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review 2019-02-17 18:47
Remember the Alamo!
The Alamo Bride - Kathleen Y'Barbo

Since Kathleen Y’Barbo wrote “The Pirate Bride”, book 2 in The Daughters of the Mayflower series, it is also fitting that she penned “The Alamo Bride”, as there are direct connections between some of the characters. Although I mention this in most of my reviews for this series, it is worth echoing; each book in this series contains a solid plotline that allows it to stand on its own, yet with some mention of previous characters, and the series never feels formulaic. Each contains a romance, but there is a fresh diversity with each new time period and couple. Part of this is no doubt due to having different authors, and the challenge of maintaining the overarching theme of faith and adventure is always met. Readers can start with any book in the series, but for the best experience, I would recommend reading them in order. Doing so also offers a nice chronological timeline of America’s pivotal historical events. Prior to reading this novel, I must admit that I had little knowledge about the Texas Revolution and the Alamo. Nor have I read many books about the Southwest. Thus “The Alamo Bride” was both enlightening and entertaining. The New Orleans Greys were new to me as well, and it was interesting to learn about their involvement in the conflict. Clay Gentry’s role in the novel surprised me, and Ellis Valmont always brought a smile to my face with her feistiness and devotion to her family and the cause. Jean Paul Valmont provided an appealing character because of the difficult decisions he had to make as a patriarch and businessman. The danger of everyday life during this time period was startling, but Y’Barbo does a nice job of presenting the humanity of both the Texian and Mexican sides. As a crucial element of the plot, the head injury was a fascinating and unique touch, adding an extra layer of intrigue. This novel delivers faith, conflict, humor, and love while exploring an often-overlooked piece of our nation’s history. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.

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review 2019-02-14 21:56
Asenath: Vision of Egypt by Sara Hickman
Asenath: Vision of Egypt - Sarah Hickman

This was an enjoyable, speculative story about Asenath, who is barely mentioned in the Bible. She was Joseph's wife. This is the Joseph whose brothers sold him into slavery, but he rose to become vizier, or the second highest after the pharaoh, in Egypt.


Great characters, believable story, and I enjoyed reading it. It is a Christian fiction book, as it tells of her conversion from worshipping her Egyptian gods, to converting and following the One God.

 

4 stars and recommended for Christian and historical fiction fans.

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review 2019-02-13 21:50
From Elk to Mermaids!
Camp Club Girls: Bailey - Linda Carlblom

Linda Carlblom’s “Camp Club Girls: Bailey” 4-in-1 collection includes “Bailey’s Estes Park Excitement”, “Bailey’s Peoria Problem”’, “Bailey and the Sante Fe Secret”, and “Bailey and the Florida Mermaid Park Mystery” with Kate, Alex, Elizabeth, and Sydney each partnering with Bailey, respectively. These mysteries provide just the right amount of danger and suspense to keep girls engaged without being frightening and fall between the Boxcar Children and Nancy Drew as far as reading level and intensity are concerned. The Camp Club Girls series has a nice diversity of characters from different racial backgrounds, united by their faith in God and their knack for solving capers. Although each story focuses on an adventure with two of the girls, the rest of the club is always kept up-to-date on the mystery and offers support through research and prayer. Scripture is quoted frequently and woven neatly into each story, and the girls are given a chance to reach out to others and evangelize as they work on each case. However, they do make mistakes, and they have vulnerabilities, which also teaches an important lesson: none of us are perfect.

These stories included several interesting scenarios and settings. From elk stampeding through town to sheep bearing strange messages, from a Native American pottery shop in the desert to Mermaid Park in Florida, there is no shortage of mysteries for Bailey and her friends to solve! They make new friends along the way and help those in need, all while having fun and strengthening their faith. I would highly recommend this series to girls ages 8 and up!

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.

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review 2019-02-08 23:06
Dark, scary, and gripping.
The Nowhere Child - Christian White

Thanks to NetGalley and to Harper Collins for providing me an ARC copy of this book, which I freely chose to review.

I’ve read quite a few books by Australian writers recently (Liane Moriarty, Jane Harper, Liza Perrat), and although very different, I enjoyed all of them and could not resist when I saw this novel, especially as it had won an award Harper’s first novel The Dry also won.

Although part of this novel is set in Australia, it is not the largest or the most important part of it. This novel is set in two time frames and in two places, and the distance in time and space seems abysmal at times. The novel starts with a bang. Kim, the main protagonist, an Australian photographer in her late twenties, receives an unexpected visit and some even more unexpected news. This part of the story, the “now”, is narrated in the first person from Kim’s point of view, and that has the effect of putting the readers in her place and making them wonder what they would do and how they would feel if suddenly their lives were turned on their heads, and they discovered everything they thought they knew about themselves, their families, and their identities, was a lie. She is a quiet woman, and although she gets on well with her stepfather and her half-sister, and she badly misses her mother, who died a little while back, she’s always been quite different to the rest of the members of her family, and enjoys her own company more than socialising. There are also strange dreams that bother her from time to time. So, although she does not want to believe it when the stranger tells her she was abducted from a small town in Kentucky as a little girl, she is not as surprised as she should be. At this point, we seem to be in the presence of a domestic drama, one where family secrets are perhaps a bit darker than we are used to, but the plot seems in keeping with the genre. And most of the “now” section of the book is closer in tone and atmosphere to that genre.

But we have the other part. The “then”, written in the third person, from a variety of characters’ points of view. Readers who dislike head-hopping don’t need to worry, though, because each chapter in the “past” section is told from only one character’s point of view, and it is quite clear who that is, avoiding any possible confusion. The story of the background to the kidnapping, and the investigation that followed, is told from the point of view of members of little Sammy’s family, the sheriff (I really liked him), neighbours of the town, and other characters that at first we might not grasp how they are related to the story, but it all ends up making sense eventually. This part of the novel feels much more gripping and dynamic than the other, and although we don’t always follow the characters for very long, the author manages to create credible and sympathetic (or not so sympathetic) individuals, some that we get to feel for and care, and even when they do some pretty horrible things, most of them feel realistic and understandable. And the story of what happened in the past makes for a pretty dark combination of thriller and mystery, well-paced and gripping.

I don’t want to give too much away, but I must say the town of Manson of the novel is a place that seems right out of a dark fairy tale, and I kept thinking of the opening titles of the TV series True Blood (not because of any supernatural thing, but because of some of the images that appear there). While some of the scenes seem typical of a small town in the middle of nowhere, others reminded me of Southern Gothic novels, and, a word of warning: there is violence, and there are scenes that can be terrifying to some readers (although no, this is not a horror novel, the author is not lying when he says he admires and has learned a lot from Stephen King). The story is full of secrets, red-herrings and confusing information, clues that seem clear but are not, and Kim/Sammy is a woman who keeps her emotions to herself, understandably so considering the circumstances. I am not sure many readers will connect with Kim straight away because of her personality, but I understand the author’s choice. If she was an emotional wreck all the time, it would be impossible for her to do what she does and to learn the truth, and the novel would be unbearable to read, more of a melodrama than a thriller or a dark mystery. The part of the story that deals with the present helps reduce the tension somewhat while keeping the intrigue ticking, and although it feels slow and sedate compared to the other part, it does ramp up as they dig into the past and the two stories advance towards their resolution.

Without going into detail, I can say that I enjoyed the ending, and although I suspected what was coming, I only realised what was likely to happen very late in the story. Despite this being the author’s first novel, his screenwriting experience is evident, and he has a knack for creating unforgettable scenes. This is a novel destined to become a movie, for sure, and I’d be surprised if it doesn’t.

This is not a typical mystery or thriller, and although it has elements of the domestic noir, it is perhaps more extreme and darker than others I have read in that genre. We have a very young child being kidnapped; we have murder, extreme religious beliefs, prejudice, postnatal depression, a dysfunctional family, snakes, secrets, lies, child abuse, and more. If you are looking for an intriguing read, don’t mind different timelines and narrators, and are not put off by difficult subjects and scary scenes, you must read this one.

 

 

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review 2019-02-07 02:58
Borne for Life by Graham Carter
Borne for Life - Graham Carter

In the midst of a murder, organized crime, and a reporter's quest to uncover them, is a beautiful story about mercy, grace, redemption, and the spiritual battle going on all around us. I loved this book! Had me in tears by the end.

This author never disappoints.

 

5 stars and recommended!

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