logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: children-ya
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-01-16 05:02
Review: Colorfull
ColorFull - Ying-Hwa Hu,Cornelius Van Wright,Dorena Williamson

This story as a meanful teaching for children. I got the meaning of the story or the moral of the story as you read. This is a great story for children of all ages. Parents should pick this one out and help teach our children what it mean to be different.

The author does a wonderful job of this though pictures and story itself. She show how god created a world that is colorfull. Would you want your child to be colorblind? God made us to see colorfull and world colorfull so we should teach our children that being different skin color like chocolate it okay and that even siblings may look the same but different. This a book teach children and others that colors are beautiful. If everything was the same color our world would be dark or not special.

Look at your world differently and teach our children and child to be kind and say there a reason god made each and everything with colors. He want as to see Colorfull.

Source: nrcbooks.blogspot.com/2019/01/book-review-colorfull.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-01-15 20:30
Daba's Travels from Ouadda to Bangui by Makombo Bamboté
Daba's Travels from Ouadda to Bangui - Makombo Bamboté,George Ford

Like apparently most of the people who read this book, I read it for my world books challenge and wasn’t particularly impressed. It seems to be aimed at middle-grade readers (ages 9-12), and recounts the childhood experiences of a boy named Daba as he leaves his village in the Central African Republic to attend school in a larger town and spends his vacations traveling around the country with friends and relatives.

As you would expect, this is a quick and easy read that even includes some illustrations. It’s a pretty gentle story, including adventures such as attending a boarding school and tagging along for a crocodile hunt. However, it is disjointed, prematurely ending events that could have been exciting if fully-developed – like the crocodile hunt, which gets less page time than a neighbor telling the boys a story – and including more episodes than fit comfortably within its brief page count. It does little to immerse the reader in Daba’s feelings or experiences; in the second half of the book, he seems to fade into his group of friends, who are indistinguishable in personality and experiences (except for the French pen pal who somehow is able to fly to a Central African Republic town alone and spend the summer wandering from village to isolated village with the local boys).

Daba grows older – the book appears to cover a couple of years – but he doesn’t really have struggles to overcome or seem to change or learn more about life. At times, knowing the story to be based in some way on the author’s childhood, Daba’s portrayal even comes across as self-aggrandizing: a star pupil, always cool and confident, beats adults at games, liked by everyone except for one classmate who’s condemned by other children and adults alike. Meanwhile, for adult readers, the language is perhaps too simple, and some of the events are eyebrow-raising or could use more explanation (the pen pal trip, Daba’s being awarded a scholarship to study abroad without any apparent effort from him or consent from his parents, etc.).

At any rate, this isn’t too bad if you’re doing a world books challenge – Daba travels around his country, giving the reader a sense of the landscape and the culture in the places he visits, and quick reads are always valued for big challenges – but those searching for diverse books to give to the children in their lives would be better served looking elsewhere.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-01-15 18:44
Review: A House for a Mouse
A House for a Mouse - Rebecca Westberg

The story of the two mice is a sweet one. Though it really does not really have much of a story to it. The story is how to get a house for a mouse. I like it but it not much of a story. The author does a wonderful job with the pictures in telling the story to a point.

The pictures could be down a bit more. There is not much of adventure to this story. The development of the characters is not there much. This need some work. This is best for children under the age of 7. Children that can read will be able to read it. It good for young children a bit for the picures for children under 5.

The author would have told the story as how the owner of the home came about and then found the mice or mouse and had a bit more of an adventure to how it ends. I say this book would have gotten a better rating. It an okay book to me. Maybe to you it will be better for you. You decide if you want it for your children or not. Like I said it an okay book. Great for children.

Source: nrcbooks.blogspot.com/2019/01/book-review-house-for-mouse.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-01-14 15:48
Book Review of Little Astronomer: Once Upon a Sun (Kid Lit Science Book 2) by Julia Stilchen
Little Astronomer: Once Upon a Sun - Julia Lela Stilchen

Little Astronomer books aim to encourage children to learn about Astronomy and our place in the Solar System and the Universe.

 

From the Kid Lit Science Book series comes Once upon a Sun (book 2). The Sun, illustrated as an anthropomorphous character, shares his side of the story about his origins and his journey emerging from a Stellar Nebula to becoming the star he is today. Illustrations include kid-friendly concepts of how our Sun makes energy and takes care of our Solar System.

 

Kids are sure to enjoy learning about our Sun through fun facts delivered with humor throughout the colorful pages. Included is a full cast of the rocky planets, gas giants, dwarf planets and Comet from the previous book.

 

Celestial objects included are the rocky planets, gas giants, dwarf planets and a comet.

 

Kid Lit Science books approach early learning by combining kawaii (cute) versions of the celestial objects with comic-style graphics, and humor to present educational facts in a fun way. It makes a great addition to learning in the classroom and at home.

 

Review 5*

 

Fantastic children’s solar system reference book!

 

This book is an excellent way to teach a child about the solar system. The illustrations are well thought out and clearly show the sun and planets for those children who are not able to read yet, but also has words which explain in a fun way how the sun’s energy is produced. The author has given each sun and planet a personality, and I love DJ-ing Saturn - he knows how to p-a-r-t-y! I’m now looking forward to reading the next book in the series, even though I’m not the intended audience. This book is aimed at children aged from 0 to 9, but older children and adults will love it too.

 

Julia Stilchen has written and illustrated a fantastic reference book for children. I love that she has used simple words to explain how the solar system works. The illustrations are cute and fun. I have read other works by this author, and I love the way she writes.

 

I highly recommend this book to children of all ages, and adults looking for a fun, educational book showing how the solar system works. - Lynn Worton

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-01-11 22:43
Invisible Emmie by Terri Libenson
Invisible Emmie - Terri Libenson,Terri Libenson

I loved this book.

 

I could see a lot of younger me and even some adult me in Emmie (being the shy, quiet type, among other things she went through.) Emmie is basically writing in her diary that we somehow stumbled upon. The book switches from shy Emmie's POV to popular "has everything" Katie's POV.

Emmie writes things as she sees them. In the little comic drawings, she points things out, like "this is the drama club, with the emo girl," or "the smelly kid." I don't think she's being mean. She does not intend anyone to read her "diary." She calls a girl "huge" which can be seen as fat shaming by some, but I don't see it that way. Fat, huge... those are descriptive words. She didn't call the girl "the disgusting fat girl," or something like that! She just said the "huge girl pushed her out of the way to get to the bathroom."

She points out the different types of people who get made fun of in school, one category happens to be someone with a disability, in this case, the kid had a "math disability," which I take for a learning disability. I don't think she's being cruel, but the sad fact is the type of people she mentioned do get made fun of more often than other people. She only mentions this to make a point that she belongs to none of the "make fun of" groups and she is invisible. Nobody sees her.

I belong to all the groups she is so-called shaming (Man school was tough!), and I did not feel offended or shamed at all, but that is just me.

The ending of this book can be taken two ways. Good. It was a great ending... but... some might say bittersweet, maybe sad.

 

Here'swhy, major spoilers!

Does she have multiple personality disorder or was Katie really only an alter ego/imaginary friend? Is the book that deep? I guess that is up to interpretation. The ending did make me cry a little when it all made more sense. I was thinking "Katie" was way too perfect; it's annoying!

(spoiler show)
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?