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Search tags: crime-and-trial
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text 2018-04-21 02:38
Reading progress update: I've read 122 out of 269 pages.
Trial and Error (Arcturus Crime Classics) - Anthony Berkeley

wickedly entertaining, like a good Hitchcock film, where someone thinks he can get away with something because he has the "perfect" plan. I think perfect plans enjoy going bad.

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text 2018-04-20 15:00
Reading progress update: I've read 24 out of 269 pages.
Trial and Error (Arcturus Crime Classics) - Anthony Berkeley

Mr. Todhunter--with only a few months to live--considers political assassination as the best way to benefit humanity before he dies. but first he has to visit Mr. A. W. Furze, to help get his thoughts clear on this matter...

 

interesting start. Berkeley's style--to which I've had limited exposure so far--is unique, and I could see it being repellent to some, but I like it. meanwhile...I guess in a way this is a form of old-school vigilante tale, but the vigilante will only be around long enough to claim one victim (presumably).

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text 2018-04-20 03:45
Reading progress update: I've read 6 out of 269 pages.
Trial and Error (Arcturus Crime Classics) - Anthony Berkeley

this sounds like a frickin' blast--terminally ill man decides to find someone he judges to be a human being unworthy to live, murders him, sees someone else charged with the crime, and works to establish that the cops have got the wrong man. I've read and enjoyed one other novel by Berkeley--that would be Before the Fact, which he wrote as Francis Iles. I wonder if this one can be even half as good, but the plot synopsis suggests there's a chance.

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review 2016-09-10 19:45
Free Square - Riveting true Crime
Pretty Jane and the Viper of Kidbrooke Lane: A True Story of Victorian Law and Disorder: The First Unsolved Murder of the Victorian Age - Paul Thomas Murphy

I had heard of this murder before reading this book.

This book is great. Murphy's research is great. More importantly he places the murder in context, touching not just on the justice system of the time, but also on the role of maids of all work, class, publishing, and lawyers. It is a really great look at a case and totally well done.

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review 2016-06-16 00:18
Somebody's Daughter: Inside an International Prostitution Ring - Phonse Jessome

Disclaimer: ARC via Netgalley

 

                Recently there has been much debate about what the correct response to prostitution should be.  Should sex work be made legal?  Should the buying of intercourse be outlawed but not the selling?  A total ban perhaps?

 

                I don’t know.  My opinion changes and changes.  And damn, I don’t know.

 

                One thing that practically everyone can agree on, at least I hope so, is that underage prostitution needs to end.  Though detailing a case from the mid-1990s, Jessome’s Somebody’s Daughter is a good example of way this should be so.  

 

                Jessome’s book details the investigation into a prostitution/trafficking ring that funneled girls from Nova Scotia and other areas into Montreal and Toronto.  The ring was controlled largely by men from the Halifax area.  Jessome is mostly concerned with following the outcome of the investigation as well as the struggles of some of the young girls to leave prostitution behind.  He also chronicles how the young girls became prostitutes and what their lives were like while in “The Game”.

 

                While Jessome does present a brief outline of the rise of prostitution in the area, and hints at the vast amount of money that can be earned, the focus is primary on the more personal stories.  This is hardly surprising because personal stories have an impact that raw statics do not have.  I did find myself wishing at times that I had better grasp of the finical situation.  How much in raw numbers did the various women in each “stable “bring in, for instance.  That aside, Jessome’s writing is gripping.  He does not make the young girls into hapless and passive victims.  The ones that he chooses to follow come from varying circumstances, so you are not hearing the same stories over and over again.

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