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review 2020-07-01 16:37
Wytches: Volume 1 by Scott Snyder, Art Jock, Matt Hollingsworth, and Clem Robins
Wytches Volume 1 - Scott Snyder,Jock

Title: Wytches

Series: Wytches #1

Authors: Scott Snyder, Art Jock, Matt Hollingsworth, and Clem Robins

Publish Date: June 24, 2015

Publisher: Image Comics

Format: Paperback

Page Count: 192 pages

Source: Library

Date Read: June 24-26, 2020

 

Review

 

I needed a horror book to fulfill a SRP prompt. I figured reading a graphic novel was the quickest way to get this prompt filled. It took me a while to warm up to the story, but what really influenced my rating was the author's notes/essays at the back of the book. 

 

For the most part, I liked the art but there were times that the art could have cleaner to make the story clearer. Sailor is the teenage daughter of a comic/graphic novelist and a doctor. She was bullied by another teenage mean queen, but something happened to the teen mean queen when the two confronted each other in the woods alone. Then dear old mom is in a car accident and loses feeling/control of her legs. Sailor and the parents move to a new city to get over what happened to teen mean queen and find new employment for the mom. Yet something is hunting them, Sailor in particular. Dad and Sailor work to figure out and put that something away for good. I liked the story and it was creepy but not gory so I could deal with it. It did take me a while to get into the story. The story was confusing at times and I got a bit bored by the some of the flashbacks, but eventually it made some sense in the overall storyline.

 

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review 2020-07-01 14:30
Wonder Woman: Warbringer the Graphic Novel by Leigh Bardugo, Louise Simonson, and Kit Seaton
Wonder Woman: Warbringer the Graphic Novel - Leigh Bardugo,Louise Simonson,George Seaton

Title: Wonder Woman: Warbringer the Graphic Novel

Series: DC Icons #1

Authors: Leigh Bardugo, Louise Simonson, Kit Seaton

Published Date: January 7, 2020

Publisher: DC Comics

Format: Paperback

Page Count: 208 pages

Source: Library

Date Read: June 26, 2020

 

Review

I was gifted the audiobook (CDs) a few years ago, but wasn't interested in listening to this version. I picked up the ebook when it was on sale a while ago, and never felt in the mood to start it. So when I saw this version in my library I decided to go for it and have it fill a prompt on the SRP. I'm so glad I did - it was a great story but also streamlined for my attention span. 

The story opens with Diana preparing for an important race to help her improve her standing with some of her Amazon sisters, especially her mother's right hand woman/#1 general who has an unfounded hate towards Diana because she was created differently than the rest of the island's inhabitants. On her way to winning the race, Diana notices a ship that 1)broke through the barrier separating the island from the World of Man and 2) the ship was on fire and going down quickly. She leaves the race and jumps into the water in the hopes of saving those onboard. There was only one survivor, an older teen named Alia. Alia is the descendent of Helen of Troy and as such, she is a Warbringer. 

Diana and Alia work to find out how to stop the people who are hunting Alia as well as help Alia redeem her ancestors/stop the Warbringer bloodline. There are others on the team: Jason (Alia's brother), Theo (friend of the family), and Nim (Alia's BFF who deserves her own series!). This is a coming of age story nestled in a journey to Greece and the resting place of Helen. On the way there is romance, really great one-liners, and some deep topics brought up (race, sexism, capitalism, etc). 

Overall, it was fun and adventurous story that added to my love of Wonder Woman. 

 

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review 2020-06-29 16:53
Great Read
John Henry: The Steam Age Original Graphic Novel - Dwayne Harris

I picked up the first issue of this limited series because it was free.  And it still is free on Kindle, at the least. 

 

I think I first heard about John Henry because of a cartoon short.  At any rate, before I saw John Henry the horse, I knew who John Henry was and, therefore, knew who the horse was named after (he lived up to the name).

 

Harris' reimagining of the story places Henry in a steampunk universe.  It is long the lines of the Clockwork Century (though it is different.  No zombies for one).  The story does tie into the origin John Henry myth and then moves forward while using the myth/legend.

 

What is particularly enjoyable about this series is the role that Polly, John Henry's wife plays.  Some people may not know that Polly had her own set of stories and songs.  Harris does, apparently, and what Polly does is great.  Her role is great.  I really hope that Harris writes a graphic novel about her, and considering the closing panels of this book, a follow up to this book as well.

 

Harris does address the issues of racism and slavery, not just in terms of John Henry (a Black man) but also in the use of other characters and settings.  He confronts the racism that existed (and still does) against the Chinese population whose labor was used to build the railroads.

 

Highly recommended.

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review 2020-06-28 14:58
Nimona!!!
Nimona - Noelle Stevenson

english review only

rating: 4.5 stars

 

Summary: Nemeses! Dragons! Science! Symbolism! All these and more await in this brilliantly subversive, sharply irreverent epic from Noelle Stevenson. Featuring an exclusive epilogue not seen in the web comic, along with bonus conceptual sketches and revised pages throughout, this gorgeous full-color graphic novel is perfect for the legions of fans of the web comic and is sure to win Noelle many new ones.

Nimona is an impulsive young shapeshifter with a knack for villainy. Lord Ballister Blackheart is a villain with a vendetta. As sidekick and supervillain, Nimona and Lord Blackheart are about to wreak some serious havoc. Their mission: prove to the kingdom that Sir Ambrosius Goldenloin and his buddies at the Institution of Law Enforcement and Heroics aren't the heroes everyone thinks they are.

But as small acts of mischief escalate into a vicious battle, Lord Blackheart realizes that Nimona's powers are as murky and mysterious as her past. And her unpredictable wild side might be more dangerous than he is willing to admit.

 

My review: I really enjoyed this A LOT!!!

 

When I started the book, I was in for a fun adventure of a small sunshine who starts to work with a big not so soft dude, who is totally soft for her. THE JOY I FELT. And I loved them working together, I loved their banter, I loved the relationship they build. I started to have all the "found family" feels.

 

BUT OH BOY. This book went into a completely different direction than I thought it would. And I got so many different feels. THE HEARTBREAK, THE HURT, THE "OH SHIT, WHAT'S HAPPENING, I CAN'T DEAL WITH THIS" feels. It was A LOT.

 

I loved the story, I LOVED the characters. I LOVED THE ARTWORK. Holy shit, this book is freaking STUNNING.

 
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review 2020-06-27 14:30
The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang
The Prince and the Dressmaker - Jen Wang

Title: The Prince and the Dressmaker

Author: Jen Wang

Published Date: February 13, 2018

Publisher: First Second

Format: Print

Page Count: 277 pages

Source: Library

Date Read: June 16, 2020

 

Review

 

What I liked: Frances. She was awesome and accepting of others and opportunities to come her way. She also stands up for herself again and again. For the most part I really enjoyed the storyline; however, I thought this book felt more in line with end of the century France rather than the 1830s - the ideas employed in the storyline didn't read to me as early to mid 1800s but the more bawdier late 1800s Paris. I loved the fashion France comes up with for Lady Crystallia - the lines, the details were just beautiful. I really like how the Prince Seb is just - yeah, this is just a part of my self expression/partly to escape the duties of his position. There was no real label to what he was doing or who he was. 

 

What I didn't liked: the art was a bit too middle-grade for an older YA audience; also some of the art is very gendered - lots of pink. Prince Seb was so determined to keep his secret guarded that he would throw Frances under a bus, after pages and chapters of his budding friendship with the one person who accepted him from the moment the two met. Also, Prince Seb is the son of King Leo - that would be King Leopold, who was a brutal colonizer of parts of Africa (Congo I know for sure). King Leo seems at the end of the book to accept his son's gender fluidity and became a sort-of hero for gender expression. That is some historical revisionism there author. Because of his dad's acceptance, Prince Seb seems more comfortable taking on royal duties in support of his dad's reign at the end of the book. Ew.

 

Meh. I am glad I read this so I can see gender expression separate from sexuality. But the story could've used some work so that it wasn't harmful to other marginalized people.

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