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review 2016-11-19 15:13
The Twelve Tasks of the Festive Season -- Task the Eleventh: The Polar Express
Murder on the Orient Express: Complete & Unabridged (Audiocd) - Agatha Christie

 

- Read a book that involves train travel (such as Murder on the Orient Express).

 

Well, as it happened I did pick Murder on the Orient Express for this square.  Not that I'm not intimately familiar with the story as such already -- it was actually one of the first books by Agatha Christie that I ever read, not to mention watching (and owning) the screen adaptation starring Albert Finney and half of classic Hollywood's A list.  But I'd never listened to the audio version read by David Suchet, and I am very glad to finally have remedied that now.  Not only is Suchet the obvious choice to read any of Christie's Poirot novels because his name has practically become synonymous with that of the little Belgian himself -- great character actor that he is, he was obviously also having the time of his life with all of the story's other roles, including those of the women; and particularly so, Mrs. Hubbard, whose interpretation by Suchet also gives the listener more than a minor glance at the fun that recent London audiences must have been having watching him appear as Lady Bracknell in Oscar Wilde's Importance of Being Earnest (drag and all). 

 

A superb reading of one of Agatha Christie's very best mysteries and one of my all-time favorite books.  Bravo, Mr. Suchet!

 

Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

Merken

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text 2015-05-17 09:56
Reading progress update: I've read 25 out of 595 pages.
Eastern Europe!: Everything You Need to Know About the History (and More) of a Region that Shaped Our World and Still Does - Tomek E. Jankowski

(Hello everybody. I am not dead yet. There was just an unfortunate combination of me being busy with university, me getting a cold and me getting into the Daredevil TV-show and getting so obsessed with it that I binge-read ALL THE Daredevil fanfiction).

 

This book is really fascinating and brings up so much things I never even thought about. For example that the choice between writing Slavic X language with Cyrillic letters and language Y with Latin ones wasn't necessary a logical-phonetical choice but a political one and that some countries switched alphabets at one point or another (or tried to).

It should have been sort of obvious because I know that e.g. Serbian and Croatian are so closely related that they're mostly mutually intelligible (and we still have a 'Teach yourself Serbo-Croatian' course lying around somewhere) but Croatian uses Latin and Serbian Cyrillic (and so many added extra letters/accents. Both of them).

Yes. That's the kind of stuff Slavic Studies students find fascinating.

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text 2015-02-20 19:01
A Free Thriller For You!

My favorite of the Ellie Foreman series is available free for a limited time. Both Ellie Foreman and Georgia Davis work together to solve the murder of a young woman caught on surveillance tape.

 

If that interests you, here's where to go:

 

http://libbyhellmann.com/libby-fischer-hellmans-newsletter/

 

Thanks!

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review 2014-03-09 16:50
Review of Iron Curtain by Anne Applebaum
Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956 - Anne Applebaum

I had really been looking forward to reading this book but finish it feeling a bit disappointed. I hate being critical of history books because I know how much time and effort go into them, but this book was difficult to get through for me. Applebaum obviously knows her stuff, and her knowledge of languages and cultures certainly helps on a book dealing with Eastern European peoples.

 

The book is set up thematically, and that is where I struggled with it. It focuses on the Sovietization of three countries following WWII; East Germany, Poland, and Hungary. Rather than deal with the history of these countries chronologically, each chapter takes one aspect of Communist rule and discusses it at length. I find books much more difficult to follow when set up this way, and I find that many people and ideas repeat themselves from one chapter to the next. My knowledge of the leaders in these countries is very limited, and I had hoped for an introduction to them and their actions. Instead, the names of the leading players in these countries come in and out so often it makes it very hard to follow.

 

With all of that said, I still learned a great deal but wish I could have taken more from the read.

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review 2014-03-06 00:28
grrramazon censorship still at play!
Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956 [Hardcover] [2012] (Author) Anne Applebaum -

Please note - all the comments regarding this book have been removed and I have not been informed by grramazon. It took an observant flister to point it out.

So we are still being censored folks!

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