logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: home-spa
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-01-17 22:12
I can already tell that I'm going to like this book
Writing Home - Alan Bennett

My copy of Bennett's first collection of diaries and essays arrived today; I opened it to a random page and came across this passage:

 

3 March, Yorkshire. I take a version of a script down to Settle to be photocopied. The man in charge of the machine watches the sheets come through. 'Glancing at this,' he says, 'I see you dabble in playwriting.' While this about sums it up, I find myself resenting him for noticing what goes through his machine at all. Photocopying is a job in which one is required to see and not see, the delicacy demanded not different from that in medicine. It's as if a nurse were to say, 'I see, watching you undress, that your legs are nothing to write home about.'

 

I can already tell that I'm going to like this book.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-16 08:47
good book and characters
Lost Rider (The Coming Home Series) - Harper Sloan

It had been eleven days since the doctor had told Maverick/Mav his career was over. Eleven days of drinking himself into a stupor. Mav had become the thing he had swore he would never be , become the man that raised him. Mav had everything he ever wanted in the palm of his hand. Riding was all Mav had ever needed and now it was gone. Ten years of living his dreams and then it was gone. Bull riding is one of the two things in Mav’s life that bring him peace. Mav still had a fearless streak. For almost ten years Maverick had been the biggest name in professional bull riding. He had always been able to conquer the bulls until Lucifer. Then the doctor said Mav had too many head injuries. One more and he would be taken out of the arena in a body bag. So Maverick was heading home and his older brother Clay was calling again to see when he would get there. Quinn was Mav’s sister. Their father had died and they wanted Mav at the church. Mav had a rough childhood.  But their father hadn’t wanted Maverick around ten years ago. Just being home made Mav feel trapped all over again. There was one thing Mav had wanted more than riding but he had run away from it to chase his dreams  and lived with the regret  since. No matter what he had done or accomplished it still hadn’t made his father proud of Mav. Then Mav thought of Leighton/Leigh. Mav had known Leigh had a crush on him for years. But Leigh didn’t want to leave Pine Oak. Leigh and Quinn were best friends and she sat next to Quinn in church to comfort her. Leigh still loves Mav Leigh was now a baker and owned the Pie Hole.

I enjoyed this book. It was a good hot romance and I loved it.  I liked the plot also. I loved Leigh and Mav together. I felt this was well written. His was a passionate sweet second chance romance story. At times this book dragged for me The chemistry between Leigh and Mav was sizzling. This caught my interest from the beginning and held it until the end. I love how it focused  on the healing of Mav and Leigh. This was a little repetitive at times. I loved the characters and the ins and outs of this book and I recommend.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-15 15:12
The Old-But-Not-Dead Club strikes again. A truly inspiring read, whatever your age.
On the Bright Side: The New Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen, 85 Years Old - Hendrik Groen

Thanks to Net Galley and to Penguin UK-Michael Joseph for providing me an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

A while back I read The Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen, 83 ¼ Years Old (check my review here) and loved it. I was on the lookout for the next one, and when I saw the next one was available for download at NetGalley I did not hesitate. It has now been published and I could not pass the chance to share my review.

Hendrik explains what has happened since his last diary (yes, he is older now) and decides to write his diary for another year, as a way to keep his brain going. He is now 85 and he needed some time to get over some of the sad events of the last book. But the Old-But-Not-Dead Club is still going strong, with new members and plans, including regularly exploring international cuisine (more or less), a short holiday abroad, and an attempt at local (extremely local) politics. Hendrik’s voice is as witty and observant as it was in the first book, although there is perhaps a grittier and darker note (he is feeling low, everything is getting tougher and unfortunately, life gets harder as the year goes along). But not all is doom and gloom and there are very funny moments, as well as some very sad ones. His comments about politics and world events, always seen from an elderly population’s perspective, are sharp and clear-sighted and will give readers pause. Some of them are local and I suspect I was not the only one who did not know who many of the people where or what anecdotes he referred to at times (I must admit that although I know a bit about Dutch painters, I know little about their politics or music, for example), but even if we cannot follow all the references in detail, unfortunately, they are easily translatable to social and political concerns we are likely to recognize, wherever we live. Funding cuts, social problems, concerns about health and social care, crime, terrorism, global warming feature prominently, although sometimes with a very peculiar twist.

The secondary characters are as wonderful and varied as in the previous book. Some of them have moved on (physically, mentally, or both), and we get to know better some of the ones that only briefly appeared in the previous volume. We also have new arrivals at the nursing home, and a more direct involvement in the home’s politics (with anxiety-provoking news present as well. Is the nursing home going to close?). I loved some of the proposed and adopted rules (a complaint-free zone to avoid wallowing in conversations about ailments and illnesses, a high-tea facilitated by the residents, an art exhibition, even if the artist is not the most sympathetic of characters…) and the sayings of the residents. Of course, life at a nursing home comes with its share of loss and although I don’t want to reveal too much, I can say the subject of death is treated in a realistic, respectful, and moving way.

I shed some of the quotes I highlighted, to give you a taster (although I recommend checking a sample and seeing what you think. And, although it is not necessary to read the first book first, I think it works better knowing the characters and their journey so far):

The idea of using care homes to look after the comfort, control and companionship of the elderly is fine in principle. It just fails in the execution. What old age homes actually stand for is infantilizing, dependence, and laziness.

One in four old people who break one or more hips die within the year. That number seems high to me, but it’s in the newspaper, so there is room for doubt.

It’s always astonished me to see the wide support clowns and crooks are able to muster. Watching old newsreels of that loudmouth Mussolini, you’d think now there’s a bloke only his mother could love. But no, millions of Italians loved him.(Yes, I’m sure this can make us all think of a few people).

Difficult new terms that tend to obscure rather than clarify, especially when uttered by policy-makers. It often has to do with hiding something —either a budget cut, or hot air, or both at once.

Managerial skills alone don’t make for better care, it only makes for cheaper one.

And, a great ending (and one we should all take up this year):

A new year —how you get through it is up to you, Groen; life doesn’t come with training wheels. Get this show on the road. As long as there’s life.

The tone of the book is bitter-sweet, and, as mentioned, it feels darker than the previous one, perhaps because Hendrik is even more aware of his limitations and those of his friends, and is increasingly faced with the problem of loneliness, and with thoughts about the future. But, overall, this is a book that makes us think about the zest for life, about living life to the full, and about making the best out of our capabilities. As I said on my previous review, I hope I can meet a Hendrik if I get to that age, and I’ll also make sure to join the Old-But-Not-Dead Club and be an agitator and enjoy life to the end. Don’t ever settle for the easy way out.

A great book for those interested in the subject of growing old, in great characters, and in an out-of-the-ordinary setting. It has plenty of adventures and events (even trips abroad and international cuisine), although it is not a book I’d recommend to people who love fast action and high-octane thrillers. If you enjoy first-person narrations, love older characters, and don’t mind thinking about the long-term (ish) future, I recommend this very inspiring book.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-01-12 07:10
Audio Blitz - Leaning Into Always
 
 

Two titles from two different series by Lane Hayes are now available in audiobook.

 

Leaning Into Always

 
Series: Leaning Into, Book 2
Author: Lane Hayes
Publisher: Self Pub
Original Release Date: September 5th, 2017
Heat Level: 4 - Lots of Sex
Pairing: Male/Male
Length: 30k
Genre: Romance, Bisexual, Established Couple, San Fran, Beach, Surfer, Geek, Opposites Attract, Friends to lovers
 

Add to Goodreads

 

 

Synopsis:

 

Life is good for Eric Schuster. He owns a highly successful tech company, has a great group of buddies, and he’s about to marry the man of his dreams. Eric is pleasantly surprised to find the transition from friends to lovers has been easier than he thought. However, after running into an overly friendly ex-boyfriend on an impromptu trip to their shared hometown, Eric realizes things are about to get complicated.

Zane Richards is a quintessential California surfer dude turned professional sailor. His laid-back approach has helped him navigate difficult times in his life. Eric may not share his easy-going mindset but Zane knows without a doubt Eric is the one. However, carving a future together may require confronting a piece of the past Zane thought he’d left far behind. Both men will have to decide if they’re willing to risk what they know for a chance to lean into always.

 

Listen to a Sample

 

 
 
 
 

A Kind of Home

 

 

Series: A Kind of Stories, Book 4
Author: Lane Hayes
Publisher:  Dreamspinner Press
Original Release Date: June 23, 2017
Heat Level: 4 - Lots of Sex
Pairing: Male/Male
Length: 77k approximately
Genre: Romance, Bisexual, Rock star, NYC, humor, light suspense
 

Add to Goodreads

 

 

Synopsis:

 

Isaac Dalton is the guitarist for Spiral, arguably the biggest rock band in the world. The band’s meteoric rise to superstardom has its perks, but fame and fortune aren’t all they’re cracked up to be. Nonstop touring and performing exhaust him, and when an overzealous fan makes it imperative that Isaac travel with a clingy bodyguard, he is ready for a break from the madness. More so when his newly single first crush shows up on his doorstep. The man is strictly off-limits. He’s a memory from a place Isaac would rather leave behind. And he’s straight.
 
Fun-loving former athlete slash construction worker Adam McBride desperately needs a new beginning. And New York City is the perfect place to start over and think about how to rebuild his life. A short stint as roommates with his brother’s best friend from high school seems like a mutually beneficial arrangement. However, when friendship gives way to fierce attraction, both men find themselves in uncharted and possibly dangerous territory. Isaac has to decide if he’s willing to take the ultimate risk for a kind of love and a kind of home he never dreamed possible.
 

Listen to a Sample

 

 
 
 
 

Meet the Author:

 

Lane Hayes is grateful to finally be doing what she loves best. Writing full-time! It’s no secret Lane loves a good romance novel. An avid reader from an early age, she has always been drawn to well-told love story with beautifully written characters. These days she prefers the leading roles to both be men. Lane discovered the M/M genre a few years ago and was instantly hooked. Her debut novel was a 2013 Rainbow Award finalist and subsequent books have received Honorable Mentions, and won first prize in the 2016 and 2017 Rainbow Awards. She loves red wine, chocolate and travel (in no particular order). Lane lives in Southern California with her amazing husband in a newly empty nest.

 

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads | eMail

 

 

 

Giveaway:

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

  Blog Button 2
 
 
Save Save Save Save Save
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-10 14:13
Yet another overly hyped book.
Home Fire: A Novel - Kamila Shamsie

A modern day retelling of the Antigone story sees Isma return to the United States after caring for her two younger siblings following the death of their mother. But she remains worried about sister Aneeka in London and brother Parvaiz who disappeared to follow the path of their father. The story opens with Isma being detained and missing her flight despite having all the correct paperwork and perfectly legitimate story as to why she's going back to the US. And so begins the story.

 

I don't get it. I had this on my radar but it took the Man Booker prize nomination to jab my memory to add to look it up. I'll admit this gave me pause (other supposedly great Man Booker nominees and winners have been flat for me) but I decided that it was worth trying since it sounded like an intriguing premise.

 

It's awful. The opening with Isma being interrogated by government officials about her history and missing her flight was interesting but from there the book is completely listless. The framing of the siblings (Isma the eldest, Aneeka in London, Parvaiz leaving London to become a jihadi fighter) seemed interesting but in execution it was very flat and just not compelling. The author also divides the book into three different sections for each sibling and I can't stand this device. I can't understand the acclaim and nominations, I'm sorry.

 

Maybe it's me. Maybe retellings are not my thing. But this was excruciating to get through and I have to side with the one and two star reviews on this one. I'd skip it or find a way to borrow it. 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?