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review 2018-07-15 17:17
We Were Made to Be Courageous
Unafraid: Be you. Be authentic. Find the grit and grace to shine. - Carey Scott

With the current prevalence of social media, there is an overwhelming lack of genuineness in daily life. Filters create images of people as fairies, animals, you name it, and it doesn’t stop at photos. Whether we’re talking about Facebook posts, text messages, chats, emails, or even video conferencing, the personality we project often isn’t our true self. Instead, it’s the mask that we feel the need to put on for that particular person or situation, and we’re so used to donning it that most of the time we’re not even aware of it. Juggling the myriad roles we play, the busyness of life fuels the masquerade. So how do we get off this crazy carousel of lost identity? That’s where Carey Scott’s “Unafraid: Be You. Be Authentic. Find the Grit and Grace to Shine.” comes in.

This uplifting, inspirational nonfiction book is overflowing with wisdom and guidance about how to be real and authentic through embracing our identity as Christians because “when we really sink our teeth into the truth that our identity is fully rooted in our Creator, it will change everything…if you’re afraid to be real in a world that glorifies the fake, scripture will help you find the grit and grace to unabashedly be yourself.” Scott is not afraid to get down and dirty with readers, speaking truth in a very relational tone that feels like sitting down for coffee with a friend. The numerous Bible verses employed throughout are in modern translation, which I found a bit jarring at first but which actually offered a different perspective and deeper insight. Each chapter concludes with two sections: “Finding the Grit”, which presents application questions, and “Finding the Grace”, which consists of a prayer. “Unafraid” is written for women, and no matter your situation or circumstance, I guarantee that this book will speak to your heart.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-04-08 09:13
Montana Grit
Montana Grit: Bear Grass Springs, Book Two - Ramona Flightner

My reviews are honest & they contain spoilers. For more, follow me:


Montana Grit is the book 2 of Ramona Flightner’s newest historical romance series, Bear Grass Springs. Even though I’ve enjoyed the premise, I have mixed feelings about this one. Will try to explain in my review in the following.

I always talk about Banished Saga, Ramona’s debut series, whenever I review her books. I’m a huge fan of that series and glad that there are a few more installments left before we bid adieu to it. Bear Grass Springs, IMO, is quite different from Banished Saga. Yes, it’s still a clean romance and yes, we still get to know about a family and see them find love one after another but you get your traditional HEA, rather than a Saga where it spans years and includes new characters of new generations. Of course, I’m not comparing the two. I like both styles. In fact, I’m a reader of traditional HEA who has come to love the idea of growing with a family and seeing them grow and expand, becoming their friend in the process.

Book 1, Montana Untamed, introduces us to the MacKinnon brothers Caliean, Alistair and Ewan and their younger sister, Socha. They came to America from Scotland to settle down after they were forced from their lands. Cailean and Alistair arrived first. Eventually, Ewan and Socha joined them. Cailean and Alistair are very successful livery owners, the only one in the small but surely budding town of Bear Grass Springs. They’re well-liked and respected among the people and, alongside Ewan, they’re also well sought after bachelors. Ewan’s skills lie with the carpentry. He’s also earning good. Among the brothers, Cailean the eldest is what I’d call a grumpy bear. Very serious and moody. Alistair, the middle brother, seemed like the one with a sound head on his shoulders. Cool and calm as they say. Ewan is the happy go lucky charmer who can be impetuous at times. His gambling habit is one of those things that his brothers do not approve of. Sorcha is still young and brash, she has her own burdens to bear too as you will read, but her brothers love her all the same.

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review 2018-02-09 01:40
La loterĂ­a
Duma Key - Stephen King

Had an interesting time listening to this in audio format. I mean, I was sketching and coloring like demon-possessed by the last third in.

 

Characterization-wise, creepy dolls are creepy (though it's a nice zig-zagging there), cool old ladies are awesome, and the friendship aspects were beautiful.

 

That arm-bursting scene! My God *shudder*

 

And it was sad and tragic as all hell. La lotería indeed. But who wants such balls to align as these

(spoiler show)

 

 

 

 

 

(couple of examples)

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review 2018-01-19 14:34
Words fail me
A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess

Alright, there is a lot going on in this little piece of poison dripping, mind-fuck of a story, and I don't know that I'm up to the task.

 

First of all, because it's the immediate, I call bullshit on that end (I'm talking of the 21th chapter that was cut-out of the USA version; if you've not read it, this paragraph will make little sense). I read the author's introduction and explanation, and I more or less agree that our empathy and sympathy tends to grow as we mature (and we are more or less savages as kids and teens), but having read the book, I don't believe this level of inner cruelty and utter disregard for other people, or the length it was self-indulged and brought out onto the world can be called "a folly of youth" and hand-waived like that. I do not believe that level of monstrosity is something that can be redeemed, worked out, grow bored out of, and the person just go on to be some well adjusted adult.

 

I also do not know what is to be done with such a person to be honest, even if my knee-jerk reaction if I was the victim would be to kill them. Brain-washing into effectively loosing their free will does not seem to be the answer though.

 

Next: There is a very strong undercurrent of the battle of the generations going on here. The way money is treated, those articles in the diary, and the mention of day hour and night ours, and whom the street belongs to, and even, who has the power in the first part vs. the second, and what it consist on.

 

Actually, the three parts are distillate poison on abuse of power: young hooligans for first, then the police and other punishing/correctional institutions for second, politicians in the third. Everyone screws everyone over, and in the end I hated the lot, little Alex, and his little followers, and the police, and the jailers, and the priests, and the doctors, and the politicians, and the social fighters, and even his victims.

 

Shit, I wouldn't recommend this one, even if I found it oddly compelling *shudder*. It is interesting, and effective, but a vicious way to provoke thought, maybe unnecessarily.

 

Done. Onto "I am Pusheen the Cat", ice-cream and a helping of crack fics for the soul.

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