logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: every-time
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-04-20 17:39
Review ~ Great read!
Dangerous Talents - Frankie Robertson

Book source ~ ARC. My review is voluntary and honest.

 

Emergency dispatcher Celia Montrose is out on a hike looking for some lost petroglyphs, but when she finds them her life changes in a way she never would have believed. Transported to another world with no idea how or why, Cele is just trying to survive in a desert with no water. When a group of strange men come across her, she’s afraid, but her need for water is now desperate. She trusts them, but is watchful. The leader of the group, Lord Dahleven, is just as wary of her. Is she a spy, ally, or something else? He thinks she may be Fey-marked, but he needs to hoof it back home to warn his people of impending war, so he drags her along for the ride until he can figure her out. And that’s when things go sideways.

 

I don’t read too many time travel stories anymore, but this is more like world or dimension travel even if the people of Alfheim are living like times long past. The writing is good, the characters interesting, the world is fascinating, and the plot is decent. My main problem is with Celia. Her singlemindedness to get home blinded her to everything else around her. And this makes her act like a damn moron. Plus, I had a hard time with the insta-love between her and Dahleven. But other than that this is a tale that will keep you turning the pages.

Source: imavoraciousreader.blogspot.com/2019/04/dangerous-talents.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-04-19 04:41
A Sweet Novel (with some pretty big problems)
KA-E-RO-U Time to Go Home - B. Jeanne Shibahara

Every so often I get a book that I struggle writing about. I know what I want to say about it, but I'm worried that my point will get lost. So, stymied, the file sits blank on my screen for a couple of days while I hem and haw. I've been doing that for most of the week about this book (and afraid it was going to happen last week). Hear me out.

 

There are so many things that I'd typically complain about in a book -- casual disregard for grammar, sentence structure, mechanics; characters that behave like characters in a book, not people; a plot that makes sense to no one (well, part of it, anyway). Really, this is not a good novel.

 

But . . . dang it, there's something about this book that I liked. It's like a long, meandering Sunday drive -- or walk in the woods -- you take a windy road/path to nowhere in particular -- occasionally stopping at a scenic overlook or wandering from the route for a bit before resuming. You don't get anywhere fast, you may hit a bumpy/rocky patch, but overall you count it as a pleasant afternoon.

 

So Meryl's a Vietnam widow (it's pretty unclear when this happens -- other than her son is an adult now) comes into possession of a flag that belonged to a fallen Japanese soldier from the War in the Pacific. She's pushed to go to Japan (where her son teaches English) to return the flag to the soldier's family. She ends up going on the trip and finds the freedom and ability to move on from her husband's death.

 

The love story is ludicrous. Actually, there are a couple of them (three) -- and they're all ridiculous, and old Disney cartoons do a better job depicting love. They're not the actual heart of the book -- but man, they get all the attention. The heart of the novel is this simple story of the return of this flag to what's left of the family of this soldier.

 

When the novel focuses on that story? It's a real winner. I can believe those people, I can believe those reactions. I can believe it-- and I want to read it (not just put up with it). In addition to this, the looks at Japanese culture are great -- on the whole, this novel doesn't focus on the parts of Japanese culture usually featured in books/films.

 

We spend way too much time with characters -- pages and pages -- just for them to appear for a paragraph or three in the story. As interesting as these journeys into backstory may be, by the time we get back to the story for them to disappear just drives me crazy.

 

To put it in the kindest way I can: this is a very idiosyncratic with a charm that is its best feature. It's sweet. The historical and cultural insights are great (and almost worth the effort alone). If you give this book a chance -- and a lot of leeway -- it'll win you over.

 

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this novel from the author in exchange for my honest opinion, I think it's clear that my opinion wasn't that swayed by it.

Source: irresponsiblereader.com/2019/04/18/ka-e-ro-u-time-to-go-home-by-b-jeanne-shibahara-a-sweet-novel-with-some-pretty-big-problems
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2019-04-18 14:22
REVIEW BY DEBBIE - Honey From the Lion (Love Across Time #2) by Jackie North
Honey From the Lion (Love Across Time #2) - Jackie North

Soulmates across time. A love that was meant to be.

In present day, Laurie, tired of corporate life, takes a much-needed vacation at Farthingdale Dude Ranch.

The very first night a freak blizzard combined with a powerful meteor shower takes Laurie back to the year 1891. When he wakes up in a snowbank, his only refuge is an isolated cabin inhabited by the gruff, grouchy John Henton, who only wants to be left alone. His sense of duty prevails, however, and he takes Laurie under his care, teaching him how to survive on the wild frontier. 

As winter approaches, Laurie's normal fun-loving manner make it difficult for him to connect with John, but in spite of John's old-fashioned ways, the chemistry between them grows. 

Sparks fly as the blizzard rages outside the cabin. Can two men from different worlds and different times find happiness together? 

A male/male time travel romance, complete with hurt/comfort, true confessions, a shared bed, fireplace kisses, the angst of separation, and true love across time. 

 

@debbiereadsbook, @JackieNorthMM, #Historical, #Contemporary, #MM, #Romance, #TimeTravel, 4 out of 5 (very good)

Source: archaeolibrarian.wixsite.com/website/single-post/2019/04/18/Honey-From-the-Lion-Love-Across-Time-2-by-Jackie-North
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-04-18 04:36
The Time Collector
The Time Collector - Gwendolyn Womack

Roan West has a unique talent, he is a pyschometrist- a person who can read the imprinted memories on an object or person just by using his sense of touch.  There are only a handful of  pyschometrists in the world and since a recent discovery of strange artifacts dubbed ooparts, psychometrists have been gone missing, including Roan's friend, Stuart.  Ooparts, or Out of Place Objects are artifacts that originated in one time period, but are unearthed in rock from a previous time period.  The ooparts carry a mystery to be unlocked, and someone believes that the pyschometrists are the key.  When Roan hears of a new pyschometrist in LA, Melicent, he rushes out to meet her and warn her that she is now a target.  When Roan and Melicent meet, sparks fly and Melicent finds herself in immediate danger.  Now, Roan is racing the clock to find out the secret of the ooparts and to keep Melicent and the other pyschometrists safe.  

 
Exciting and distinctive, The Time Collector creates an amazing world with people who are able to read the past off of an object.  If I could have any superpower, I would definitely choose this one.  Because of Roan's ability, he has been able to live the lives of countless people throughout history.   Roan has experienced violence, trauma, love, happiness, greed, fame and many other emotions through the objects he has touched making him a extremely complex, sympathetic and well rounded individual who decided to carefully watch how he used his powers.  Melicent was a complimentary counterpart to Roan.  While their relationship progressed quickly, it was aided by their abilities to read each other.  I loved taking the trips into history and experiencing the emotions and journeys connected to each object.  Through the objects I was reminded of the importance of artifacts as well as our inner ties to objects that we posses. With a surprising and action packed ending, The Time Collector is an exhilarating genre-bending thriller.
 
This book was received for free in return for an honest review. 
 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2019-04-17 00:29
Part Time Cowboy
Part Time Cowboy - Maisey Yates

Sadie's teenage-self was a bit of a wild child. She got arrested (not charged) at 17. She left her small town as soon as she could. Now an adult, she's moved around. A lot. She's decided she needs to put down roots and stay in one spot. Back to her small town she goes, signing a 5 yr lease and planning on opening a B&B. 
Eli's family happens to own both the B&B and land. Eli is a full time deputy (running for sheriff) and part time rancher. He also happens to be the one who arrested wild child Sadie at 17.
I did not like Eli. I thought he threw Sadie's arrest in her face one too many times. Judgmental asshole. I also thought he was controlling and unwilling to change. Sadie was a little better, but I thought she was a little too "all over the place." Maybe flighty is a better word.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?