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Search tags: female-pov
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review 2018-01-16 07:35
How to Speak Chicken
How to Speak Chicken: Why Your Chickens Do What They Do & Say What They Say - Melissa Caughey

This arrived today and I couldn't wait; I've been curious to read it since I first read about it pre-publication.

 

Sadly, it was not quite what I expected. 

 

Almost though.  The author does discuss what chickens are trying to communicate, and she covers a fair amount of anatomical/behavioural information about chooks (Aussie slang), but she's coming from an enthusiast's perspective, not a scientist's.  This is totally ok, but I was hoping for something a tad more in-depth and research based; this is more a 'chickens are wonderful and grossly underestimated' tome.  (She's right - they're hilarious individualists, and anyone who keeps one for more than 10 minutes will never underestimate them again.)

 

In spite of it not measuring up to my expectations, it's a lovely book overall and I did learn quite a bit more about chickens.  Turns out, I have 3 of the closest living relatives to T. Rex living in my back garden.  How cool is that?

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review 2018-01-15 06:59
Buried in Books: A Reader's Anthology
Buried in Books: A Reader's Anthology - Julie Rugg

This one's been on the piles for at least a year now, and upon cracking it open today, I discovered it's an entire book full of quotes about books:  reading, collecting, borrowing, defacing and, in the last chapter, the horrifying prospect of running out of them.

 

I read most of the quotes in the first half, but skimmed the rest, looking for citations that included names or book titles I recognised.  Rugg gets bonus points for a collection that is not a retread of all the popular internet memes; there were very few quotes here that I recognised, and sadly for my TBR, a few titles that the stacks will soon be forced to take in and provide shelter for.

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review 2018-01-15 04:07
Great Beginnings
Great Beginnings: Opening Lines of Great Novels - Georgianne Ensign

A compendium of opening paragraphs from great literature, I see this as a great reference for future trivia games, and Jeopardy re-runs, but any authors/aspiring writers might view it as an interesting exploration of styles.

 

Ensign breaks the sections up by categorising the opening paragraphs: "Once Upon a Time" are literary openers that use First Person, or the Witness as a storyteller; "Setting the Setting" includes those opening paragraphs that immediately set the scene, the time, or use the weather to get the reader immediately involved.  My favorite was the chapter called "Brevity Doesn't Count" - listing opening sentences that are 100+ words long and themselves their own paragraphs.    Not because I like long, drawn out sentences that last forever, but because I can't help but laugh - usually about midway through - and think Breathe!.

 

Each section is very briefly introduced by the author with quick but insightful comments about the effective use of each device.  Moderately interesting in itself, but possibly better thought of as a reference.

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review 2018-01-14 22:07
The Bunny and the Billionaire by Louisa Masters
The Bunny and the Billionaire (Dreamspun Desires Book 43) - Louisa Masters

Surprisingly engaging read, considering that there is absolutely no angst and boys do nothing but hang around, drink and eat in fancy-schmancy places :)

 

Dani, whose annoying "via iPhone" presence, ruined it a little for me. 4.5 stars instead of 5.

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review 2018-01-14 07:30
Sons of the Wolf
Sons of the Wolf - Barbara Michaels

Pure gothic suspense.

 

Two young heiresses sent to live in a mansion out on the moors of Yorkshire, completely removed from any society, with a mysterious guardian they've never met:  check.

Old abandoned half-ruined monastery:  check.

2 misunderstood sons, one dark and brooding, one sensitive and artistic:  check

Rampant superstition about mythical creatures:  check

One supposedly untameable black stallion: check

Big hounds roaming the moors:  check

Gypsies:  check

 

Sons of the Wolf has it all in spades.  Unfortunately, I didn't really connect with any of the characters enough to make the fantastically insane and relatively dark plot work.  I didn't hate it, but I wasn't at all invested in it, making a lot of small things I probably wouldn't notice if I were neck deep in the story stand out and irk me.

 

I didn't hate it; if someone were in the mood for a gothic story, it might provide a fun afternoon.  But it wasn't one of Michaels best.

 

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