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review 2015-12-14 00:00
Roomie
Roomie - Jayson Wintergreene

Before I say anything else, can I just mention that somebody needs to fix this blurb! Now. I have no idea how or I'd do it, but the mistakes have to go! This book is really good and it's a shame how that blurb doesn't show in any way. At least the names should be correct, FGS. *now back to the book


Surprise, Surprise! I so didn't see this one coming!


Jayson Wintergreen was a completely new author to me, and this book seems to be his/her debut novel. And as such, it really surprised the crap out of me.

I have to admit, the 1st POV in present tense is not exactly my favorite. I was able to get into the story despite of it, but every now and again it did bug me a little. Also, I have a hard time reading a book when there are no pragraphs, spaces or anything really, separating one situation from the other. Most of the time it wasn't that big of an issue here, because I was able to determine what's what pretty quickly, but at one point or the other some kind of indication would have been nice, or maybe even necessary, just to make reading a lot easier.

One big issue was the word "like". Like, using it all the time, like, really. Like, even in sex scenes?! Dude! Like, so not cool. As you can tell, I am not a fan of the usage of "like" in every sentence, even if it doesn't make a lick of sense there. I know, it's conntemporary, and I understand that it's even realistic ina away, because many people tend to use it extensively. It still annoys me in my books, mostly because as an "outsider" I find it an irritating distraction. Especially in the bedroom, this word has to GO. Absolutely not my thing.

But these are basically all of my complaints. Sure, some tighter editing and proof reading would do this some good and make it an exceptional story, but in the end, I didn'T care so much all of the technicalities anymore. Because this book? Was. Great. I loved the characters so much, after a while my little niggles didn't matter half as much. Leo was adorable, he warmed my heart and made me smile a loon during my lunch break. Charlie was the goofball of the story, but in a very sincere and empathetic way. He was so good to his new, painfully shy roommate. This guy who was looking for a neat and quiet tenant, but got a great friend with a big heart instead. And a not so tiny crush.

"Hey, man. I'm Charlie," he says hoping to come off as both neat and quiet and as a non-smoker, all in that first initial greeting.



These two together killed me in the best ways. From the forming of a very tentative friendship to the first dipping of toes into deeper waters, I enjoyed the hell out of their journey. Le, the shy writer with a lot of insecurities, had a very hard time trusting anyone, but especially big and loud, outgoing Charlie who - on the other hand - has this incredibly sweet and caring side. Threw Leo every. Single. Time. But Charlie prevailed. He cared, he loved, he laughed, he struggled and he fought, and it was all worth it. Of course there were bumps in the road, some bigger than others. Things both men had to overcome, had to compromise on, had to fight for. Especially Charlie, who had a penchant for letting people walk over him in order to keep the peace and everybody happy.

Granted, the final "conflict"was very unusual, not only in its origin, but also in the way it developed and was blown a little out of proportion, IMHO. BUT. It all made sense in the end, and while the final scenes might have been a little cheesy and sugar-y weet, it didn't spoil my reading experience at all. I rooted so hard for these two, I was too happy to see their HEA.

All in all, I know that some readers will probably dnf this book, because the writing, the tense, and the editing issues will put them off. I can't really blame them, because there are quite some niggles. BUT. I can only advise absolutely everyone who likes a slow burn, young adult roommates, some hurt and comfort, sexy steam and a whole lot of feelings to READ IT. Read through it, don't give a crap about the technicalities and enjoy the sweet and wonderful MCs here. It's worth it. It will probably take some time to get used to the different style, but if you ask me? These two guys and their story make more than up for it.

Definitely recommended! A really great debut novel that I enjoyed immensely! And I'll just give it 5 stars, because even though I had issues - under other cirsumstances this would probably be more like a 3.5 star read - I still loved this and just can't help myself.

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text 2015-11-04 02:33
Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Debut Authors Who Have Me Looking Forward To Their Next Novel
The Wrath and the Dawn - Renee Ahdieh
An Ember in the Ashes - Sabaa Tahir
Scarlett Undercover - Jennifer Latham
The Martian - Andy Weir
Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened - Allie Brosh
Quiet. The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking - Susan Cain
Lies We Tell Ourselves - Robin Talley
Everything, Everything - Nicola Yoon
The Golem and the Djinni - Helene Wecker
The Crown - Colleen Oakes

This topic is brought to you, every Tuesday, by The Broke and the Bookish - I'm just answering these things because they're fun and it's awesome to hear what other people have to say on the topics each week.

 

This week has me answering the prompt: Top Ten Debut Authors Who Have Me Looking Forward To Their Next/Sophomore Novel.  Dude, this is hard, because so many authors I've read have had multiple books out, but that doesn't mean I can't include debut authors whose books I haven't read, but I'm looking forward to the sequel.

 

No particular order here, just going off the top of my head.

 

An Ember in the Ashes - Sabaa Tahir 

 

1. Sabaa Tahir:  I had some issues with "An Ember in the Ashes", but I also liked the story and found myself invested in the characters well enough to see where the series would go. I'm hoping that as the series goes on, it builds in strength (and leans less on some of the problematic turns of the story - or at least treats them a little better than the first book did).

 

The Wrath and the Dawn - Renee Ahdieh 

 

2. Renee Adieh: I'm already too excited over the release of the follow-up book to "The Wrath and the Dawn", but I've still yet to write a review for the first book.  Argh.  Both of the covers for this book are beautiful, and I love stories set with this theme so, so much.

 

Scarlett Undercover - Jennifer Latham 

 

3. Jennifer Latham: I really liked 'Scarlett Undercover," and I'd like to see where her next project takes her.  I think the biggest appeal of Scarlett was her character voice, which is something Latham did very well in shaping the character.

 

The Martian - Andy Weir 

 

4. Andy Weir - I think I've determined that I'll read anything that Andy Weir writes from here on out, because "The Martian" is one of my all-time favorite books. Really looking forward to what his next major book project will be.

 

Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened - Allie Brosh 

 

5. Allie Brosh:  Because I loved "Hyperbole and a Half" - no shame.  I'd love to read another humor book in the style of the aforementioned.

 

Quiet. The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking - Susan Cain 

 

6. Susan Cain: Because she's so articulate about the experiences of introverts/introversion.  I really enjoyed "Quiet" and I've heard she's releasing another book next year along the same lines.  I can't wait to read it.

 

Lies We Tell Ourselves - Robin Talley 

 

7. Robin Talley: Because I thought "LIes We Tell Ourselves" was absolutely fantastic. Can't wait to see what she writes next (and I have a galley of her next novel, so even better!)

 

Everything, Everything - Nicola Yoon 

 

8. Nicola Yoon: I haven't read "Everything, Everything" in its entirety, but what I've read so far makes me want to read more from her in the future.

 

The Golem and the Djinni - Helene Wecker 

 

9. Helene Wecker: Because while I haven't read "The Golem and the Jinni" in its entirety, I'd just really like to read more from her based on her style and the theme of this book.

 

and lastly:

 

The Crown - Colleen Oakes 

 

10. Colleen Oakes: Yeah, technically her sophomore novel is already out, but I haven't had the chance to read it, so it's new to me.  But I love her style of writing and I'd like to read more books from her in the near future.

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review 2014-05-14 06:22
The Paradox of Vertical Flight
The Paradox of Vertical Flight - Emil Ostrovski

There is something terrifying yet absolutely comforting about coming across a character that seems to be of equal mind to mine. Or maybe it's the author's thoughts that might as well have been pulled out of my very own mind. Not that I could have written this tale but the voice! That voice was like echoes of my own. Not to say either that I would ever think of kidnapping a baby (even if it were my own) to travel cross-country, so that my grandmother might meet this baby. I think this premise did make for a rather far-fetched plot but in the interest of the book, I decided to stretch my suspension of disbelief a little more than I usually do. In doing so, I think I really came to appreciate what The Paradox of Vertical Flight is about.

The Paradox of Vertical Flight itself is a fairly short book. 256 pages at 1.5 line spacing, so it’s easy to fly through the book. Yet, I’d say to fully appreciate it, it’d be best to sit in a quiet corner with more than a couple of hours to spare when reading it. This way there’s time to let all the words wash over you and the space to let your mind wander. That is because I find that what made this book so great for me is that it made me think about my own life and the things that should matter more and the things that should matter less.

The father of the baby came to name the baby Socrates. It didn’t matter to him if others would accept the name. All that mattered was that he could call him Socrates. If that name choice is any indication, the narrative bordered on the philosophical for a good part of the book. Those who enjoy philosophy will recognize a lot of the theories weaved into the book. Yet it did not become so inaccessible that anyone who has never learned any philosophy will not understand the musings of the main character.

What I liked best about The Paradox of Vertical Flight is that it gives a lot of credit to the reader. It expects an intellectual involvement that exceeds many YA books. Instead of a plain retelling of events, there is also a great focus on the things a teenager thinks about. Sure, boys will be boys and all that but despite all the stupid things teenagers do (like getting his ex-girlfriend pregnant in this case), they do have more mature thoughts than many adults like to believe. I wasn’t surprised then when I found out that the author himself is only in his early twenties. I think that allowed him to encapsulate the thoughts, emotions and actions of this 18-year-old so perfectly.

 

This review is also available at dudettereads.com.

Source: dudettereads.com/2014/02/review-the-paradox-vertical-flight-by-emil-ostrovski
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review 2013-10-18 15:18
Review: Not a Drop to Drink
Not a Drop to Drink - Mindy McGinnis

Some spoilers, nothing major.

It is highly frustrating when a book that screams potential fails to live up to it. Not a Drop to Drink could have been something bold and off-beat but alas, McGinnis just had to squeeze in unnecessary cliches and kill the originality.

Not a Drop to Drink describes an apocalypse that is chilling in its plausibility - no drinking water. In Lynn's world, having a pond in your backyard is akin to having an unlocked safe that everyone knows about and wants a share of. Survival does not come with a list of alternatives. Either kill to defend what you have or die trying. If you have nothing, take what you can by force or die from a parched throat.

It's a hard life in a bleak world for Lynn, and the only person she shares it with is her mother. Hardened by circumstance, these women spend hours on the roof scoping the horizon for strangers and shoot without hesitation whenever someone gets too close. They do their own hunting, grow their own vegetables, chop their own firewood, drink from their own pond.

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