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review 2016-12-07 22:51
Essential Reading Prior to Inking
The Scottish Gaelic Tattoo Handbook: Authentic Words and Phrases in the Celtic Language of Scotland - Emily McEwan

Why did I read it?  I'm learning (Scottish) Gaelic, and I've seen so many queries for Gaelic translations for tattoos to which the responses were read this book.

What's it about?  Basically, it is a short history of the Gaelic language, and how to go obtain a good translation before having it permanently inked on your body.  

What did I like?  The short history lesson was sound.   What I truly liked were the examples of translation requests illustrating how differently an English phrase can be interpreted in Gaelic, i.e. why there are so many differing answers to a request.   It gave an insight into why there is no such thing as a 'straight' translation from English to Gaelic (or any language for that matter), which served as a warning against asking for 'free' translations from random folk on Facebook, Tumbler, etc., etc.  I also enjoyed seeing the mistakes people have made with their tattoos, how these might have occurred, and how to avoid them in future.

I was in absolute agreement with the author's suggestion to her readers that they should interact with Gaelic language as part of a living, breathing culture, rather than just embedding a small piece of it in their skin.  That to truly honour the Gaelic language, or any speaker of it would be to truly get to know the language, and the people who have it.

What didn't I like?  I would have preferred a few more examples of mistakes, but I do see photos regularly appear on the internet, and I have a good laugh.  Besides, if there were too many examples, along with the grammatical reasons the phrases are erroneous, it might have put off those readers solely interested in their own translated tattoo.

Would I recommend it?   Yes.  I can also see now whey so many people are just referring to this book in response to any request made for Gaelic translation of an English phrase to be tattooed

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text 2015-05-14 22:49
Club Leughaidh Cuilean Craicte

An deagh naidheachd: tha sinn a-nis air letheach slighe dhan àireimh de dh'fho-sgrìobhaidhean a cheadaicheas dhuinn cumail oirnn agus sia mìosan eile de leabhraichean-caibideil Gàidhlig dha cloinn 7-12 a chur a-mach. Naidheachd nach eil cho math: gus 100 ball a ruigsinn air 31 Cèitean, feumaidh sinn triùir bhall ùra co-dhiù gach uile latha dhan uair sin.

 

An cuidich thu sinn a chuideachadh cloinn ri leughadh airson tlachd anns a' Ghàidhlig? Bhiodh sinn fada nad chomain nam b' urrainn dhut bruidhinn ri caraidean agus ris an teaghlach mu Chlub Leughaidh Cuilean Craicte, am fiosrachadh a sgaoileadh, agus soighnigeadh cuideachd, mur an do rinn thu mar-thà e!

 

Ma dh'obraicheas sinn còmhla, togaidh sinn coimhearsnachd de luchd-leughaidh Gàidhlig òga - ach feumaidh sinn cuideachadh bhuat an toiseach.

 

Airson barrachd fiosrachaidh agus gus soighnigeadh: Fo-sgrìobh


***

The good news: we’re nearly half way to the number of subscriptions that will let us go ahead and produce another six months of Gaelic chapter books for kids aged 7-12. The not so good news: to get to 100 members by May 31 we need at least three sign-ups per day between now and then.

Can you help us help children to read for pleasure in Gaelic? We’d be really grateful if you could talk to friends and family about Club Leughaidh Cuilean Craicte, share our information, and sign up if you haven’t already!

If we all work together we can build a community of young Gaelic readers – but we need your help.

For more information and to sign up: Subscribe

 

 

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review 2008-07-03 00:00
Scots Gaelic: An Introduction to the Basics - George Robert McLennan If only every language had a book like this you could read before undertaking a course in said language. This is a slim volume, but packed full of useful information, including a brief history of the development of the Gaelic language, pronunciation, why letters are pronounced a certain way, and why it appears this language using more letters than others. Accents are explained as are long and short vowels, the changes for past/present/future tense, prepositions, counting (the old fashioned way) and differences in dialect and a likely explanation as to why they might occur. There is also explanations for words imported from other languages and their spelling and pronunciation. All of which information gives you a head start when trying to read what’s being spoken by your tutor, or sounded from your CD/computer. It all makes much more sense now and I don’t feel so lost wondering where the sound originates. Although this book is only 80 pages long, its a great reference and I will keep it close by whilst I learn Gaelic until I have its contents memorized and can fumble my way through written text, confidently sounding out the words using McLennan’s explanations as a guide.
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