logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: horror-tv
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-14 18:16
Review: "Undertow" (Whyborne & Griffin, #8.5) by Jordan L. Hawk
Undertow: A Whyborne & Griffin Universe Story - Jordan L. Hawk

 

~ 4 stars ~

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-12-14 12:45
Char's Horror Corner: Top Ten Audiobooks of 2017!
Blackwater: The Complete Saga - Michael McDowell,Matt Godfrey
The Lesser Dead - Christopher Buehlman
Born to Run - Bruce Springsteen
Between Two Fires - Christopher Buehlman
The Memory of Running - Recorded Books LLC,Ron McLarty,Ron McLarty
Nightmares and Geezenstacks - Matt Godfrey,Valancourt Books,Fredric Brown
You Will Know Me: A Novel - Megan Abbott,Lauren Fortgang
Behind Her Eyes: A Novel - Sarah Pinborough
The Silver Linings Playbook: A Novel - Matthew Quick,Inc. Blackstone Audio, Inc.,Darwin Porter
Empire Falls - Richard Russo

 

This has been the year of the audiobook for me. I believe I've listened to more of them this year than ever before. And boy, this year brought two of my favorite authors to life through the power of voice. Let's get on with it, shall we? (Oh, and click the cover to see my original review!)

 

 Blackwater by Michael McDowell, narrated by Matt Godfrey

1. My number one audio of the year, (and indeed, of ALL time) is Blackwater. Written by the fabulous Michael McDowell and performed by Matt Godfrey, this epic tale spans generations of the Caskey family and their matriarch, who may or may not be altogether human. The star of this show is McDowell's writing-he brings his sharp wit and his knowledge of family dynamics to the table and then Matt Godfrey brings it all home. Blackwater clocks out at just over 30 hours of listening, and I was never, ever bored. 

 

Blackwater: The Complete Saga - Michael McDowell,Matt Godfrey 

 

 The Lesser Dead written and performed by Christopher Buehlman

2. Christopher Buehlman was unknown to me at the beginning of 2017. Now, in December, I count him among my favorite authors. I've read or listened to ALL of his novels since April, starting with Those Across the River and ending with The Lesser Dead. Mr. Buehlman narrates The Lesser Dead himself and in most cases, I don't think that's wise. In this case, he knocked it out of the park. I later learned that he performs at Renaissance Fairs, sometimes as a storyteller and sometimes as a professional insultor. Perhaps his experiences with performing has honed his voicing skills because this book was KILLER. After I finished listening, I "rewound" it, so to speak, and listened to the last chapter again. Oh my goodness, oh so killer!

 

The Lesser Dead - Christopher Buehlman 

 

Born to Run written and narrated by The Boss

3. I'm not a big fan of Bruce Springsteen, but I'm a bigger fan since I listened to his memoir. I have always been a fan of his songwriting abilities and it seems that that skill transferred well to writing this book. I'm sure a true Springsteen fan would get even more out of this book than I did, but I sure did love listening to that husky voice relate how he got started, learned to dance, (to pick up women), and how he struggled to get and keep a band, not to mention a marriage, together.

 

Born to Run - Bruce Springsteen 

 

Between Two Fires by Christopher Buehlman, narrated by Steve West

4. Between Two Fires by Christopher Buehlman, narrated by Steve West was totally and completely INSANE! Some truly scary scenes were depicted in this story and thanks to the vivid writing and expressive voicing, I can still picture them clearly in my head. 

 

Between Two Fires - Christopher Buehlman

 

 The Memory of Running, written and performed by Ron McClarty

5. The Memory of Running, written and narrated by Ron McClarty. I got turned on to Ron McClarty because he narrated Empire Falls by Richard Russo. Then, when I looked for additional performances by him I discovered The Memory of Running. From what I gather, it was originally available only as an audio book which Stephen King highly recommended. Eventually it became available in paper form as well. Anyway, Mr. McClarty used to play a recurring judge on Law & Order, but writing and narrating is most definitely his forte. I loved this weird tale of memories, acceptance and bicycling across the United States.

 

 The Memory of Running - Recorded Books LLC,Ron McLarty,Ron McLarty

 

 Nightmares and Geezenstacks by Fredric Brown, narrated by Matt Godfrey

6. A thoroughly entertaining collection of short stories, some of them super short, but all of them a lot of fun. For the most part, I prefer reading short stories rather than listening to them, but Matt Godfrey's talent made me change my mind about that. 

 

Nightmares and Geezenstacks - Matt Godfrey,Valancourt Books,Fredric Brown

 

 

You Will Know Me by Megan Abbott, narrated by Lauren Fortgang

7. Competitive teenage girls are just about the scariest monsters out there, and I know scary!

 

You Will Know Me: A Novel - Megan Abbott,Lauren Fortgang

 

 

Behind Her Eyes by Sarah Pinborough, narrated by cast

8. The book everyone was talking about at the beginning of the year! Usually, I avoid those like the plague. However, the audio was available at the library, so I decided to give it a go. I vividly remember listening to this while I was cleaning and then, for the last half hour or so, I just sat on the sofa, stunned. 

 

Behind Her Eyes: A Novel - Sarah Pinborough

 

 

The Silver Linings Playbook by Matthew Quick, narrated by Ray Porter

9. Audible was giving this one away for free, so what did I have to lose? I loved the movie, but as usual, the book was a little different. That said, I loved the book too! 

 

The Silver Linings Playbook: A Novel - Matthew Quick,Inc. Blackstone Audio, Inc.,Darwin Porter

 

 

Empire Falls by Richard Russo, performed by Ron McClarty

10. This book came to me highly recommended by a fellow reader. Even though a book about small town life with no evil children or haunted houses is really not my thing, Empire Falls MADE IT my thing. I've since listened to two more audiobooks of Richard Russo's work, (Everybody's Fool and Nobody's Fool), and I tracked down McClarty's Memory of Running, (see above.) Now, I just need to track down the HBO series of this FANTASTIC novel. 

 

Empire Falls - Richard Russo 

 

This year I've learned the following:

 

Ron McClarty and Matt Godfrey can both narrate the hell out of any story, and I will happily listen to them perform their grocery lists.

Authors sometimes CAN perform their own stories and do it better than anyone else.

 

I've finally accepted that audiobooks are an acceptable form of reading and I look forward to finding new narrators and discovering new worlds to listen to in 2018.

 

Thanks for reading if you've stayed this far! I hope you'll join me in enjoying audiobooks in 2018! 

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-13 18:45
The Ghost Club: Newly Found Tales of Victorian Terror by William Meikle
The Ghost Club: Newly Found Tales of Victorian Terror - William Meikle

 

Picture the scene: Victorian London. A smoky club. A group of literary icons. The price to join this group? A story of the supernatural. The scene is now set.

 

Imagine the tales these writers of old would share. Stoker, Dickens, Wells, James, and Stevenson, among others. What price would you pay to sit at that table? Unfortunately, the opportunity to sit there in person is gone, but thanks to William Meikle, you CAN now be privy to these stories and anything else these authors have to say. The entrance fee for you? Quite reasonable!

 

The standout tales for me were:

 

WEE DAVIE MAKES A FRIEND (in the style of) Robert Louis Stevenson. This was the first story and my favorite of the collection. Young Davie is an unwell boy and is often bedridden. The gift of a new toy changes his life.

 

ONCE A JACKASS (in the style of) Mark Twain. A Mississippi steamship captain makes a terrible mistake and unfortunately, all of the passengers and crew pay the price.

 

THE SCRIMSHAW SET (in the style of Henry James) I adored this tale of a haunted (?) chess set. This was my second favorite tale in this collection and I've just read that the author is planning to write more about this set in the future. I can't wait!

 

TO THE MOON AND BEYOND (in the style of Jules Verne) A super cool story about a man, his rocket and a trip to the moon. What was found there and what did he bring back with him? You'll have to read this to find out!

 

BORN OF ETHER (in the style of Helena Blavatsky) A man embarks upon a supernatural journey to freedom.

 

I was not familiar with a few of the authors here, Helena Blavatsky included, but I think the author did a stellar job of emulating their writing styles. These tales were entertaining, well written and I loved the framework within which they were presented.

 

For these reasons, I highly recommend this gem of a collection!

 

You can get your copy here, (your price of admission, rather than a story):

The Ghost Club: Newly Found Tales of Victorian Terror

 

*Thanks to Crystal Lake Publishing and the author for the e-ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review. This is it!*

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-13 17:34
Review: "Fallow" (Whyborne & Griffin, #8) by Jordan L. Hawk
Fallow - Jordan L. Hawk

 

~ 4.5 stars ~

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-13 11:01
Er ging Zigarettenholen
Frankenstein - Mary Shelley

„Frankenstein“ (Untertitel: „The Modern Prometheus“) von Mary Shelley ist meiner Meinung nach Pflichtlektüre, interessiert man sich für Fantastik- und Science-Fiction-Literatur. 1818 anonym erstveröffentlicht, entwickelte es sich zu Shelleys bekanntestem Werk, das die Pop-Kultur wie kein zweites prägte. Die damals 18-jährige Autorin wurde von einem Albtraum inspiriert, der sie 1816 heimsuchte, während sie in Begleitung ihres Ehemannes Percy Bysshe Shelley und ihrer Stiefschwester Claire Clairmont Lord Byron in Genf besuchte. Bis heute ist umstritten, welche Einflüsse Mary Shelleys Traum auslösten, es scheint jedoch sicher, dass der in der Gruppe diskutierte Galvanismus ein entscheidender Faktor war. Für mich spielt es letztendlich keine Rolle, warum Shelley die Geschichte des Wissenschaftlers Victor Frankenstein niederschrieb – ich freue mich einfach, dass ich sie 200 Jahre später lesen kann.

 

Von Kindesbeinen an wird Victor Frankenstein von seinem unstillbaren Verlangen nach Erkenntnissen getrieben. Sein Wissensdurst ist grenzenlos. Er trachtet danach, die Geheimnisse von Leben und Tod zu entschlüsseln. Als Student in Ingolstadt profitiert er von den jüngsten Ergebnissen der modernen Forschung des 19. Jahrhunderts. Erfüllt von fieberhaftem Ehrgeiz gelingt ihm, wozu nur Gott fähig sein sollte: die Belebung toten Fleisches. Berauscht erschafft Frankenstein die unheilige Kopie eines Menschen. Doch seine Schöpfung entpuppt sich als abstoßend, monströs. Angewidert von der Frucht seiner Arbeit wendet sich Frankenstein ab. Die Ablehnung seines pervertierten Kindes wird ihm zum Verhängnis, denn das Monster weigert sich, seine Zurückweisung zu akzeptieren. Verbunden durch gegenseitigen Hass beginnen Schöpfer und Schöpfung einen tödlichen Tanz, der sie bis ans Ende der Welt führt.

 

„Frankenstein“ von Mary Shelley gilt als der erste Science-Fiction-Roman der Geschichte. Es ist immer schwierig, einen Klassiker, der so großen Einfluss auf Literatur und Kultur hatte, zu rezensieren. Oberflächlich scheint „Frankenstein“ lediglich der Unterhaltung zu dienen; erst in der Tiefe offenbaren sich zahlreiche elementare Themen, die sich um die zentrale Schöpfungsgeschichte des namenlosen Monsters herumranken. Dadurch entsteht eine verblüffende Ambiguität, die eine gradlinige Einteilung in Gut und Böse strikt verweigert. Die psychologisch konsequente, realistische Konstruktion der Protagonisten erlaubt der Geschichte, weit über diese engen Dimensionen hinauszuwachsen. „Frankenstein“ enthüllt sich als Tragödie dunkelster Couleur, die unausweichlich fatal enden muss. Ich war in vielerlei Hinsicht von der Lektüre überrascht. Am meisten erstaunte mich, dass ich Victor Frankenstein seinem Monster vorzog. Ich bin vom Gegenteil ausgegangen. Ein Grund ist sicher die Ich-Perspektive des ehrgeizigen Wissenschaftlers, doch diese Erklärung genügt nicht, um meine Schwierigkeiten mit dem Monster zu determinieren. Obwohl ich den Status der Kreatur als einsame, enttäuschte und verlassene Schöpfung anerkenne und objektiv Mitgefühl empfinde, stieß mich ihre aggressiv-explosive Seite ab. Das Monster ist kein rehäugiger, sanfter Galan, es wird von Zorn und Rachsucht beherrscht. Selbstverständlich sind diese Gefühle gerechtfertigt, aber die Verbissenheit, mit der es eine tödliche Fehde mit Frankenstein provoziert, erschien mir kleingeistig, selbstzerstörerisch und seines intellektuellen Potentials nicht würdig. Anstatt die Zurückweisung seines Schöpfers als Chance zu interpretieren und seine miserable Existenz eigenständig zu verbessern, reagiert es jähzornig und gewalttätig, wenn seine plumpen, ungelenken Versuche, Kontakt mit der Gesellschaft aufzunehmen, scheitern und versteift sich auf die widerwärtig egoistische und gewissenlose Idee, Frankenstein schulde ihm eine Gefährtin. Als dieser ablehnt, gewinnt der obsessive Hass des Monsters auf seinen Schöpfer die Oberhand. Aufgrund dieser Negativentwicklung war ich nicht in der Lage, mich dem Monster emotional zu nähern. Das heißt jedoch nicht, dass ich Victor Frankenstein als Opfer betrachte. Von Arroganz geblendet und frei von Demut schwingt er sich eigennützig zum Schöpfer auf, leugnet seine menschliche Fehlbarkeit, die ihm erst der erschreckende Anblick seiner Schöpfung vor Augen führt. Er bereut, dass er keinen Menschen nach seinem Abbild formen konnte. Er bereut nicht, sich überhaupt an der Schöpfung vergangen zu haben. Er ist sich bis zum Ende keiner Schuld bewusst, spricht sich von jeglicher Verantwortung frei und weigert sich, sein Versagen hinsichtlich seiner bizarren Elternrolle einzugestehen. Mit seiner gleichgültigen Grausamkeit verdammt er das Monster und sich selbst unwiderruflich. Die Sünde, seine Schöpfung im Stich zu lassen, ist unverzeihlich. Victor Frankenstein ist ein Vater, der Zigarettenholen ging und nie zurückkehrte.

 

Mary Shelley war ihrer Zeit weit voraus. Nicht nur literarisch, als Begründerin eines komplett neuen Genres, sondern auch gesellschaftsphilosophisch. „Frankenstein“ ist eine anregende Diskussion des Rechts auf Leben, der Position des Individuums in der Gesellschaft und des Grabens zwischen Schöpfer und Schöpfung. Obwohl Mary Shelley keine überragende Autorin war, kaschierte sie ihre Schwächen elegant und wirkungsvoll, indem sie sich hinter ihrer Geschichte völlig zurücknahm und ihren Figuren bescheiden das Rampenlicht überließ. Für mich war die Lektüre interessant und wertvoll, weil sie mir die ursprüngliche Form der Legende des Victor Frankenstein fernab von verfälschten Verfilmungen näherbrachte, die Erzählung, die der historische Beginn der Science-Fiction war. Ich hoffe, dass Mary Shelley im Jenseits beobachten kann, wie viel sie für die (weibliche) Literatur getan hat und sich daran erfreut, dass ihr Roman, der einst einem Albtraum entsprang, 200 Jahre nach seinem Erscheinen noch immer gelesen wird.

Source: wortmagieblog.wordpress.com/2017/12/13/mary-shelley-frankenstein
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?