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review 2017-06-29 02:27
Silence the Bird, Silence the Keeper
Silence the Bird, Silence the Keeper - Christopher David Rosales
In a future, dystopian world, the city of Los Angeles is a dangerous place where the authoritarian  military and the guerrillas are in constant battle.  In this Los Angeles, a young man, Rudy the Third, also known as Tre, finds quick and easy money working for the guerrillas as an assassin.  Tre is the son to a professor who may sometimes teach things that the military would rather he not teach and the brother to an extraordinarily smart sister who finds herself in love with a military Captain.  When Tre receives a hit on his father, things begin to get confusing and Tre begins to question his place in life.
 
We are immediately thrown into a scary world that draws many parallels to today's world and issues.  This book took me a little while to get into, the narrative is a story being told from mother to son, who is not concerned about why the world is the way it is or how it got that way.  Therefore, I didn't know where exactly we were in time or why Los Angeles is the way it is.  The aspects that did absorb me into the book were the dramatic and graphic assaults as well as the emotions of the characters.  Each character goes on an emotional rollercoaster and the journey is in their experiences.  I did find myself gravitating to Tre's sister, Nora throughout the book and was very interested in the decisions that she would make.  Overall, a raw and passionate story of revolution. 
 
This book was received for free in return for an honest review. 
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review 2017-06-23 22:33
Surprisingly up my alley
Archangel #1 (of 5) - William Gibson,Tula lotay,Butch Guice

War stories and thrillers aren't usually my dig, but I was into this. I will definitely seek out the rest of this to see how it ends. Time-traveling soldiers, mystery, the end of the world. Yeah, it got me thinking. Worth the read. 

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review 2017-06-20 19:49
A symbiosis of the genres of the noir detective novel and science-fiction with a hero with a dark-sense of humour and a heart
The Last Detective - Brian Cohn

Thanks to Rosie Amber for organising Rosie’s Book Review Team and for providing this great opportunity for reviewers and authors to meet. If you’re an author, check here how to submit your books to the team.

I don’t read many purely science-fiction books (I’m not a big fan of lengthy descriptions, and world-building can take a fair amount of space while I generally care more for characters) but I’ve read a few recently that I’ve enjoyed, enough to make me pay more attention to sci-fi offerings. Some novels combine sci-fi with other genres and that usually brings them onto more familiar territories. This novel is one of those cases. It is a fairly classical (in style) noir detective novel:  you have the disenchanted detective who has left the police disappointed with the way things are done now (in his case, though, there was an alien invasion on Earth that all but destroyed Humanity’s achievements and progress over centuries [no electricity, limited access to fuel, no telephones, no TV, no democracy]… Humans have become prisoners, rationing of food has come back, and aliens control access to the few resources left, and they send humans to ‘labor camps’ somewhere outside of Earth with some cooperation from the human ‘authorities’) and who is called back because he’s the only one who can solve a murder. Now that the police have become no more than puppets of the aliens (also called ‘slicks’, because of the peculiar aspect of their skin), there is nobody else who still remembers how things were done. This is a DIY police procedural novel (no computers, no DNA analysis or blood tests, only very basic gathering of evidence and use of deductive powers, almost back to Conan Doyle or Christie) with a main characters, Adrian Grace (a very apt name, as we discover), who has probably lost everything and who describes himself as being ‘addicted’ to detective work. There might be other reasons (read excuses) why he chooses to accept the case of the murder of a Slick (they have somewhat of a herd mentality and do not hurt each other but it seems unthinkable that a human would dare to try and kill one of them) but the main one is because he misses being a detective.

The story is told in the first person, present tense, from Grace’s point of view, and it follows the chronological order, with the main action taking place over only a few days. Although he has fallen quite low, he hasn’t reached the level of others, and he is smart, witty, and has a rather black sense of humour that is what keeps him going.  Although he does not dwell for too long on his circumstances, or those of humanity (the novel starts with a brief chapter that takes place right at the moment when the aliens arrive, that allows us a glimpse into Grace’s work before normal life came to an end, and we get to meet his partner, Yuri, who is missing by the time the main action of the novel starts), he is harder in appearance than in reality. He trusts his instincts; he suspects everybody but is also quick to believe in first impressions and happily accepts as a partner a young female detective, whom he trusts from very early on (because he needs somebody to trust). Grace reminded me of many of the hard-boiled detectives of old, but he is not violent by nature and avoids guns if he can help it, and in contrast to more modern models, he is witty but not foul-mouthed. He drip-feeds us details about his life (he was brought up a Catholic, he was married with kids, he talks about his mother’s death when he explains his lack of faith…) and he still looks after his father. His relation with his father is heart-warming, despite the terrible situation, and it only reinforces the fact that we are dealing with a human being and not a collection of clichés. Although I’m very partial to unreliable narrators, Grace is not one of them, at least not by design. This being a mystery, we are not always given always given all the information, but if we are misguided, it is because Grace is mistaken or wrong-footed (by others or himself).

The book is not heavy on descriptions and the world the book describes is like a ghost of our world, like those empty and abandoned towns we sometimes see on TV that have fallen prey to disasters (economic, natural, or man-made). We have human beings that have lost their purpose, groups of religious extremists (the Abandoned, who sustain God has abandoned Humanity), resistance groups, and the aliens can also function as stand-ins for many dictatorial regimes bent on the destruction of all opposition (Nazi Germany comes to mind, but many other, recent and distant, would also fit the bill). Some of the humans are complicit with the regime whilst others are not what they seem to be. The book allows for reflections on the nature of society, politics, religion (there is a priest that plays an important part), family, betrayal, guilt, and ultimately hope. Grace is not always right, but he has not lost his humanity, and he is a realistic character we would all like to befriend.

This is a tremendous book, where the science-fiction and the detective genre work in symbiosis and create a novel that is more than the sum of its parts. Recommended to fans of both genres, especially those who don’t mind experimentation within the genre, and in general to people who enjoy fiction that pushes them to think whilst keeping them turning the pages.

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review 2017-06-20 18:06
The Prey by Tom Isbell - Flawed but Enjoyable
The Prey - Tom Isbell

THE PREY by Tom Isbell is the first book in the Prey series, and a book that has received a lot of hate since it’s debut in 2015. It is a story about a group of teenagers that decide to fight for a life of freedom against impossible odds in dystopian America. Ultimately, I enjoyed this novel, but there were definite issues with the book that makes it understandable why so many readers did not enjoy the book. I struggled to keep reading it, myself.

 

The first issue I ran across was the grammar. There was an abundance of sentence fragments and unnecessary imagery that didn't add much to the story line except redundancy. A few examples:

 

  • “Blood. Purpling. Coagulating before his eyes." 
  • "other vehicles had arrived, disgorging brown-shirted soldiers"
  • "[they] slid him into the Humvee like a pan of dough going into an oven." 

 

I'm all for figurative language to help develop the plot, the world building, and character development.... but some things just don't need describing. While I was able to overlook the grammar, I was almost unable to finish the book due to the excruciatingly slow moving plot. It took 19 chapters to finally hook me. NINETEEN. I must have put the book down a dozen times because anything else was more entertaining then reading THE PREY. The writing style had me convinced it was going to be a fast-paced read, but don't be fooled - it's not. However, I am thankful I was able to motivate myself to finish the book, because once things started moving, I could not put it down.

 

“If you want to change something, change it. Yesterday was yesterday, today is today.”

Before we start chatting characters, let me explain a little bit about the world this book is set in. The Republic of the True America is the new government that was formed after The United States was bombed with electromagnetic radiation that fried everything electronic and ruined the country. After the new Republic took over, they separated survivors into settlement camps and — like your typical dystopian government — blamed all their issues on Less Thans and brainwashed the public into fearing  the next Omega (the day the world as they knew it ended) would be their fault, too.

 

Who is a Less Than, you ask? Homosexuals, people of color, those disfigured by radiation, political dissidents, people of non-approved religious affiliations, the mentally disabled — anyone different. Kinda familiar, isn't it?

 

THE PREY follows two sets of characters — Book and his fellow LT brethren at Camp Liberty, a settlement that raises Less Thans to be hunted for sport when they become of age, and twin sisters Hope & Faith as they are on the run from the Republic and trying to survive. The chapters told from Book's point of view is a first person narrative, while the girls' is third person. It didn't get in the way of my enjoyment, but it was a little bit strange at first.

 

It took me a good dozen chapters to figure out the main cast members of the novel, and even more so for me to sort through my feelings for them. Book and Hope are without a doubt the main characters, and so is Cat, who played a crucial part in their survival.

 

Book is by far my favorite main character. He is bookish, courageous, and cares about the survival of others. I have fairly mixed feelings about Hope. She's your stereotypical badass heroine that you see in a lot of YA science fiction these days. Her attitude towards her sister and other characters that weren't quite as extraordinary might have been realistic, but it rubbed me the wrong way. Cat I wound up liking more than I thought I would. He was an asshole at first, but as the book progresses and we learned more about him, I grew more fond of him.

 

There is a long list of secondary characters, but only a few of them actually add to the development of the story. Dozer is one such secondary character that I could not stand. He was whiny, argumentative, and created conflict among the others. I hope he doesn't appear much in book two.

 

I definitely struggled finishing this novel. It took a long while for me to feel invested in the characters — and to want to keep reading. I can't say THE PREY is my new favorite, but I will be reading book two - and hoping the writing progresses as the series does.

 

This review first appeared on A Weebish Book Blog

Source: aweebishbookblog.wordpress.com
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review 2017-06-18 18:55
My Good Boy by Samanddeanfan1
My Good Boy - Samanddeanfan1

An engaging fanfic in which widowed father of three Jensen takes on sixteen year old slave Jared with the intention of giving him a better life.

Source: archiveofourown.org/works/7304845?view_full_work=true
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