logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: classics
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-06-24 03:06
[REVIEW] The Lover by Marguerite Duras
The Lover - Marguerite Duras,Barbara Bray
“People ought to be told of such things. Ought to be taught that immortality is mortal, that it can die, it’s happened before and it happens still.” (90%)



The prose is so beautiful, so evocative, that I am immediately transported into the world of “The Lover”. I am glad I read the introduction, confusing as it was because it let me know two important things: 1. this novel is 'somewhat' autobiographical of the author and 2. the characters are mostly nameless.

Because it is written in the first person, you are immediately gripped by the narrator’s voice. The rawness of her emotion is palpable. The timeline isn’t clearly established, we keep jumping back and forth between different ages/memories of the narrator which can be jarring at times.

While reading about a 15-year-old engaging in a sexual relationship with a 27-year-old is deeply unsettling, because of the way the narrator tells the story, you can become confused and think of her as older than 15. I wonder if she engaged in sex as a way to combat the sadness she says she has always felt within her, a sadness that ages her young face and that is mirrored in the deep melancholy of her mother. It's truly heartbreaking.

As it is, the whole novel is accompanied by a sad, melancholic tone and it doesn't let up until you've finished the book.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-06-24 03:01
[REVIEW] The Princess of Cleves by Madame de La Fayette
The Princess of Cleves - Madame de La Fayette

God, what a heartbreaking novel. Even while I suspected where it would go, I held on to the hope that maybe it wouldn't go there. Ultimately it did and my poor heart could not take it. Move over Romeo and Juliet, the Duke of Nemours and the Princess of Clèves are the patron saints of star-crossed lovers.

 

The beginning is a chore to get through. The name dropping of the everyone in the French Court is supposed to give you a sense of place along with a cast of characters but it just ended up confusing me even more. Nonetheless, I kept reading.

 

The Princess of Clèves and the Duke of Nemours are a delight to read about it, mostly because we get to see their character evolution. Their story is nothing short of gut-wrenching; their love so true and genuine. But, by all means, this novel isn't perfect. It suffers a lot from frequent visits of the Goddess of Exposition™ which I believe take away from the main story. Sure I want some backstory on the situation but not pages upon pages upon pages of it.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-06-24 02:52
[REVIEW] Phaedra by Jean Racine
Phaedra - Jean Racine,Richard Wilbur,Igor Tulipanov

I am surprised at how easy this was to read. After reading little bits on my commute, I sat down and finished it in a day.

Shame colors Phaedra’s life and blinds her completely to any solution other than death. She is not a reasonable person at any point until the very end when she has seen the consequence of her passion. She had hoped in vain that Hippolyte would return her feelings and save her from the shroud of guilt that covered her. Ultimately, he became so disgusted by her sentiments that it made her shame grow into a monster she couldn’t control and that would be the cause for Hippolyte’s unjust demise.

I was not a fan of the false rape accusation at all. It perpetuates this bullshit that women falsely accuse men of rape out of spite. Not here for this.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-06-24 02:48
[REVIEW] Sappho by Sappho
Sappho: A New Translation - Sappho,Mary Barnard,Dudley Fitts
You may forget but

Let me tell you
this: someone in
some future time
will think of us



Beautiful, painful, evocative, sensual and lush are a few ways to describe Sappho's poetry. Even if we only have incomplete and broken fragments of her poetry, there is no absence of emotion.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-06-24 02:45
[REVIEW] A Room of One's Own by Virginia Woolf
A Room of One's Own - Virginia Woolf

My first Virginia Woolf. It was very interesting. That first half though? Good grief. It was a rambling, meandering mess. I fell asleep three times trying to get through it.

The middle portion of the book is excellent. Some of her views sadly still apply today. How women are considered inferior, how they must be a mirror that reflects men's greatness back at them and if they don't fulfill this role, they are mercilessly attacked. It's all very true in this day and age.

She spoke from her perspective but as I read, I couldn't help but wonder about the women of color back then had the shit end of the stick.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?