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text 2017-05-22 16:39
Reading progress update: I've read 4 out of 400 pages.
Miles Morales: Ultimate Spider-Man Ultimate Collection Book 1 - Sara Pichelli,David Marquez,Chris Samnee,Brian Michael Bendis

I'm halfway tempted to do what I never do, and follow up a graphic novel with another graphic novel; this looks SO good! it's probably not going to happen--Disclaimer will likely prevail--but I am looking forward to Miles Morales as my gatekeeper to the Ultimates Universe, or whatever I'm supposed to be calling it. the added bonus: flipping through this, and reading the back cover, has revealed a Mysterio presence, AND a Prowler presence...two of my fave raves! so, soon, no doubt.

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text 2017-05-16 14:15
Reading progress update: I've read 34 out of 392 pages.
Guardians of the Galaxy: Collect Them All - Corinne Duyvis

That Rocket and Groot moment gave me all the feels.

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text 2017-05-15 23:18
Reading progress update: I've read 33 out of 392 pages.
Guardians of the Galaxy: Collect Them All - Corinne Duyvis

Mention of Inhumans.   Yay!   I think I'm going to be rude and read through my group dinner which I never enjoy.   The woman who bitches at me and others is snapping at my friend because she's bitching about something then getting snotty about him commenting on her rants.

 

The Guardians should get me through this.

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text 2017-04-07 10:45
7th April 2017
The Works of William Wordsworth (Wordsworth Collection) - William Wordsworth

The best portion of a good man's life: his little, nameless unremembered acts of kindness and love.

 

William Wordsworth

 

British poet William Wordsworth (born April 7, 1770) was a key figure in the Romantic Age, which privileged emotion over reason and was seen as a cultural revolt against the Industrial Revolution.

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review 2016-09-22 00:00
Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World
Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World - Bruce Schneier I love the topic. I love the details provided in this book. But, to tell a story you need more than a great topic and a bunch of facts. One needs a narrative and an attitude to tie the pieces together. This book lacked the story telling 'je ne sais quas" (literal: "I don't know what", but figuratively "elusive quality") though he does have the attitude.

I don't think there is any current topic where I could be more interested in than along the lines of the merging of the data that is out there with computers and algorithms, and I would consider Edward Snowden a hero, because what we have learned from him and the potential to do harm (as well as good) with the merging of big data with computers and the power of using context and content that both government and corporations (and even private citizens) can use against us (or for us) as a potential threat to our liberty or a boon to our equality. Complete liberty means no equality, and complete equality means no liberty. There is a balance and books like this can offer a guideline, but it needs the story to tie the pieces together with a narrative of some kind.

I'll give an example, of a book that I just recently read. "Rise of the Machines", by Thomas Rid. He covers many of the same topics that were covered in this book, especially on the part of encryption and PGP (pretty good privacy). At the same time that book always had a theme woven into the story as a whole in which he was tying all the pieces together, and even summarized them in the final chapter for the dense reader like me. This book, "Data and Goliath", doesn't interweave them coherently and therefore made what should have been an incredibly exciting story for me into a dull story with a lot of facts.

My problem with this book is not that it didn't give the listener plenty of details, but it didn't give the listener an easy story to tell so one can, for example, share with colleagues over the water cooler while at work. The values we use to explain the world through science would include: simplicity, accuracy, prediction, fitting in to the web of knowledge, and lastly the ability to explain. In order to explain, one needs a story to put the pieces together this book doesn't offer that. (Galileo had a story to tell as well as plenty of details. Read "Dialogs Concerning Two Chief World Systems", e.g.).

I'm in the minority on this book. It gave me details which I loved, but it lacked a over arcing narrative that I could wrap my mind around. Good fiction needs a story to hook the listener, and non-fiction needs that narrative even more as to not bore. I like all genres of non-fiction except for the boring kind.
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