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review 2018-08-14 21:30
Nobody's Baby But Mine
Nobody's Baby but Mine - Susan Elizabeth Phillips
A friend lent me this book and I needed a book with a baby on the cover for Ripped Bodice Bingo. I'm using this shitty book for that square! And here's why I thought it was a shitty book: rant ahead. And maybe a little spoilery. And maybe a little cussing. You've been warned.

So, Jane. Jane is a GENIUS and DESPERATELY wants a baby. So does she do what a NORMAL person would do? Fuck no! Why would one use a sperm bank (don't cha know that medical students are notorious for sperm donation?!) when one could trick an unsuspecting guy instead?! Now, granted, she doesn't get pregnant the first time when she sabotaged a condom. No, that happens the second time when they have unprotected sex. But, see it's okay becomes she didn't enjoy herself. Amiright? 
The whole "I'm super smart and it was hard for me growing up, so I want a less intelligent baby! So, I'm going to pick a football player because they all lack intelligence!" just pissed me off. Judgmental much? She's such an idiot. 
On the other side, Cal. I really didn't like him either. "...why should he chose a desperate 30 year old..." Yeah, he is 36. Anyone over 24 is "too old." FUCK YOU ASSHOLE!! I thought he was mean, spiteful, ageist. Granted, he had every right to be pissed, but he took it too far.
I could not forgive (or forget) anything that they did.  Much less like them or even want these 2 toxic people to be together.  What she did was mortally and ethically wrong. 
The best parts of this book were Lynn, Annie, and Jim.
This just hit a lot of my hates. It definitely feels like I didn't read the same book that so many others read (and loved).
 
 

 

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text 2018-08-14 10:35
Buddy Read with Themis-Athena of The Solitary Summer: Date Line to the rescue!
The Solitary Summer - Elizabeth von Arnim

Themis-Athena and I agreed to a Monday start date, but my last read took longer than expected, and I was feeling like a slacker for starting this today, until I realised it was still Monday in Germany when I started it.  Score!

 

Not too far in, but the writing is much like it was in Elizabeth and her German Garden, so I'm enjoying it so far.

 

 

"...how can you make a person happy against his will?"

 

how indeed?  I love her no-nonsense approach to life.

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review 2018-08-12 00:46
A Watershed Moment
A Daring Venture - Elizabeth Camden

Poised on the brink of a watershed moment for delivering clean water to the masses, “A Daring Venture” adroitly combines science with the human element. Hindsight is usually 20/20, and it is easy to look back and forget that what we now take for granted was once contentious and groundbreaking. As such, it is informative to see both sides of the controversy and to get a glimpse into the techniques, sacrifices, and struggles of each. Elizabeth Camden achieves this without overwhelming the reader with scientific detail, composing a novel that keeps readers engaged and intrigued.

My grandmother was born in 1908, and I know little about her life or the early twentieth century in America, so it was a treat to read a story set during that time period. Another aspect of this novel that distinguished it from other historical fiction was the occupation and background of the main character, Rosalind Werner. Her childhood brush with cholera paves the way for her professional aspirations and also makes her more sympathetic to readers, and having achieved her doctorate in biochemistry from a German university makes her completely unique in this genre. Nicholas Drake is similarly distinctive, a suitable complement and adversary. The moral and ethical considerations woven into the narrative cause Rosalind and Nick’s professional and personal lives to intersect while infusing the story with a subtle faith element. Elizabeth Camden truly pens a tour de force with “A Daring Venture”, and I would highly recommend it to anyone looking for an intelligent, absorbing read.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Bethany House Publishers and was not required to post a positive review. All opinions expressed are my own.

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text 2018-08-11 21:48
Reading progress update: I've read just a few out of 224 pages.
Elizabeth and Her German Garden (The Penguin English Library) - Elizabeth von Arnim

Thanks to all of you who turned me on to Elizabeth. Love this book. Did anyone read any follow ups?

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review 2018-08-09 00:40
The Adventures of Elizabeth in Ruegen
The Adventures of Elizabeth in Ruegen - Elizabeth von Arnim

I can't believe how long it took me to read this book.  It was my second Elizabeth von Arnim book, after reading Elizabeth and Her German Garden, and i have to say it was harder going at first.  Her Adventures in Rügen start off in a much more florid style of writing than she used in German Garden; her verbosity was challenging, to say the least, and I found myself putting the book down and passing it by for days on end.  I was determined though, because I had to believe the writing I loved in German Garden would be in there somewhere.

 

And it was.  By the fourth day (page 87), the Elizabeth I had expected started showing up. Coincidentally it was about this time that her idyllic trip round Rügen started to become less idyllic and more comic.  By the fifth day (page 115) I was pretty well hooked, and where as the first 115 pages took me three weeks to read, the remaining 185 took just a few days.  As the book, and her trip,  progress, the writing becomes more concise and the pace ratchets up higher and higher until it reaches its final, devious, and hilarious conclusion.  I loved the last two chapters, they had me chuckling regularly, and the ending was absolutely perfect.  

 

A few notes about my copy of this book: I was lucky to find a 1904 copy in beautiful condition that includes a pristine pull out map of Elizabeth's trip.  A few things about it made me smile though: the cover title spells the island's name as Ruegen, but everything else in the book uses Rügen.  Both are correct (as ue is the alternate for ü), but the inconsistency left me curious about why.  Also, my edition's copyright is in the USA, but it states that it is strictly intended for circulation in "India and the British Colonies" only, and the publisher is Macmillan, London.  So we have a book written in Germany, printed by a London publisher, copyrighted in the USA, for circulation in India and the colonies.

 

This is why I love old books.  

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