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review 2016-10-30 07:16
Inheritor by C.J. Cherryh
Inheritor - C.J. Cherryh

I waited too long to review this, and now my memories are a bit fuzzy, but I'll do the best I can.

In Inheritor, Bren is once again trying to make do with incomplete information. The book takes place 6 months after the previous one. Bren has been separated from Jase for a bit, and that separation makes their already strained relationship worse. Jase doesn't seem to be handling the culture shock of living among the atevi, living on a planet, and speaking mostly Ragi very well. Bren has his own frustrations and worries – after the events of the previous book, he doesn't dare go back to Mospheira for fear that he'll be arrested or otherwise prevented from leaving. Mospheira's conservative element has become more powerful, and the rift between Bren and his family (and all other humans) continues to grow.

I know that a lot more happened but, again, it's been a while and I'm fuzzy on the details. What it comes down to is that, although I didn't dislike this book, I didn't love it either. This was a bit disappointing, since I'd enjoyed the previous book so much.

I enjoyed getting to see Banichi, Jago, and Ilisidi again, and there were several nice moments that made me smile or laugh. I liked the glimpses of Jase's difficulties adjusting to his new position – not just the work involved in trying to learn a new language, culture, and social expectations, but also adjusting to living on a planet rather than on a station.

That said, I was frustrated with several things. One of them was kind of my fault: I started reading this book too soon after finishing the previous one. I thought it'd be like Invader and start right where the previous book left off. Instead it was 6 months later, and readers were treated to lots and lots of recapping that I didn't particularly want or need.

I was also frustrated with Bren, who expected more from Jase than I thought was fair. In Bren's mind, Jase wasn't just the ship paidhi-in-training, he was also a potential friend (yes, Bren's quest for friendship continues). However, Jase wasn't as open and friendly in person as he'd been in their communications in the previous book, and Bren was disappointed. That disappointment kind of irked me, because Jase didn't owe him friendship. I know, I know, emotions just are, but it was like in Foreigner, when Bren was desperately trying to explain to Banichi how he felt about him and the conversation kept going wrong. This wasn't just one conversation, however, but rather several hundred pages of Bren trying and failing to connect with Jase.

A revelation late in the book added an element to the story that would probably make this a better reread than first read, at least for me, so I'm looking forward to eventually listening to the audiobook version I bought. That one bit of information put a new spin on so many moments and scenes. I loved that, but I also disliked that it took so long for that information to be given. It made the book feel like a very long setup for the next story arc, rather than something meant to be enjoyed on its own.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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review 2016-08-01 03:51
Invader by C.J. Cherryh
Invader - C.J. Cherryh

Invader picks up pretty much where Foreigner left off. Bren is barely out of surgery before he's called back to work. The starship Phoenix, the one that originally brought humans to the planet, has reappeared, and everyone is concerned. What do the ship folk want? Does Mospheira plan to deal with them and, if so, where does that leave the Treaty with the atevi?

Bren, still in a bit of pain (and, at the very beginning, foggy due to pain killers), finds himself in an extremely difficult position. Deana Hanks, his eventual successor, took over his job after Tabini stashed him away during the events of the previous book, and now she refuses to leave even though it puts her in violation of the Treaty. Hanks and her backers in the State Department believe that Bren has gone native and is no longer looking out for Mospheira's best interests. Hanks would oust Bren and become the new paidhi, except Tabini absolutely refuses to talk to her and would in fact have had her killed already if Bren hadn't specifically asked him not to. Although Bren is now getting much more information from Tabini and his bodyguards than he was in the first book, people are still keeping things from him, and he's almost completely blocked from communicating with the Foreign Office back in Mospheira.

Although he knows that he might be labeled a traitor, Bren offers to act as translator between the ship folk and the atevi. He has to convince the atevi that Mospheira won't automatically betray them in favor of the ship folk, clean up Hanks' political and linguistic messes, and figure out a solution to the ship problem that has the highest chance of being mutually beneficial to Mospheira and the atevi, all while simultaneously dealing with personal crises, terrifying gaps in his knowledge, and assassination attempts.

I read Foreigner a couple months ago and thought it was good, but frustrating. I absolutely loved Invader. The overall story seemed smoother, and Bren finally had the opportunity to show that he was extremely good at his job.

In the first book, Bren was an emotional mess stuck in a situation where his skills as paidhi were less immediately important than his bodyguards' ability to keep him safe. He received little-to-no useful information from anyone and basically had to operate blind. Since he was the POV character, readers had to operate blind too. It was uncomfortable, and I was so relieved to find that things were better in this book. Yes, Tabini's people censored what information they gave him, but they didn't keep him completely in the dark the way they did in the first book. His ability to communicate with Mospheira was hobbled, but he at least got enough information to speculate about what was going on.

I love characters who are really good at their jobs. In this book, Bren got to shine. I loved reading about him figuring out how to explain human thought processes in ways he figured the atevi would understand. I loved seeing the logic behind the arguments he used. I really loved Bren's first real-time translation between the ship folk and the atevi, and the mental and emotional shifts he had to go through in order to do that. Invader provided a bit more detail about how Ragi, the dominant atevi language worked –  a combination of the usual vocabulary and grammar, plus a crap ton of mental math. Speaking of which, I was surprised that Bren didn't tell the ship folk that whichever person they assigned to learn Ragi should ideally be excellent at math.

Bren was at least as much of an emotional mess in this book as he was in the first one, but I enjoyed it more here – again, seeing him be good at his job helped a lot. The stuff with Barb was only a matter of time, anyway, and it was a relief to get it over and done with. Bren's emotional meltdowns were understandable considering the amount of stress he was under (and the amount of pain he was often in, plus his lack of sleep), and he very carefully made sure that those meltdowns only showed in front of the atevi he trusted most. And his "meltdowns" weren't actually all that bad compared to some of the things Hanks did. Refusing to pick up when Bren called her? Insisting on speaking Mosphei' so that she could snarl at Bren in front of an atevi audience? No wonder Tabini wanted to kill her.

Bren's desire to trust certain atevi led to additional problems, as he found himself fighting his instinct to assign human motivations to atevi behavior. He got along well with Tabini, Banichi, Jago, Tano and others, but him liking them and them seeming, from a human perspective, to like him didn't mean that they wouldn't one day do something that would seem to him like betrayal. He grappled with the possibility that Tabini and Ilisidi were using his human-ness against him, acting in ways they knew would cause him to drop his guard and trust them with more than he possibly should.

And then there was the stuff with Jago. That would be ethically and professionally problematic if he were a diplomat among humans, and certainly the people back in Mospheira wouldn't react well. Among atevi, he had no clue how any of it would be interpreted. I'm torn. On the one hand, I'm all “No, Bren, no!” On the other hand, I'm looking forward to the possibility of getting a better peek into atevi emotional lives. I want more than Bren's staff's reaction to him giving them gifts, Bren's unintentional popularity with atevi women, and even Tabini and Damiri's fascinating domestic squabble.

I suppose you could say this book was slow, but Bren's internal worrying, panic, and mental gymnastics made the pacing feel much faster than it was. At any rate, I enjoyed the story, the characters, the politics, the linguistic and cultural details, and the relationships, even when I had trouble following all the details. I'm glad I already have the second book, and I suspect I should put in an order for the next story arc soon.

Extras:

  • Pronunciation guide (I'm resigned to forever mentally pronouncing Jago's name incorrectly - my brain seems to be unwilling to follow what the guide says is correct)
  • Declension of a sample noun
  • Glossary

 

(Original review, including read-alikes, posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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review 2014-05-12 17:16
bysinginglight.wordpress.com/2014/05/12/recent-reading-fantasy-and-science-fiction
Destroyer - C.J. Cherryh

Reading the cover copy for this one stressed me out–no joke! And the next one looks EVEN WORSE. As a reading experience, this one was a bit frustrating, because we were so close to getting some closure with the whole Barb thing–so close to seeing her as a real person, as opposed to Bren’s biased view of her. But it didn’t quite happen. Maybe it will? I am more hopeful than I was, anyway. And the political stuff and new understanding of the atevi world view is all really fascinating and well-done. I wonder, just as a question of process, if Cherryh understands more about the atevi than she lets on, or whether she writes herself into it.

Source: bysinginglight.wordpress.com/2014/05/12/recent-reading-fantasy-and-science-fiction
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review 2013-04-01 17:45
Inheritor
Inheritor - C.J. Cherryh

A nice wrap-up to the first trilogy in the Foreigner universe. In fact, it would be completely satisfying, if it weren’t for the fact that I know this all goes on for twelve more books or something. My poor Bren! But now, of course, I am invested and I have to find out what happens.

Source: bysinginglight.wordpress.com/2013/04/01/march-2013-reading-list/#Inheritor
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review 2006-07-01 00:00
Foreigner - C.J. Cherryh I only kept going through the first third of the book because I like the author. Very tough slogging through alien psychology but in the end, was quite good.
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