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Search tags: how-to-love
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review 2017-05-31 16:20
How to Find Love in a Bookshop - Veronica Henry,Julia Barrie,Orion Publishing Group

When her beloved father dies, Emilia Nightingale inherits Nightingale Books, a much loved bookshop, nestled in the Cotswold town of Peasebrook. There she makes new friends, unwittingly helping them with more than book choices. But when a situation arises that threatens the bookshop, can Emilia keep her promise to her dying father, and keep Nightingale Books open?

 

The thing I find about bookshops is how inviting they are. There is the anticipation of finding a new book to fall in love with, of new worlds to explore and often times the shop seems to radiate the comfort and warmth the books themselves can bring. Nightingale Books sounds like the ideal place to lose a few hours, wandering the shops and browsing the shelves, chatting to like-minded book lovers. Lots of people dream of owning their own book shop, I’m one of them, and to my minds eye, Nightingale Books is how I’d picture my bookshop.

 

The story itself is warm and comforting, easy to get wrapped up in. It’s the kind of book to curl up with on a rainy winter evening, or to read whilst lying in the sun. It is filled with a cast of characters that all add layers to the story. Emilia is a lovely character, depicted as kind, considerate and understandably conflicted by her desire to keep the bookshop and the struggle she finds herself in. Julius, Emilia’s father is also a wonderful character, depicted as he is in a few explanatory chapters and through the memory of the other characters. The bookshop itself is a character, and rightly so. It is the linchpin, where the inhabitants of Peasebrook meet, chat and discover new books, and perhaps new people, to fall in love with. There are some characters I would have liked to find out more about as there felt the potential to find out more about them for example Thomasina, the excruciatingly shy chef and Marlowe, the violinist, friend of Julius whose appearances seemed to just scratch the surface of his character.

 

There were parts of the story that could be considered predictable, the trial and tribulation that would lead to the conclusion but I found comfort in those, enjoying the journey the story took me on. The story was told with the right pace, with a variety of different characters to provide entertainment and lots of separate story strands that were brought together by the bookshop.

 

This book exudes the sentiments of a good bookshop I mentioned above, it is warm, inviting and fun. It is a story about love, literature and the celebration of stories and what’s not to love about that?

 

This is the first book by Veronica Henry I have read but I shall certainly be reading more from her in the future.

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review 2017-05-05 20:53
Disappointing.
How to Make a French Family: A Memoir of... How to Make a French Family: A Memoir of Love, Food, and Faux Pas - Samantha Verant

The previews for this sounded pretty good. Divorced woman finds old flame, reconnects and then moves to France after getting married. She must adjust to being an expat, being part of a family (as well as becoming a step-mother to two children who lost their mother to cancer), learn the French language and more. 

 

Overall I think the title is misleading. It's less about making of a family but really more about author Verant coming to terms with rebuilding after her divorced/rebuilding in a new country. I had thought there might be more about family, raising the children/how they feel their way to this new family, the adjustment to being married to a Frenchman, etc. And there is quite a bit of that, but it's really how the author adjusts to all of this rather than how it's about building a family.

 

Her writing style is fairly breezy to read though but the subject matter tended to bore me. Unsurprisingly she and her husband tried to have a child of their own and once it began to move into her saga of having a baby I was just bored. I respect and understand why and how she chose to write about this but again, this was less about the family-building and more about how she adjusts to France and this family.

 

To be fair, there were certainly many interesting bits. She takes a shot (maybe not meant to be seen as such) at stuff like 'French Kids Eat Everything' by showing how her own step-children are not unlike children in the US that I've seen and heard of. They have their likes and dislikes. One sibling likes one food that the other doesn't. Max prefers a certain type of food and won't accept what the rest of the family will eat. Definitely sounds very familiar and shatters that concept that French children and their behavior are so very different or alien or "trainable". 

 

Overall it wasn't a terrible read but it wasn't quite what the book purported to be and really the only thing that makes this book stand out is that the author is in France rather than the US. It might be a good book for a Francophile or if you're someone who has to adjust to being in a new family as a step-parent (although perhaps soon to be stepchildren might find this interesting too). But I didn't find the food descriptions that fascinating or a that much of a draw in a book like this (recipes are included though).

 

I had been tempted to buy it but am glad I waited for the library.

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review 2016-10-15 02:17
ARC REVIEW: HOW TO PLAY THE GAME OF LOVE (LADIES OF PASSION) BY HARMONY WILLIAMS
How to Play the Game of Love - Harmony Williams

 

 

 

READ AND REVIEW

 

 

HOW TO PLAY THE GAME OF LOVE (LADIES OF PASSION) BY HARMONY WILLIAMS

 

 

 

Release Date:  October 17, 2016

 

 

 

SYNOPSIS

 

He’s everything she thinks she doesn’t want.

When Miss Rose Wellesley’s father threatens an arranged marriage, she knows she'd better settle on a choice quickly or end up having no say in who she marries. Fortunately, she's garnered a rare invitation to Lady Dunlop's "Week of Love" house party, an annual affair notorious for matchmaking. Her plans to expedite a proposal would go smoothly if not for the brash younger sister she must chaperone, her outspoken, disagreeable best friend, and the bullish Lord Hartfell who seems determined to dog her every step.

Lord Hartfell embodies every last thing Rose dislikes in a man. He’s domineering, tenacious, argumentative, and a little too casual with his nudity for her tastes. Worst of all, Rose can't seem to get him—or his kisses—out of her mind.

Rose is determined to find a more appropriate husband, even if her heart disagrees with how unsuitable the stubborn lord is…

 

 

BUY LINKS

 

Amazon         B & N         Google Play Books       IBooks        Kobo

 

 

 

REVIEW:  HOW TO PLAY THE GAME OF LOVE (LADIES OF PASSION) BY HARMONY WILLIAMS

 

How to Play the Game of Love (Ladies of Passion, #1)How to Play the Game of Love by Harmony Williams

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


ARC Review: How to Play the Game of Love (Ladies of Passion) by Harmony Williams

Harmony Williams and her cast of eccentric characters make for an amusing read. Told from Rose's point of view the reader is provided a glimpse into the heart of an independent minded women and her odd but lovable friends and family. Torn between what is expected of her and what she expects of herself, she has to decide what's more important. Listening to her heart or following the rules. Add in the mercurial chemistry between Rose and the wickedly frustrating Lord Hartfell and let the drama begin. I was more enamored of the secondary characters than the romance between Hartfell and Rose.



View all my reviews

 

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review 2016-09-28 00:00
How to Play the Game of Love
How to Play the Game of Love - Harmony Williams ARC Review: How to Play the Game of Love (Ladies of Passion) by Harmony Williams

Harmony Williams and her cast of eccentric characters make for an amusing read. Told from Rose's point of view the reader is provided a glimpse into the heart of an independent minded women and her odd but lovable friends and family. Torn between what is expected of her and what she expects of herself, she has to decide what's more important. Listening to her heart or following the rules. Add in the mercurial chemistry between Rose and the wickedly frustrating Lord Hartfell and let the drama begin. I was more enamored of the secondary characters than the romance between Hartfell and Rose.
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review 2016-07-10 19:55
There are a lot of books like this
The Peep Diaries: How We're Learning to Love Watching Ourselves and Our Neighbors - Hal Niedzviecki

This is a relatively interesting and amusing book about how modern technology and modern culture have created a brave new world that we don't really understand how to navigate (and which could have all sorts of unintended consequences for us. However, the book suffers from a number of problems which make it not among the best books to examine this particular moment in human history (and there are a lot of these books).

First, Niedzviecki tries to give all the different things he covers one name: Peep. Obviously that didn't stick. And the problem is that he comes off as one of those undergrads who thinks they know everything, diagnosing all our problems under his rubric. Had he been successful, and other people had taken up his concept, maybe this wouldn't have bugged me so much. But given that not a single other soul calls this stuff "Peep," it's hard to get behind. (Think of "fark," which was a far more celebrated naming of an internet phenomenon, at least at the time.)

Second, and far more importantly, this book was published in 2008. And like all books dealing with new technology in our day and age, things have changed. A lot. The best example - of numerous examples throughout the book - is Twitter, where even its creators don't seem to fully understand where Twitter was headed. The author treats it as basically a tool for oversharing. But the author cites numerous websites that have dwindled in popularity or disappeared, and services with the same fates. So it makes it much harder to take his fears seriously, as much as I may sympathize.

And there's a lot more opinion here than fact. Studies are cited, experts interviewed, but so much of the book is the author's subjective fears about the future.

And these fears undercut the conclusion in which the author takes a far more optimistic tone, one which he barely adopts throughout the previous chapters.

That being said, there were still some decent insights and I wasn't bored.

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