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Search tags: depression-era
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text 2017-12-15 22:41
Currently Reading... and reading, and reading...

Books are my escapism. I love them. They are life. Except...

 

 

I've been currently reading the same book for what feels like ages, well for the whole of December, so really only a couple weeks. It isn't as if I don't like the book. I have no idea why I procrastinate something I love so much! I go through spurts of reading 20+ books in a month, and then reading like 2 and sometimes nothing at all!

 

I recently found out some of my "quirks" come down to autism. Shocker. 33 and I'm only now finding out who I really am, or at least understanding more why I do things the way I do them. The more correct term would be ASD or Asperger Syndrome Disorder.

 

People can call me a special snowflake all they want. I finally have a term, or label (if you will) that helps me understand my head a little better. I did not get it officially told to me by a doctor, either.

 

First I got advice from a friend who has it and she gently told me to look more into it, because apparently aspies are really good at recognizing each other. What she did not know was that I had already been wondering about it and when she gave me this long message talking about her experiences and relating them to what she has seen me do, I just couldn't control the melt down I had while reading it.

 

Like I feel ashamed and broken, but rationally, I know there is nothing to be ashamed of and I'm not broken. It is just another part of me. One that 90% of people won't take seriously because I'm a grown woman, and I didn't get a "Doctor's Note."

 

This hardly has anything to do with books. I was wondering if non bookish blogs are fine, considering this blog site is called "booklikes"

 

Anyone else share non bookish stuff? Is that frowned on here? I sometimes have things I want to blurt to people and nobody to blurt them to.

 

Oh, I wanted to share my current saving grace is the La La Land soundtrack. I put that music on full blast when I am having "moments" where I want to ignore the world. Go see the movie and make the music your life!! All music is my saving grace, but I really love this soundtrack. I'm really into the music I grew up with, the 90s/early 00s, plus a few more modern things. I'm still trying to wrap my head around the fact that some people are calling the 90s the oldies now.

Image result for la la land

 

I hope everyone is having a great holiday season!


Leigha~

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text 2017-12-13 15:32
A Poetry Kind of Day

It has been a long time since I have been able to write poetry. It is an art form I don't always understand. I like to read it, but it is usually hit and miss whether I like it or not. So I've been going through stuff, so I wrote some poems recently. I'm sharing them with you.

 

---

 

Agonizing, Torment, Panic

All this because the Internet went out

Bored, Lonely, Sad

All this because the Internet went out

What to do, What to do?

Why are we stuck in an age

where Wi-Fi breathes us life

defines us, controls us?

The minute it goes

we freeze and

forget how to live.

 

design, desk, display

 

---

 

too much

suffocating, surrounding,

desire owning, having

overwhelming, intoxicating

 

unable to toss it away

too many leftovers of a past

unwanted memories of a life

 

struggling

let it go, go, go

get away

 

usefulness

dried up, gone

not needed

 

trash it, give it, clean it up

 

not only physical,

in the mind

as well

 

memories with people

not things

 

go ahead

take pictures

take videos

 

try

device down

once in a while

 

enjoy moment

record everything

forget to

really live it

 

pictures and video

are things too

stock photo, broken, glass, clean, mess, stock, broken-glass, clean-up, dust-pan, minimalism, excuse-our-mess

 

 ---

 

music, loud, love

headphones, my friend,

savior, comfort me

thank you

 

scary, too crazy

ouch, pain

people

hide, be quiet,

shh

 

better to, like to,

want to, hate to

ignore the world

 

confusing, conflicting

wants, desires

 

Woman with headphones listening music

 

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review 2017-11-18 13:57
Secrets For The Mad by Dodie Clark
Secrets for the Mad - Dodie Clark

 

You can tell that Dodie is not a professional writer, not that this is written badly by any means. There are just some parts that drag a little or the wording is a little odd and doesn't flow too well. I still really enjoy the book.

I love her as a person, and enjoy getting to know more about her, at least the stuff she was willing to share in this book, and it seemed she shared quite a lot! Thanks Dodie. We need to talk more about stuff like this so people know we're important, too. Invisible illnesses are the worst, because nobody believes us.

I relate to the mental health stuff she is going through, though I do not have the exact same mental disorder she has. It makes me so sad to know someone as nice as Dodie feels as bad as I feel, if not worse (at times) because of her fame and differences in her life.

This book makes it even more clear how strong and brave Dodie is. It's not easy to share your innermost feelings, let alone with millions of strangers. I do not know if she fully realizes how much of a role model she is to people of all ages. She seems like such a humble person. Of course this is from what I see of her online personality and this book.

One of the things in the book that I liked is how she talked about being able to find humor even during the worst of times. We've got to be able to laugh and sometimes we need that humor to get through tough situations.

She stresses about how important self care is. This is something I really agree with, but often forget, so I am glad she talks about it.

The poetry and song lyrics were a great touch. I also loved the photos and drawings scattered throughout. I can only imagine how pretty the physical book will be.

My final thoughts: If you are a Dodie fan, you might like this! Even if you do not know her, you might relate if you suffer from mental health issues. I do feel this is written for a teenage audience, but who cares about age. I hope all ages can love this and get to know Dodie.

 

 

Side Note: Unrelated to the book, I really adore Dodie and her music!

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review 2017-11-18 10:25
Depression & Other Magic Tricks by Sabrina Benaim
Depression & Other Magic Tricks - Sabrina Benaim

I read this book in one sitting, even when I hadn't planned on reading much at all. I was just going to read a poem or two to see how I felt about the book. I was sucked right in. The poems are touching, heartbreaking, and hard to read at times, because I relate to them so much. The poem about explaining depression to your mother really resonated with me.

The writing style is different if you do not read a lot of poetry. I could feel the emotion and pain behind the words, even for the poems I could not personally understand.

Beautifully written.

*Got from Netgally in return for a review*

 

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review 2017-11-17 16:58
Fathers and sons in America: A Matt Phelan Masterpost
Bluffton - Matt Phelan
The Storm in the Barn - Matt Phelan

I had said in last week's post that today I'd be writing a Matt Phelan 'masterpost'. Typically this means that I cover 3+ books by a single author (or multiple authors writing together in a series). However, today I'm just going to talk about 2 books because honestly that's all I could get my hands on and so that's all I managed to read. :-) I picked up Bluffton: My Summers with Buster Keaton and The Storm in the Barn with fairly high expectations based on the work I had seen by Phelan in the Comics Squad compilation I read and reviewed not too long ago. On the one hand, I was not at all disappointed. The illustration style is most definitely up my street. He is excellent at drawing evocative expressions on people's faces. I think where I was let down was on the overall reading experience. Let me take each of the books separately so that I can (hopefully) explain what I mean.

 

I read Bluffton first because it featured a circus and I am all about that circus lifestyle. Firstly, when I grabbed this book I somehow missed the subtitle and therefore was shocked to discover that one of the main characters in this book is that famous star of vaudeville, Buster Keaton. Secondly, I went into this book expecting a rollicking good time and instead got a somewhat borderline depressing narrative of what the childhood of Buster would have entailed since he was a performer from infancy. It's about the expectations that a parent has for their child and how those might be vastly different from the aspirations that the child holds for themselves. It's also about the nature of friendship and jealousy (especially when one of the friends is an itinerant performer). It's a coming of age tale that paints a rather grim picture of child stardom and how the experiences of our youth shape us into the adults that we will one day become.

 

Then there was The Storm in the Barn which I can only categorize as a Debbie Downer type of book. I'm not sure that this falls under any one genre. It's most certainly historical fiction as it depicts a little boy, his family, and his community as they struggle during the time of the Dust Bowl in Kansas circa 1937. However, it also contains fantasy elements of which I can't really go into without spoiling the plot... It's certainly rooted in reality because Phelan does not shy away from the harsh conditions that these characters face (don't even get me started on the rabbits). He covers bullying from both peers and parents. The protagonist is forced to watch a beloved sister struggle with a possibly fatal illness. The entire plot is fraught with tension and a dark cloud seems to hover over every page. What I'm trying to say is that if you're looking for a light read to send your tots to sleep at night then you should probably keep looking. BUT if you wanted to teach your kids about an era of history that's not usually dwelt upon in the classroom then this might indeed be the right selection for you.

 

I'd rate both books about the same. In terms of imagery and writing, they're both 10/10. The issue is that I held expectations about these books (as readers do from time to time) and I finished both of these feeling somewhat let down. I understand that not all books are going to be rosy, sweet, and fun. I know that not every book has a happy ending. And yet when these two books delivered hardship, sadness, and loss I was ill prepared and disgruntled. I can't honestly flaw these books and say that from a reviewer's standpoint they were faulty...but I still find it difficult to give them full marks just the same. Does this make sense? I guess my point is that a book can tick off all the boxes and still fall short based on the assumptions of the reader and/or their relative mood when they picked up the book. ¯_(ツ)_/¯

 

Now let's take a look at Buster from Bluffton followed by a page from The Storm in the Barn:

 

Source: YouTube

 

 

Source: books4school

 

What's Up Next: Ghost Waltz: A Family Memoir by Ingeborg Day

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Kid Authors: True Tales of Childhood from Famous Writers by David Stabler

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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