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review 2018-07-24 17:30
life in Georgian England
Behind Closed Doors: At Home in Georgian England - Amanda Vickery

It's about living in Georgian England and what the household politics would probably have been like.  The life and times of people from a few sources, the accounts books (apparently women did the household accounts and the men did the estate books); diaries; merchant accounts and letters mostly.  It was interesting to see where the roots of the tradition of a parlour in Ireland was, and this was where I had problems with the book.  The period traditions were treated as alien things, not things that have echoed down the ages and some of the commentary about furniture failed to see how and why someone might want to, in a house that is largely their husband's, a space of their own, even if it was only a desk.  And where someone might decide to, when faced with someone who didn't respect their space (which would probably have been often in a world where women were regarded as ornaments rather than people) they would have procured things for themselves that would have been seen by the men as wrong to use, whether that was style or size.  A desk suited to a small woman would have been difficult for a large man to use.  I didn't see the author see subversion in these things, or see the widow buy many tea pots because her husband belittle her "tea habit".  Humankind hasn't changed much, just the decorations.

 

The author also attests that yellow isn't seen in heraldry and therefore isn't caught up in symbolism.  Yellow and gold were inter-changable in heralry (for the most part, it's a little more complicated than that but it is largely thus) and were given a lot of the same attributes and two minutes with a reasonable heraldry book would give you this information, hell two minutes with the Heradry Society website and their introduction to Heraldry PDF (page 10) would tell you what you need to know about yellow/gold (sweet they have rules for same-sex marriage crests...https://www.college-of-arms.gov.uk/resources/same-sex-marriages, their wages are a joke and actually if you examine them are the same as they were in 1831 only translated from £Sd to Decimal, I'd much rather be a herald in Ireland than the UK); yes I know too much about the topic.

 

Honestly this is the only way to really test a book, to test what you know against it and then see where there are flaws and then determine if you trust the rest, I don't know any better.

 

It's not a bad read, a little dry in places but interesting to show how people of a different time lived.

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text 2018-07-17 17:30
Reading progress update: I've read 174 out of 368 pages.
Behind Closed Doors: At Home in Georgian England - Amanda Vickery

Dear writer,

 

Yellow is known in Heraldry, it's what they call gold.  Of course you wouldn't colour a mundane shield in gold, you paint it yellow and your parchment would have gold, as it still does to this day, ditto for silver and white.  

 

Your friendly proto-herald who has apparently read too much on this topic.

 

 

You know what annoys me?  I have a 2:2 in History (this may be partially attributed to extreme exam anxiety, most of my college exams were sat in the college's sick room).  I graduated in 1994, I apparently know a lot more bits of history that are obscure to so many people, I still read history, and I know so many people with "better" degrees than mine who haven't read much in the topic in years and have forgotten most of it.

 

I really have to find a topic and write somethings about them.  I'm tired of yelling at the TV and books that haven't a clue.

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review 2018-05-30 02:56
THE PRINCE (Devil's Duke #4) by Katharine Ashe
The Prince (Devil's Duke) - Katharine Ashe

Generally speaking, I usually pass on books where a woman disguises herself as a man in order to achieve her goals because most of the time they are so fantastically far-fetched that I end up with headaches from rolling my eyes in disbelief so much. Not here, not with Libby. She was such a unique woman to begin with that pretending to be anything but a woman of the ton wasn’t hard to believe. She was both endearing and sensual and her oddities make her a refreshing, different character, setting her apart from other bluestockings. As a matter of fact, Libby is on a whole other level of heroine archetype all by herself. 
Ziyaeddin became captivated by Elizabeth when they first met so when she asked for his help he knew there would be trouble ahead. In spite of their obvious attraction, he tries to keep their relationship as distant as possible, not only because he knows his future is yet to be determined but because he knows of her dreams and doesn’t want to be in the way of them (if that’s not sexy I don’t know what is.) All that sexual tension was just as frustrating for the characters as it was for me as a reader! Yet what I loved the most about his character was that his always cool demeanor was able to reel Libby’s mind back in from the chaos it sometimes was proving once more that a man doesn’t have to be dominant or possessive to be the perfect hero. 

Secondary characters were a true delight. They all added that perfect touch of variety to keep the story moving, and the fact that both Libby and Ziyaeddin had overcome many of their initial fears made the story even more memorable. And that epilogue! I don’t think I’ve ever read one full of so many emotions and feelings. With a heart-melting, enthralling storyline; complex and larger-than-life characters; and the perfect history backdrop this book is for sure an instant re-read. 

 

**I received this book at no cost to me and I volunteered to read it; this is my honest opinion and given without any influence by the author or publisher.**

 

The Prince (Devil's Duke) - Katharine Ashe 

 

Get your copy here: 
Amazon https://amzn.to/2ryyvRM 
B&N http://bit.ly/2vJMgSS
iBooks http://apple.co/2wDmPkF
Indiebound http://bit.ly/2E7r9d4
Kobo http://bit.ly/2wF2tpr
More www.katharineashe.com/The-Prince

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review 2017-08-27 01:14
4 out of 5 stars for Traitor in Her Arms (The Scarlet Chronicles #1) by Shana Galen ~ ARC Review
Traitor in Her Arms: A Scarlet Chronicles Novel (The Scarlet Chronicles) - Shana Galen

Published August 22nd 2017 by Loveswept

Amazon: http://amzn.to/2w7PHkQ

B&N: http://bit.ly/2w7oa2L

iBooks: http://apple.co/2w7XrU2

Kobo: http://bit.ly/2weFJwm

 

 

First book in a new series by the author but just as great as any of her other series.

Widowed Gabrielle has no other choice but to resort to thievery to pay off her late husband’s gambling debts or she will have to face a fate much worse than jail. It’s not what she would have wanted to do with her life but at the time there was not much choice left for her. Lord Ramsey never thought Gabrielle would become the remarkable thief she seems to be, but then again they hadn’t talked to each other since before she got married to no other than to one of his good old friends, and way before he got involved in serious troubles of his own.

 

The love story was fabulous! I was drawn to the couple from page one. The relationship they built felt real and feasible and although there was a clear physical attraction they didn’t jump into each other’s bed at the first chance they got. Gabrielle was smart and cautious and even when she started developing feelings for our hero she didn’t let her emotions rule over her instincts and that to me it’s the best kind of heroine there could possibly exist. Ramsey was charmer with a guilty conscience so although he had a mission of his own and tried to convince himself he only had to care for himself, he always tried to protect Gabrielle as much as he could. He truly was the best kind of rogue.

 

We know it’s a romance story and that you know, HEA, but the way the city of Paris during the Reign of Terror was described- it seriously gave me goosebumps. The gory details and that feeling of fear that felt so palpable and real, and the fact that the author didn’t shrink away from any of it for the sake of romance made this book an even more rewarding and enjoyable read. It was a great read indeed and I definitely will continue reading the series.

 

 

** I received this book from the author at no cost to me and I volunteered to read it; this is my honest opinion and given without any influence by the author or publisher.***

 

 

Traitor in Her Arms

Traitor in Her Arms 
Goodreads

 

 

Now Available!

 

"The intensity of Traitor in Her Arms reaches out and grabs you from the opening page and does not let up until the thrilling climax."
   —Ashlyn Macnamara

 

"If you are looking for a fast-paced adventure combined with a passionate romance, then you will enjoy Traitor in Her Arms."
   —Rakes and Rascals

 

After her late husband leaves her in debt to some dangerous people, Lady Gabrielle McCullough is forced to become a thief. In the intervening years, her skills have not gone unnoticed. After being recruited by the Scarlet Pimpernel, the mysterious do-gooder spiriting aristocrats out of revolutionary France, Gabrielle crosses the Channel for the most daring mission of her life. Accompanying her is the Earl of Sedgwick, a thief in his own right and an enticingly masculine presence. The man is not to be trusted—nor is Gabrielle's body when he's near.

 

Ramsey Barnes would not say he is an honorable man. His whole life has been based on a lie; why change now? Although it pains him to deceive the tantalizing Gabrielle, he's working toward an altogether different objective: unmasking the Scarlet Pimpernel. If Ramsey fails, his blackmailer will ruin him. But when Ramsey's confronted with the carnage of the Reign of Terror, he seeks refuge in Gabrielle's heated embrace. Now he faces a terrible choice: betray the woman who's stolen his heart—or risk losing everything.

 

Read an excerpt

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review 2017-04-02 02:56
Sinclair (Tales of Tooley Street Book 1) - Julia Herdman

As a debut novel, Sinclair boasts the musical language of a practiced craftsman.  The characters are vibrant, each man and woman is lovely, but terribly complex.  Although it is fiction, the struggles of the human heart are illustrated with great care.  James Sinclair is driven by his need for acclaim, only to discover that the love of a good woman suits him fine. Charlotte Leadam is a hard-headed widow, sure she will never love again, only to discover that she has the heart for new romance.  The sinking of the Sherwell, a ship from the East India Company's fleet, sets off a tale about the human capacity to make mistakes, to love the wrong people, and to ultimately find forgiveness in seemingly impossible circumstances.

 

I was enraptured by the multitude of plots that intercepted each other with grace. Much in the same style as the prolific Diana Gabaldon, Herdman made true on her statement to write stories of love while simultaneously introducing characters and story lines one after another.  Written in third person omniscient, the reader is privy to the internal turmoil of all the characters, eliciting, for me at least, a strong affinity with the honorable Frank Greenwood, James Sinclair's loyal companion.  Although the novel is entitled after the dutiful doctor from Tooley Street, Herdman divides her attention among his friends, his relatives, and the neighboring English milieu.  I was surprised that she had not elected to tell the tale in first person, but I was pleased with the final product nonetheless.

 

In conclusion, the story moved at an easy pace, made all the more enjoyable by Julia Herdman's humor and her careful execution of historical fact telling.  I can easily see how further stories may be written to expand on the lives of minor characters like Lucy and the rest of the family at Beverly, Connie and her new role as wife and mother, and William's crush on Alice.  All in all, it's safe to say I'm in need of book two!

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