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text 2018-03-20 22:24
Kill Your Darlings - Yellow Team (Round 8)
The Invisible Library - Genevieve Cogman
Artists in Crime - Ngaio Marsh


Who is the Bibliokiller's next victim?


I read The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman and I'm going to use it to play the Victim Card for Meg Murry.  (Author first name begins with G In Meg)



I'm also collecting:

The Dark Tower- Crime Scene card for Artists in Crime by Ngaio Marsh (Series has >8 books)

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review 2018-03-20 21:24
The Invisible Library...
The Invisible Library - Genevieve Cogman

If anyone is familiar with the Bookburners serial then you know that it's remarkably similar to The Invisible Library series. I really like the Bookburners serial so I was excited to come across something else comparable.


I enjoyed The Invisible Library too and really can't believe I waited so long to read it, but one thing I thought could have been better was the world building. It just wasn't as defined as I would have liked it, and I'm referring more so to the Chaos concept, the alternate realities, the Library Language even some of the characters and their abilities were underdeveloped.


I realize it's a pretty complex system but there were a couple of times I wondered if the author even knew where she was trying to go with it.  Maybe those loose ends are tied up in the next book but, I personally like for the foundation to be laid out and nicely detailed, right from the start. It drives me nuts when authors use future installments to fill in gaps and missing pieces.


I am intrigued by the Library though and I really like Kai, Irene and Vale so I'm definitely going to continue the series with hopes that the many underlying layers of the Library develop into something a little more cohesive.

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text 2018-03-07 14:45
I went to the bookstore after work yesterday!
Tricks for Free - Seanan McGuire
The Lost Plot - Genevieve Cogman
Rivers of London Volume 4: Detective Stories - Ben Aaronovitch,Lee Sullivan

This is my haul--I kept it small, because, you know, budgets.  I could happily have snagged a couple of cookbooks too, but I made myself put them back.



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review 2018-03-04 22:30
I'm pulled two ways on this one.
The Lost Plot - Genevieve Cogman

On one hand, it had a fabulous, exciting plot, with lots of twists and adventures and fun. I loved the 1920s New York setting, and how this time it was almost entirely dealing with Dragon politics, with just the odd Fey thrown in to make it exciting. Cogman has a particular genius at setting up those scenes were all the characters she's been picking up along the way collide at just the right moment, and then there's an explosion! I loved watching Irene pinball through the increasingly complicated and dangerous situation, and the section where Kai had to emulate her by running his own side mission was a highlight.


I'm hoping the next mini-arc will be about dragon politics, as I find them more fun than the fey, and I liked a lot of the characters this book introduced.


On the other hand, I feel like someone, preferably her editor, should tell her to lay the heck off on the similes and other related writing tics. I'm sure if I'd been counting, there would have been a simile every other sentence, and that is too many. There was also a little too much description/over explanation of Irene's reasoning on her choices. Part of it felt like not trusting the reader to remember details (and granted she had a lot of stuff in play), and part of it felt like a compulsive need to just list every possible option the author had come up with.


Finally, I started this series with the feeling that the majority of the characters were bisexual, and that the relationship options were relatively open. By this point it seems like the majority of the characters are bisexual, but the only on-page relationships were actually going to see are male-female. Disappointing. I'm just not really feeling another buddy cop m/f romance in my SFF, and romance isn't Cogman's strong point, really.

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review 2018-03-04 20:34
Review: The Burning Page by Genevieve Cogman
The Burning Page - Genevieve Cogman

Reviewed for Wit and Sin


The Invisible Library series has been hit-or-miss for me, and The Burning Page falls into the “miss” category. After enjoying The Masked City as much as I did, I eagerly dove into Irene and Kai’s latest adventure, only to find myself bored for the majority of the book.

The biggest issue I have is that neither the main characters nor the Library itself feel fully developed. I’ve been waiting to learn more about the Library and with the institution under attack by the series’ big bad, Alberich, it felt like the perfect opportunity for insight. Alas, the threat of the destruction of the Library didn’t actually add tension to the story (not once did I actually feel like Irene wouldn’t pull something out of her hat and save the day), nor did it allow readers to go below the surface of the Library’s workings. Alberich throws out some interesting tidbits and there seems to be some internal grumblings among the Librarians, but apparently any new information will have to wait to be explored in future books. As for the characters, both Kai and Vale have grown sort of stale. Kai, who charmed me in previous books, was borderline unlikeable at times and though I allow a lot of leeway considering he’s a dragon (and thus aligned with order), his stubbornness felt like he hadn’t learned anything so far. As for Vale, he still hasn’t risen above a pale imitation of Sherlock Holmes, and when you throw in the painfully awkward forced intimacy between him and Irene, I was just left wanting more. Which brings me to Irene herself. She’s the heart and soul of this series and she falls flat as a character. I don’t need my protagonists to be likeable (she is neither likeable nor unlikeable), but I do want them to be interesting. Irene has unfortunately become a rather generic sort of hero with a possible interesting backstory (presumably to be revealed in future books) who rushes headlong into danger and relies heavily on the Language.

What captured my interest about the first book in the series, The Invisible Library, was the potential in the world. Genevieve Cogman set up a world of infinite possibilities and I was so excited to see what she would do. But the possibilities are largely squandered due to a heavy reliance on the Language, which now seems to be without limits. That’s largely why the stakes feel fairly low in The Burning Page – Irene’s use of the Language seems to fix pretty much everything.

I struggled with rating The Burning Page because it isn’t altogether bad. The beginning and the end are highly entertaining and when Ms. Cogman’s writing is focused she can deliver exciting scenes. But on the whole, The Burning Page felt like it could have been a novella and nothing would have been lost. The story was treading water for most of its length and that just doesn’t make for interesting reading. Even though this ultimately wasn’t the book for me, there’s so much potential in this series that I’ll be giving the next book a shot.

FTC Disclosure: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Source: witandsin.blogspot.com/2018/03/review-burning-page-by-genevieve-cogman.html
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