fear didn´t set in for a long time: for almost a month everyone was on tenterhooks, waiting for them to announce that, under the leadership of the Communist party, our scientists, our heroic firemen our soldiers have once again conquered the elements. […] From all the textbooks and other books we´d read, in our minds we pictured the world as follows: military nuclear power was a sinister mushroom, cloud billowing up into the sky, like at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, incinerating people instantly; whereas peaceful nuclear energy was a harmless light bulb.

 

People are always comparing it to the war. War, though, you can understand. My father told me about the war, and I´ve read books about it. But this? All that is left of our village is three graveyards: one has people lying in it, the old graveyard; the second has all the cats and dogs we left behind, which were shot; the third has our homes.

They buried even our houses.

 

And just a few people could kill us. Not maniacs and criminals with a terrorist plan in their heads, just ordinary operators on duty that day at an atomic power station. They were probably quite decent men.

 

We told all these jokes. They send an American robot up to work on the roof. It operates for five minutes, then breaks down. Then a Japanese robot lasts nine minutes before it breaks down too. The Russian robot works for two hours, then, over the walkie-talkie, “Okay, Private Ivanov, you can come down now for a cigarette break.” Ha Ha!

 

What was needed was potassium iodide, standard iodine. Two or three drops in a half glass of fruit jelly for children, and three to four drops for adults. The reactor was burning for ten days, and for ten days the people should have been taking that.

 

Book themes for World Peace Day: Read a book by or about a Nobel Peace Prize winner, or about a protagonist (fictional or nonfictional) who has a reputation as a peacemaker.

 

Svetlana Alexievich won the Nobel Prize in 2015.

 

 

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text 2017-12-20 20:35
Reading progress update: I've read 294 out of 294 pages.
Chernobyl Prayer: A Chronicle of the Future - Svetlana Alexievich,Anna Gunin,Arch Tait

If I could give a ten star rating, this book would have deserved it. It´s fantastic.

 

A full review will follow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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text 2017-12-18 19:35
Reading progress update: I've read 60 out of 294 pages.
Chernobyl Prayer: A Chronicle of the Future - Svetlana Alexievich,Anna Gunin,Arch Tait

 I´m on page 60 and two things might very well come true with this book:

 

  1. It might become my best book of the year.
  2. It might utterly destroy me.

 

 

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review 2016-07-28 05:03
Because KNOTTING that's why!
Werewolves of Chernobyl - K.A. Merikan,L.A. Witt

3.75 HEARTS--

"Did I...did I just get fucked by a werewolf?

Yes.

Yes I did.

Technically I'm still being fucked by a werewolf.

Because this hasn't been the weirdest leg of my journey."

Me when KNOTTING is mentioned:

 

 

All right, who are we kidding? This is me:

 

 

After reading who knows how many KNOTTING fics/stories, I can happily say KNOTTING is one of my favorite things about shifter stories. There's a (unicorn) scientific list of...requisites that makes for good KNOTTING.

 

This definitely covered the list.

 

A sample of KNOTTING winners:

 

Fat KNOTS forced inside tight holes

Biting (back of the neck is #1) while pumping semen into said hole

Tears and/or exclamations of the KNOT "not fitting"

 

"Werewolves of Chernobyl" isn't all about KNOTTING, but KNOT enthusiasts would appreciate the details.

 

Urban explorer and blogger Quinn is in the Ukraine on a Chernobyl tour. He lives for danger and adventure, sneaks off onto forbidden territory and gets the fright of his life. A living breathing werewolf. After a cute exchange (minus an injury), he think it'll be a lifetime experience. Wrong! Quinn leaves a bigger impression on the werewolf (bodark), Dima.

 

Dima is crippled due to a birth deformity, an arm doesn't fully function but it doesn't stop his determination to have that human be his "bitch". He recruits one of the strongest bodarks who also happens to be his childhood friend and lover, Nazar. Dima is small to Nazar's hulking bodark frame. But Nazar, has a little secret:

 

He's not happy with his assigned sexual role.

That feeling deep inside, making his cock hot and rigid as if he were about to come without even his dick being touched, made him realize in a half second that this was exactly what he wanted to be. Mounted, and serving another man with his body, and the pleasure originating inside him was proof of that.

 

Neither is another certain isolated bodark, pair that with their newly acquired human who comes from the outside world and the cultural differences are explosive.

 

I really love the idea of this novel. There are a lot of things going on, I mean just look at the blurb. The hierarchy, kidnapping, sexual roles, isolation, disability...it oddly worked for where the story went. Each guy brought something different to the table and for the most part, they had some depth to carry these emotions and issues out.

 

I like my triangles as equal as possible. And with these three, I think their dynamics are as equal as they could be. Each man has a role and they represent it - top, bottom, or switch to the best of their ability.

 

Though, if I could keep 2 out of the 3 together, I'd love it. Nazar and Dima wormed their way into my pocket.

 

Dima - the outcast due to his birth deformity, size and underdeveloped bodark skills (namely not being able to speak while in bodark form). He's the underdog and you can't help but root for him. He's hotheaded, rash and has a loyal heart. He's a true friend to Nazar, even when he got what he wanted, Nazar was never far from his heart nor brain - though bodarks have no time for feelings.

 

Nazar - the big guy who is supposed be alpha, used for his fighting skills and owns a gentle heart. He always put Dima first. That devotion is everlasting, you can see it when Dima would go off on a wild tangent. Nazar hovered in the background and let his Dima, his "bitch" test his claws, so to speak.

 

These friends had emotions to add to their sexy times. And the sex was rocking with those two and with Quinn.

 

But...

 

Quinn - I tried to like him but I was ambivalent toward the end. He was obnoxious in a way. He didn't follow orders, even when he was told more than one time to follow the bodark custom with collars and he still didn't get it. He didn't listen to authorities...anyone really. He was too headstrong for my liking. Do I think he deserves Nazar and Dima? Not really. but he's the one for them (though I might be the only hoping that in the future they find someone who isn't as wishy washy) Quinn is a nice guy, he means well but sometimes he read disingenuous and the bodarks are all heart and truth.

 

There was some action and violence also added. But the ending was rushed. There were loose ends and major plot threads left unanswered or forgotten: such as who the Directorate was? What with the sudden change of heart from the alleged villain/top dog? What are these missions that Nazar went on? How did the escape exactly happen?

 

There were personality transplants here and there, which didn't make for consistent read. The last chapter or so was rushed, the epilogue wasn't any better. The sentiments are nice. There is an implied HEA/ strong HFN ending but there was room for more and areas that needed tightening up. The plot could have been stellar if the suspense angle was stronger and more defined. It was like reading 10th draft mixed in with 2nd drafts in spots. There were a couple of typos but it didn't detract from the story.

 

Overall, good story. Pretty good. I thought it was going to be sex-a-palooza and it wasn't the plot ideas with cultural differences were the biggest draw for me. (Yes, even over the KNOTTING). I was fascinated by the bodark culture. I wanted to know all the ins and outs, the hierarchy, maybe deeper knowledge of the main players.

 

I like these authors playing together in the sandbox. I think they played to each others strengths, for the most part.

 

I would definitely read another story based in this world, this trio of authors created. Isolated bodarks make for interesting stories.

 

Oh and KNOTTING.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lots more KNOTTING please?

 

*This message has been approved by the KNOTTING Fans Association.

 



A copy provided for an honest review.

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text 2016-07-11 21:32
Voices Of Chernobyl
[(Voces de Chernóbil / Voices from Chernobyl: Crónica Del Futuro / Chronicle of the Future)] [Author: Svetlana Alexievitch] published on (January, 2015) - Svetlana Alexievich

This has to be one of the most beautiful books I've ever read. 

 

And it's not written; it's all stories from the people themselves. 

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