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review 2017-12-19 01:13
Strike and Robin investigating a suicide
The Cuckoo's Calling - Robert Galbraith

My latest load of books. 

 

In the attempt to get a VIP card from a local bookstore, a brand from Taiwan, I have to buy a lot. 

 

So I tried and tried to find enough books for me to buy in order to become member. This is in the pile. 

 

The surprise is how readable this is. I read the latest one Career of Evil when it went on sale. This one didn't got my interest so much as I have already watched the TV series it based on.

 

The story has a bit of problem, the detective Strike seems sad, yet didn't really have a temper. Man who had a father who hardly knows his existence, and a career cut short because of injury. One must get frustrated in life and probably has a bit of temper. He is just not a cheerful guy but didn't really take it out on anyone really. 

 

As for his detective skill, it is a bit procedural. Who was there and why? Interviewing witnesses and tried to confirm the police didn't missed anything. 

 

The problem of watching the TV series first is the spoiler. I tried to forget the end bits to enjoy the progression of the book more. 

 

The story itself didn't have enough interactive actions that I like in detective story. But this is just preference. The story itself is doing fine. I would have to find out if this is a suicide or if someone has harmed this young woman. 

 

The middle bit is a bit of running around with glues. If only Strike revealed some of the clues to Robin, then it would get even better. 

 

The ending is fine. 

 

4.5 stars read. 

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text 2017-11-30 13:15
Surprise, Surprise Bonus Joker #2: The Cuckoo Egg

THE SOLUTION:

 

It's World Peace Day (square 10) ... which isn't on December 21, but on September 21 of each year.

 

Congrats to everybody who messaged us with the correct answer -- that's one bonus point for each of you!

 

 


 

 

 

We're almost halfway into the 16 Tasks of the Festive Season, and it's time for another bonus joker ... and for 'fessing up: because we've put one over on you. 

 

Yes, that's right, one of the 32 holidays we've included in the game isn't actually set in December but ... well, when exactly, and of course which holiday it is, will be for you to find out.

 

We'll give you two hints:

 

(1) It's not one of the holidays that we've already passed, and

 

(2) It's not one of the holidays that are based on a different calendar than the Gregorian calendar, so that they could be on certain dates in November or December in one year and on other dates the next year.

 

(Oh, and it isn't Christmas.  But you'll have suspected that.)

 

Since we'd like to give as many people as possible the chance to earn a bonus point for this one, we'd ask you to PM Murder by Death or Themis-Athena your answers so the beans don't get spilled too early.

 

The joker is good from right now until 12 midnight (EST) on November 29, 2017.

 

Happy hunting!

 

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review 2017-10-31 06:43
Cuckoo Song
Cuckoo Song - Frances Hardinge

Cuckoos are interesting birds. Several species of cuckoo engage in brood parasitism, meaning they drop their eggs in other birds’ nests so those other birds will raise their young for them. Does the title of Cuckoo Song seem a trifle more disturbing now? Good. The mood is set.

 

 

This book is strange and wonderful and creepy and delightful. It makes me wish I had a time machine so I could send a copy back to the ‘80s for ten-year-old me. While it’s meant for a Middle Grade audience, it’s got plenty of appeal for older readers. Early 1920’s England comes alive in the vivid prose. It might be premature to crown Frances Hardinge the Queen of Metaphor after reading one book, but I’d say she’s definitely in the running.

 

But this isn’t just a good, creepy, dark fairy tale. It’s a good, creepy, dark fairy tale with substance. It deals with issues of family love, loss, identity, and acceptance in kind of amazing ways. My hat’s off to Hardinge. This was a delicious book that I wanted to devour but just had to savor.

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text 2017-10-23 18:54
5 spooky books you're reading right now
Cuckoo Song - Frances Hardinge
Deadline - Mira Grant
Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods: Twenty Chilling Tales from the Wilderness - Hal Johnson,Tom Mead
What the Hell Did I Just Read - David Wong
The Turn of the Screw - Henry James,Richard Armitage,Emma Thompson

9 days to Halloween. If you're wondering what to read to feel the spirit of the upcoming night, check out what BookLikes bloggers are reading right now.

 

A blogger at Darth Pony is reading Cuckoo Song by Frances Hardinge  

Cuckoo Song - Frances Hardinge

When Triss wakes up after an accident, she knows that something is very wrong. She is insatiably hungry; her sister seems scared of her and her parents whisper behind closed doors. She looks through her diary to try to remember, but the pages have been ripped out.

Soon Triss discovers that what happened to her is more strange and terrible than she could ever have imagined, and that she is quite literally not herself. In a quest to find the truth she must travel into the terrifying Underbelly of the city to meet a twisted architect who has dark designs on her family - before it's too late.

 

A blogger at isanythingopen is reading Deadline by Mira Grant 

Deadline - Mira Grant

Shaun Mason is a man without a mission. Not even running the news organization he built with his sister has the same urgency as it used to. Playing with dead things just doesn't seem as fun when you've lost as much as he has.
But when a CDC researcher fakes her own death and appears on his doorstep with a ravenous pack of zombies in tow, Shaun has a newfound interest in life. Because she brings news-he may have put down the monster who attacked them, but the conspiracy is far from dead.
Now, Shaun hits the road to find what truth can be found at the end of a shotgun.

 

A blogger at Reading For The Heck Of It is reading Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods: Twenty Chilling Tales from the Wilderness by Hal Johnson

Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods: Twenty Chilling Tales from the Wilderness - Hal Johnson,Tom Mead

Meet the snoligoster, who feeds on the shadows of its victims. The whirling whimpus, who once laid low an entire Boy Scout troop. And the hoop snake, who can chase prey at speeds of up to 60 miles per hour and then, with one sting of its venomous tail, cause it to turn purple, swell up, and—alas—die.
These and 17 other fearsome creatures are among the most fantastical beasts in American folklore. Their stories, as narrated by one of the last surviving cryptozoologists, are best enjoyed while sitting around a campfire. If you dare.

 

A blogger at What I am reading is reading What the Hell Did I Just Read - David Wong

What the Hell Did I Just Read - David Wong

From the writer of the cult sensation John Dies at the End comes another terrifying and hilarious tale of almost Armageddon at the hands of two hopeless heroes.

It’s the story “They” don’t want you to read. Though, to be fair, “They” are probably right about this one. No, don’t put the book back on the shelf – it is now your duty to purchase it to prevent others from reading it. Yes, it works with ebooks, too; I don’t have time to explain how.

While investigating a fairly straightforward case of a shape-shifting interdimensional child predator, Dave, John, and Amy realized there might actually be something weird going on. Together, they navigate a diabolically convoluted maze of illusions, lies, and their own incompetence in an attempt to uncover a terrible truth that they - like you - would be better off not knowing. Your first impulse will be to think that a story this gruesome – and, to be frank, stupid – cannot possibly be true. That is precisely the reaction “They” are hoping for.

 

A blogger behind Ani's Book Abyss is reading The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

The Turn of the Screw - Henry James,Richard Armitage,Emma Thompson

Henry James's classic ghost story The Turn of the Screwhas been enthralling readers for over a century and shows no sign of losing popularity as new generations continue to discover this chilling masterpiece.
The novella's anonymous narrator is a young woman, a parson’s daughter, who is engaged as governess to two seemingly innocent children at a remote English country house. What initially seems a idyllic soon turns nightmarish, as she becomes convinced that the children are consorting with a pair of malevolent spirits. These are the ghosts of former employees at Bly: a valet and a previous governess. In life, scandalously, the two of them had been discharged as illicit lovers, and their spectral visitations with the children hint at Satanism and possible sexual abuse. The book amply fulfills its pledge, laid down in the first few pages, that nothing can touch it in terms of sheer “dreadful—dreadfulness.”

 

What are you reading? Share the titles below.

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review 2017-09-23 03:19
The Cuckoo's Calling
The Cuckoo's Calling - Robert Galbraith

I don’t always feel the need to write detailed reviews of books that have already been reviewed up the wazoo. This is one of those times, so I’m just going to jot down some impressions I want to remember.

 

If Galbraith had never been outed as JK Rowling, I totally would have believed this book was written by a man based on nothing more than how at least 90% of the female characters were written as manipulative, conniving, spoiled bitches, including the dead woman. The male characters fall victim to the same traits, but if I wasn’t aware of the name behind the pen name, I’d probably put this down to trying to make Strike look even better by comparison. Also, accidentally grabbing a woman’s breast (hard enough to leave bruises) to save her from falling down a flight of stairs seems like something a guy would come up with (or an animé cliché). Also, Strike’s love life sometimes smacks of wish fulfillment. I didn’t make a note of every time it was mentioned how people marveled that Strike could attract such gorgeous women, but it seemed like a lot.

 

Randomness: Both Strike and the victim had a million nicknames. What’s up with that?

 

The mystery is decent, the prose is good, the dialogue is snappy. The characters are a mix of stereotyped cardboard cutouts and interesting fleshed-out individuals. The denouement felt like it dragged on for aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaages. I enjoyed it a lot more than Casual Vacancy (which I thought was well-written but meh) and I’ll continue with the series.

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