logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: crime-classics
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-05-13 17:12
It's no Ripley, but it's all right
Strangers on a Train - Patricia Highsmith

I'm going to surmise that this is one of those rare occasions where the movie actually exceeds the book. 

 

Patricia Highsmith was amazing, of that there is no doubt. However, this book was extremely frustrating to read because there are so many terrible decisions being made by the main character, Guy Haines, whose encounter with a psychotic murderer is a terrible turning point in his life.

 

The plot is quite different from what I thought I understood it to be - and perhaps the movie aligns more with my misunderstanding. I went into it thinking it was more of an inverted mystery, and was interested to see where the mistake was made for the investigators to figure it out. I wasn't expecting one half of the plot to be a reluctant participant, and nearly as much of a victim as the murder victims.

 

I think that the biggest problem with this book is that it felt about 100 pages too long, and took fairly close to forever to get to the point. While Highsmith excels at building suspense, the pacing was way off in this one. In addition, the end was sort of anticlimactic. 

 

I'm still a card-carrying member of the Patricia Highsmith fan club, but this was a bit of a disappointment.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-04-23 16:16
Reading progress update: I've read 60%.
Strangers on a Train - Patricia Highsmith

After reading more than half of this one, and all of The Talented Mr. Ripley, Patricia Highsmith has overtaken Shirley Jackson as the American woman writing the most terrifying characters in literature. 

 

Moral of the story: do not talk to anyone, anywhere, ever. Do not make eye contact. In fact, pretend to be dead. Yeah, do that.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-04-21 02:38
Reading progress update: I've read 122 out of 269 pages.
Trial and Error (Arcturus Crime Classics) - Anthony Berkeley

wickedly entertaining, like a good Hitchcock film, where someone thinks he can get away with something because he has the "perfect" plan. I think perfect plans enjoy going bad.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-04-20 15:00
Reading progress update: I've read 24 out of 269 pages.
Trial and Error (Arcturus Crime Classics) - Anthony Berkeley

Mr. Todhunter--with only a few months to live--considers political assassination as the best way to benefit humanity before he dies. but first he has to visit Mr. A. W. Furze, to help get his thoughts clear on this matter...

 

interesting start. Berkeley's style--to which I've had limited exposure so far--is unique, and I could see it being repellent to some, but I like it. meanwhile...I guess in a way this is a form of old-school vigilante tale, but the vigilante will only be around long enough to claim one victim (presumably).

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-04-20 03:45
Reading progress update: I've read 6 out of 269 pages.
Trial and Error (Arcturus Crime Classics) - Anthony Berkeley

this sounds like a frickin' blast--terminally ill man decides to find someone he judges to be a human being unworthy to live, murders him, sees someone else charged with the crime, and works to establish that the cops have got the wrong man. I've read and enjoyed one other novel by Berkeley--that would be Before the Fact, which he wrote as Francis Iles. I wonder if this one can be even half as good, but the plot synopsis suggests there's a chance.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?