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quote 2018-08-09 05:34
“Come here, little girl. I know what you want, little girl.” It was a rustling voice, scratchy and dry. It made Coraline think of some kind of enormous dead insect. Which was silly, she knew. How could a dead thing, especially a dead insect, have a voice?

She walked through several rooms with low, slanting ceilings until she came to the final room. It was a bedroom, and the other crazy old man upstairs sat at the far end of the room, in the near darkness, bundled up in his coat and hat.

As Coraline entered he began to talk. “Nothing’s changed, little girl,” he said, his voice sounding like the noise dry leaves make as they rustle across a pavement. “And what if you do everything you swore you would? What then? Nothing’s changed. You’ll go home. You’ll be bored. You’ll be ignored. No one will listen to you, not really listen to you. You’re too clever and too quiet for them to understand. They don’t even get your name right.

“Stay here with us,” said the voice from the figure at the end of the room. “We will listen to you and play with you and laugh with you. Your other mother will build whole worlds for you to explore, and tear them down every night when you are done. Every day will be better and brighter than the one that went before. Remember the toy box? How much better would a world be built just like that, and all for you?”

“And will there be gray, wet days where I just don’t know what to do and there’s nothing to read or to watch and nowhere to go and the day drags on forever?” asked Coraline.

From the shadows, the man said, “Never.”

“And will there be awful meals, with food made from recipes, with garlic and tarragon and broad beans in?” asked Coraline.

“Every meal will be a thing of joy,” whispered the voice from under the old man’s hat. “Nothing will pass your lips that does not entirely delight you.”

“And could I have Day-Glo green gloves to wear, and yellow Wellington boots in the shape of frogs?” asked Coraline.

“Frogs, ducks, rhinos, octopuses—whatever you desire. The world will be built new for you every morning. If you stay here, you can have whatever you want.”

Coraline sighed. “You really don’t understand, do you?” she said. “I don’t want whatever I want. Nobody does. Not really. What kind of fun would it be if I just got everything I ever wanted? Just like that, and it didn’t mean anything. What then?”

“I don’t understand,” said the whispery voice.

“Of course you don’t understand,” she said, raising the stone with the hole in it to her eye. “You’re just a bad copy she made of the crazy old man upstairs.”
Coraline - Neil Gaiman,Dave McKean

I'm currently re-reading this book (I got Scribd back again!!) and I came to this scene. It really is true what Coraline says and I think we forget that. Also just because you might get everything you want... that doesn't equal happiness.

 

20764916

 

[This bit of wisdom from a Children's book (though I believe no matter your age, you should be able to read any book/books shouldn't have age limits) Coraline by Neil Gaiman.]

 

 

 

*Not sponsored:(I'm nobody) For those who don't know, Scribd is an ebook and audiobook subscription service. I really like it! They don't have the largest catalog, but enough to make the price worth it. $8.99 a month, and I think they might have a free trial. Heck, if you read or listen to one book, I believe you got your money's worth. Scribd's worldwide! You'll be able to access Scribd in any country unless local service providers or authorities have blocked it. Please note: not every title is available in every country.

 

Sharing this, because I wish I had known about it sooner!

Source: www.goodreads.com/book/show/17061.Coraline
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text 2017-11-02 22:45
October 2017 Round Up!
Cthulhu Blues (Spectra Files) - Douglas Wynne
The Age of Innocence - Edith Wharton
Halloween Carnival Volume 4 - Kealan Patrick Burke,C.A. Suleiman,Ray Garton,Brian James Freeman,Bev Vincent
Coraline - Neil Gaiman,Dave McKean
The Trials of Solomon Parker - Eric Scott Fischl
Lightning Men: A Novel - Thomas Mullen
Strange Weather: Four Short Novels - Joe Hill
Blackwater: The Complete Saga - Michael McDowell,Matt Godfrey
Henry & Glenn Forever & Ever - Tom Neely
Halloween Carnival Volume 5 - Lisa Tuttle,Kevin Quigley,Norman Prentiss,Richard Chizmar,Brian James Freeman

 

October was a crazy month here at the Horror Corner! 

 

The most important, (and beautiful thing), was that my lovely niece married her best friend of 20+ years. The ceremony was wonderful and the reception a lot of fun!

 

 

 

Then, two weeks after that was the Merrimack Valley Halloween Book Festival!

You can find my post about that HERE.

 

Here's a photo of myself with Rio Youers. Isn't he the cutest? He's also extremely gracious and very funny. 

 

All of this is why I only read 10 books this month! 

 

Graphic Novels: Henry & Glenn Forever & Ever by Tom Neely and friends.

 

Total: 1

 

Audio Books:

 

Blackwater: The Complete Saga by Michael McDowell, narrated by Matt Godfrey

The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton 

Coraline written and narrated by Neil Gaiman

 

Total: 3

 

ARCS:

 

Cthulhu Blues by Douglas Wynne

Halloween Carnival: Volume 4

Halloween Carnival: Volume 5

The Trials of Solomon Parker by Eric Scott Fischl

Lightning Men by Thomas Mullen

Strange Weather by Joe Hill

 

Total: 6

 

 

READING CHALLENGES

 

Horror Aficionados Mount TBR Challenge: 

(Horror Aficionados Group on Goodreads)

Goal: Read 40 books I already own in 2017

 

 

January Count: 1

February Count: 2 

March and April Count: 0

May: 2 (Boo! and The Well)

June & July: 0

August: 1-The Talented Mr. Ripley

September: 1  Carter & Lovecraft

October 0 (But had LOTS of fun with Halloween Bingo!)

Running Count: 7

 

Graphic Novel Challenge:

(Paced Reading Group on GR)

Goal: Read 25 Graphic novels in 2017 

 

January count: 5

February count: 2

March count: 5

April count: 5

May count: 3

June count: 4

July count: 4

August count: 5

September: 1

October: 1

 

Running Count: 35! Challenge Met!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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review 2017-09-28 00:00
The Graveyard Book
The Graveyard Book - 'Dave McKean',Neil Gaiman I think this is the third Neil Gaiman book I've read, and I think I have a weird relationship with his books. I find myself loving the story, loving some of the characters, and enjoying some of the writing...but I also kind of hate his writing :/ I don't know how to explain it (my husband gets it, though), but it's like I feel like there's too much and not enough detail. Too much of things I don't care much about, and not enough for the things in the story I find most interesting.

Anyway...I really liked this book, and I wish it had been around when I was a kid. I probably would have loved it more back then. It wasn't really what I was expecting, even though I actually went into this only knowing "there's a kid who lives(?) in a cemetery with ghosts or ghouls or something, even though he's alive."

I loved the setting. The graveyard was really interesting especially the way Bod was kind of part of it, and could move around like the ghosts, and so were the many ghosties we met. I really would have liked more details about some things, though like how the whole thing with Bod being able to pass through walls and stuff actually worked.

The characters were great. I liked Bod, loved most of the ghosts, and really would have liked to know more about Silas and Miss Lupescu and the Jacks, because that just kept confusing the hell out of me. Liza was my favorite, though. I'm not sure why, but I really liked her.

I'm still just kind of confused about stuff. I don't know if I'm over-thinking or what, but I felt way less satisfied by this than I thought I would. I kept waiting for things to be explained a little more, or for something to make sense, and it never did. While I can enjoy a bit of mystery and leaving things to the imagination, with this one...it honestly kind of felt lazy, like the reader should dream up huge chunks of the plot. I'm not a fan of that. What was the deal with the prophecy or whatever it was? How can Bod move around the cemetery like he does? What the hell were the Jacks? Why could Scarlett and that other girl (Mo?) notice Bod when he Faded, but other people couldn't? Why could Bod see the ghosts for so long, but then suddenly couldn't when he was 15? What was the Sleer? Who was buried in the mound? So many questions. And I still feel like the whole bit with the ghouls was unnecessary. I thought it was going to be important later, but it never was. I mean, sure, Bod opened the gate, but he could have easily learned how to do that from Miss Lupescu or someone. Speaking of her, what was she fighting with Silas? Were they Jacks, or what?

Basically, I think my problem with Gaiman's books is that I read them and feel like my book had missing chapters. Lots of them. I'll almost certainly continue to read them, but I think I need to go into them not expecting to be satisfied at the end.
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review 2017-09-12 08:02
Slog's Dad
Slog's Dad - David Almond,Dave McKean

I first read this story in Almond's Half a Creature from the Sea. I enjoyed it then. I enjoyed the story this time too (it's the same story), but I didn't connect with the illustrator's style. The pictures didn't add to my reading/understanding of the story.

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text 2017-07-13 13:30
Nonfiction Science Book Club: Some More Suggestions
Aladdin's Lamp: How Greek Science Came to Europe Through the Islamic World - John Freely
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind - Yuval Noah Harari
The Riddle of the Compass: The Invention That Changed the World - Amir D. Aczel
The Inheritor's Powder: A Cautionary Tale of Poison, Betrayal and Greed - Sandra Hempel
The Abacus and the Cross: The Story of the Pope Who Brought the Light of Science to the Dark Ages - Nancy Marie Brown
The Age of Wonder - Richard Holmes
The Dilemmas of an Upright Man: Max Planck and the Fortunes of German Science - J. L. Heilbron
The Magic of Reality: How We Know What's Really True - Dave McKean,Richard Dawkins
The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World - Michael Pollan
The Science of Everyday Life - Marty Jopson

... just because there are already plenty to choose from anyway! :)

 

Mainly, but not exclusively "history of science" entries here.

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