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review 2018-03-09 15:48
Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism
Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minima... Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism - Fumio Sasaki

I thought It was a book that was about a way how to throw away material things.

It's about Minimalism and It emphasizes that Minimalism is not a purpose but just a means.


Since humans are social animals, they can't live if they are not recognized for usefulness in groups.

Also, It's not easy to express a person's worth and usefulness.

Many people want to let people know about their worth by possessing a lot of material things.

It's one of the easiest ways to express ourselves.

And at the moment, they delude themselves into believing that what they are are the same as what they have.


There are many advantages to be gained by possessing something to the minimum.

We don't need a big house to put those things, we can save money by doing that.

Also, we can save time and money by reducing a thing to take care of. having fewer things stirs it up to feel appreciated what we have.


The idea that was blocked by the things will begin to move lively.

We can concentrate what is more important.


This book speaks about the freedom coming from having fewer material things with some examples.

It explains the importance of this moment and how to concentrate.

Don't be obsessed by the past and we shouldn't neglect the present by preparing the future.


What is important is what would we do after reducing it.

After all, Minimalism is that we reduce something in order to do more important. It is one of the many means to be able to grow up ourselves.

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review 2018-03-05 20:28
Goodbye, Vitamin
Goodbye, Vitamin: A Novel - Rachel Khong

This is a SVR 2018 book. A copy was available on Overdrive, and I needed a desk book. 


I kept getting pulled out of the story at the beginning because I kept having to Google things. Can people who are allergic to NSAIDs take aspirin? What is the difference between lo mein and chow mein? 


But once I settled into the story, the book read very quickly. It might have read a little too quickly? At the end I didn't feel like a year had passed. The book also ended quite abruptly. I would have liked a little more resolution. 


ETA: There were times where I was reading, and it was like seeing my family on the page. That doesn't happen too often, and I like when it does.

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review 2018-02-16 20:45
Kissed a Sad Goodbye
Kissed A Sad Goodbye - Deborah Crombie

Author: Deborah Crombie

Series: Kincaid and James #6

Rating: 3 stars


A decent installment. Solid writing.


After the great character development and momentum of the last book, this one was disappointing. Not much happened to move the characters' story forward. I don't know if that's to allow us to catch our breath and adjust to the turn of events of the last book or what.


On a positive note, the mystery was good. I had no clue who the murderer was until the final pages.


I will continue with the series.  The previous book was just too good for me to give up cuz this one was just so-so.

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review 2018-02-10 21:02
Goodbye Perfect by Sara Barnard Was Actually Perfect
Goodbye, Perfect - Sara Barnard

Goodbye, Perfect is the story of what happens to those left behind when an A grade ‘good’ schoolgirl runs off with her music teacher.


I completely adore Sara Barnard’s writing. I asked to be a part of the blog tour because I adored Beautiful Broken Things so much I sobbed into my pillow when I finished it. My copy of Goodbye, Perfect was sitting next to my computer as I was waiting for something to load, and I picked it up just to have a quick flick through, read the first page, and was instantly hooked. I devoured it over the next 24 hours. I haven’t been reading much lately, and I had honestly forgotten the joy that a damn good book can give.


It’s not just that Barnard has a wonderful grasp on how teenagers talk - to each other, to adults, to themselves - but her characters are so three dimensional and I recognise so much of my own life in them. I think that’s why they touch me so much. I could totally identify people from my teen years in the book, and I think Eden’s relationship with her boyfriend Connor was not exactly sweet, but certainly comforting and incredibly real, although Connor does seem particularly mature in response to his on personal circumstances, in comparison to teen boys I knew.


I really liked that the question in the book wasn’t really about Bonnie, the ‘good girl’, and whether or not she really was in love with a man almost twice her age, and whether or not he really was in love with her. The real point of the book was the impact Bonnie’s departure made on those left behind and the position it left Eden in. Eden had a very undeserved bad reputation courtesy of being adopted when she was nine years old, and Bonnie had a good one. Eden was the brash, nonacademic, reckless one and Bonnie was the polite, straight A, measured one. Their friendship cemented on the fact that Bonnie grounded Eden and Eden helped Bonnie loosen up. Bonnie's actions shook her world and Eden was there to witness it.


What really helped me fall even more deeply in love with this book is the layout. There’s not exactly chapters, but it’s divided into the days Bonnie is missing. At the end of these, Eden recaps conversations that took on another meaning after Bonnie left. Text messages and Whatsapp messages are formatted differently. Everything looked so great and I thought it was a really smart and charming way to lay out the contents of the book.

I can’t pinpoint a favourite part of the book because there were just too many, but I’ll mention some things I really loved: Eden’s exploration into what family means when you’re adopted; her relationship with Valerie, her adoptive big sister; the way she looked after both her own and Bonnie’s little sisters; the relationship with Connor; Eden’s mouthiness and how everyone was kind of exasperated with her swearing but she kept doing it; stereotypes of teen girls and reputations and broken homes and perfect lives. In fact, it was Eden who so rightfully pointed out that if Eden’s such a bad girl and if Bonnie’s so good, why was Bonnie the one that ran away, right before final exams?


When I read Beautiful Broken Girls I wondered if it was just going to be it for me, if Barnard was capable of writing another book so perfect and that touches me unlike any other I’ve read before. I did skip over A Quiet Kind of Thunder because I thought it was more about a hetero romance than strong (British) teenage female friendship, which I think Barnard tackles and showcases unlike anyone else. But since Barnard has now managed to hit the ball out of the park twice for me, I am going to read A Quiet Kind of Thunder, and I hope I adore it as much as I have fallen deeply in love with both Beautiful Broken Things and Goodbye, Perfect.


I received this book for free from Pan MacMillan in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

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review 2018-01-16 19:46
Two Women, One Man Who Didn't Know How to Let Go
Too Late to Say Goodbye: A True Story of Murder and Betrayal - Ann Rule

The cases depicted in this book also showed up on Forensic File and Murderous Affairs. Apparently those shows just look for true crime thrillers to show.


This one didn't quite work for me just because I think that Rule had a huge reach about some things (she claimed one woman had to be brainwashed) and her back and forth to two different time periods didn't work all that well. The ending just kind of happens and I felt like there was more missing. 


"Too Late to Say Goodbye" is a true crime book about Jenn Corbin and Dolly Hearn. Jenn Corbin is found dead one morning with a gunshot wound. Initially thought as probable suicide, things about Jenn's marriage come to light which leads to questions about what could her husband, Doctor Bart Corbin (a dentist) have to possibly do with her death. When the manner of Jenn's death is investigated, it comes up that a woman that Bart dated during dentistry school also committed suicide found with a gunshot to her head. When the police start digging, it starts to look like Bart Corbin may have played a role in both women's death.


I thought Rule did a good job showing us Jenn and Dolly in her book. Rule better than anyone I think in true crime books is able to make the person(s) that are lost feel like living/breathing people that you mourn when they are gone.


I just think she missed the mark a bit with Jenn and Dolly. I don't think she meant to, but I thought she pretty much lays things at Dolly's feet with her not being forceful enough to not see Bart anymore after the number of accidents/minor crimes occurred. I just don't get how the police didn't do more when the guy was breaking into her apartment and poured hairspray into her contact lens solution. That right there was assault to me. 


Same problem with Jenn who goes looking for some comfort outside of her marriage via an online game. She at times seems to blame Jenn for getting catfished (that's a term now, not anymore) and says she thinks that the person in question brainwashed her. I wish that Rule had stuck with the story in this one and not had tried to psychoanalyze these women.


The writing was okay, but honestly, parts of the book read as filler. I think Rule wanted to stretch it out because the eventual trials end up being non-starters. 

The ending didn't work for me either since it felt like a lot of things were left unsaid. 



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