logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: jamison
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-08-23 17:51
Urgent Care By DJ Jamison Free!
Urgent Care (Hearts and Health Book 3) - D.J. Jamison

Twelve years too late ...
Xavier James is shocked when he runs into the first man who ever broke his heart. His ex-boyfriend has only gotten sexier over the past decade, but Xavier isn't about to go down that road again. When they cross paths at the hospital's urgent care clinic, where Xavier is doing a student nursing rotation, it's more difficult to dismiss the man. Thrown together by work and forced into close quarters, a visit to memory lane is incredibly tempting.

It's never too late to start over ...
Dr. Trent Cavendish made a huge mistake when he walked away from the love of his life at age 18. When his best friend suddenly dies 12 years later, it rattles Trent into seeing just how empty his life has become. Determined to go back to the moment he put himself on the path to ambition over happiness, he walks away from the OR and takes a temporary position in his hometown. It's time to make amends to the man he left behind.

Oh, how things have changed ...
Instead of the sweet but tame guy he left behind, Trent runs into a smoking-hot Xavier James dressed in bits of lace and silk at a gay nightclub. He never knew he had a fetish for a man in delicate clothing until now. His plan to earn Xavier's forgiveness immediately shifts to lust, and love's not far behind. But Xavier is wary of this new Trent Cavendish. The villain of his memories is considerate and kind, but Xavier wants to be more than a new goal to chase.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-10 12:46
The Recovering: Addiction & Its Aftermath
The Recovering: Intoxication and Its Aftermath - Leslie Jamison
nb. I am a recovering heroin addict with decades clean. I lived through it when some medical professionals thought I wasn't worth the effort anymore. (That still upsets me - nobody should ever give up on an addict, especially medical professionals!) My addiction is private, but it's worth a mention here since it affects how I consume recovery literature.
 

I normally stay far away from recovery memoirs, having lived one myself and heard thousands more through the years. This book, though, promised to turn "the traditional addiction narrative on its head, demonstrating that the story of recovery can be every bit as electrifying as the train wreck itself." My ears perked up and I took note. The blurb goes on to say (from the publisher):

All the while, she offers a fascinating look at the larger history of the recovery movement, and at the literary and artistic geniuses whose lives and works were shaped by alcoholism and substance dependence, including John Berryman, Jean Rhys, Raymond Carver, Billie Holiday, David Foster Wallace, and Denis Johnson, as well as brilliant figures lost to obscurity but newly illuminated here.

That interested me tremendously. I find it endlessly interesting that so many artists are sure their art is linked with their particular dysfunction -- be it mental illness, substance abuse or misogyny. And I know of some writers and other artists who have done their best work only after clearing away the wreckage of addiction (Denis Johnson, Mary Karr, David Foster Wallace, Raymond Carver to name just a few...) Jamison's theory and examples seemed (from the blurbs) to be about how the stories we tell ourselves about addiction and recovery are, in fact, part of both solution and problem. I've read enough about the hard-drinking writer. I wanted to hear about the writers who got clean and sober and continued or gone on to great success. I didn't want another quit-lit book. I wanted something deeper and more interesting. What I got was mostly (but not all) another literary drunkalog, and this ain't Tender Is The Night, Where I'm Calling From, A Moveable Feast or any of the other rather brilliant drunkalogs we have to choose from.

Jamison has been compared to such iconic writers as Joan Didion and Susan Sontag. Yet her utterly singular voice also offers something new. With enormous empathy and wisdom, Jamison has given us nothing less than the story of addiction and recovery in America writ large, a definitive and revelatory account that will resonate for years to come.

Lofty, eh? It promises not just another quit-lit recovery memoir, but something that will alter the landscape.

 

So I was mighty upset when, for the entire first half of the 544-page book, we get precious little that differs from any number of other recovery memoirs, even while she explicitly states in the text that she will not be writing "just another recovery memoir." The language in this part is practically caressed, not just massaged. Every bartender's eyes or hair rates several adjectives, every drink is served with multiple metaphors. Everything is so damned beautiful. It felt -- a lot -- like the glorification of alcoholism and the behavior that comes with it. Eventually, on her own because it seems nobody else really noticed her problem, she will get sober, relapse and start over. It's here that the tone begins to change, but we're more than halfway through 544 pages at that point. In other words, she devoted a massive amount of pages to the glorious drunken Leslie and her oh-so-uniquely artistic pain.

 

At one point she says outright that she has trouble writing without putting herself in the story, and that's clear. She makes mention of the famous writers at Iowa with her, but only in passing because we're busy learning what she likes to drink, how much of it, when and how... Once she decides to get sober, she will fail and there will be a bit more longing for drinking/scheming etc, but the shine has gone, as anyone who has relapsed could tell you in far fewer words. It's after this point that the book starts to be unique. She is an excellent journalist, and I wish she'd excised her own story from this book entirely.

 

Her drinking is written in far greater detail than her recovery. She seems to take an emotional step back the minute she gets sober. I could feel fear at her vulnerability and recovery the minute it stopped being a drunkalog. Once sobriety starts, Jamison introduces journalism, statistics and experts, so we get no "other side of the coin" to the first half of the tome -- there is no honest portrayal of Jamison sober. It's obscured by her fact-finding missions and critical readings. This is where the other writers step in to give an assist.

 

Honestly it felt a bit like she used their stories of relapse and recovery to mask her own fear that she isn't qualified to write about her own recovery. Perhaps, like any smart addict, she has a fear of relapse. If you write a book called "The Recovering" you probably hope not to have to start counting days sober again after the publication date. Instead of saying that outright, though, she shows us other writers who did exactly that. The irony is that her sponsor tells her at one point that this is her problem in life -- it seems to also be a problem in her writing.

 

Jamison leads a charmed life, drunk or not. She is in prestigious writing programs and residences throughout the entire time chronicled in this book, and she's publishing too. High-functioning isn't even close to the right word. That doesn't change her pain or disqualify her sobriety, but it's worth a mention. She says nada about insurance or paying for medical care. When she does make mention of money, it's to do things most of us will only dream of - travel, foreign research, time just to write in exotic or beautiful locales. One could imagine she saw this note coming, since she shields herself from her privilege by mentioning it a few times. 

 

But between all of that extraneous and rather privileged "just another recovery memoir," there are very interesting themes and excellent journalism. She has a great hypothesis that's buried a bit deeply, but it goes something like we are all subject to being seduced by the stories we tell ourselves and it might be good, if scary and different, to tell ourselves healthy stories rather than unhealthy ones. Artists don't have to write with their own blood, and if they do, they'll eventually bleed out. She has an excellent critical eye for reading others' writing and pulling support for her story out of their words. Those parts are extremely compelling, and I really wish that the majority of the massive amount of pages had gone to that.

 

One final thing. While she makes mention of the big names who were known to drink, some of these writers also seem to have suffered from comorbid disorders, and that is never discussed. I can't say, nor can Leslie Jamison or for that matter, her relative, author and psychologist, Kay Redfield Jamison, whether many of these suicides were caused by one specific illness - be it alcoholism or an affective disorder. I do wish these rather large topics weren't skipped. They're important, even if they don't fit neatly within the narrative built here.

 

What I would hope is that the personal story be completely excised next time and the researching, critical eye step in. Her best work is when she empathizes with the writing of others and explains it from the standpoint of one who has felt those feelings and lived to tell.

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-05-10 20:02
Is it really possible for a closet to be too big?
Orderly Affair - D.J. Jamison

Well yes, if you’re a hospital orderly named Ian Connolly who’s divorced, with a teenaged son and who is just starting to question his sexuality…at times that closet can seem huge and the doors may feel like they’re stuck shut.


But if you’re a lab tech named Callum Price…those closet doors have never really been closed and the only time you’re really in there is when you need to get clothes for work…or maybe explore an unexpected attraction with a not so straight orderly who pushes all of your buttons in the best way possible.


Ian’s been married since he was in his teens and never really had a chance to explore his bisexuality but now that he’s single again he’s determined to rectify that situation and explore his long ignored attraction to men.


Neither Ian nor Callum expected to connect with someone they knew when they start a conversation on a hook-up app. But that’s exactly what happens and both men realize from their first encounter that their attraction is off the charts…we’re not talking love at first sight here folks…nope this is most definitely lust at first sight and I’m good with that…I mean really who among us hasn’t seen someone that their first reaction to hasn’t been ‘Oh hell yeah! I’d do that.’ see…lust at first sight.


It’s as Ian and Callum’s encounters continue that they begin to get to know each other, enjoy each other and seek out the other’s company, care about the others dreams, hopes and aspirations, become supportive, turn to each other. In other words what starts as lust begins to become something more…deeper…love.


Callum and Ian are two very different people each having their own issues, concerns and problems to deal with.


Ian has a son and a family that doesn’t know he’s bisexual and that he fears may not be very accepting. He’s close to his family and doesn’t want to lose them but as things between him and Callum progress he also realizes that if he’s going to have the man who’s fast becoming a central part of his life, he’s going to have to step out of that closet that he’s been hiding in for so many years.


Callum’s gotten himself buried in responsibilities and a lot of them are of his own making. Somewhere along the way Callum’s forgotten how to stand up for himself and between a mother who doesn’t seem to appreciate her son and how hard he’s trying to take care of not just her but himself and Doug, his leach of an ex-boyfriend who doesn’t seem to understand that when the relationship’s over it’s time to move on, Callum’s burning the candle at both ends.


I loved how this story unfolded and how Callum and Ian developed a genuine friendship as well as their romantic relationship. Once again, we were given a couple that I had no problem imagining and could easily visualize not just them but their relationship as it played out.


Add in some of my catnip (insert characters from previous stories here) and you’ve me hooked. I loved this one and I’m pretty sure that I’d have to say it’s become my favorite one so far. There was a bit of everything for me there was drama, angst, even a bit of a romantic thriller, definitely sexy times and humor and everything flowed together to create a fun and interesting story that flowed easily and gives a very satisfying HFN that’s border on and tipping towards the HEA that these two men so deserve.


I’m hoping that we haven’t seen the end of this series, I have to admit I’m not sure who could come next but I’m certainly willing to hang around and see.


**************************


An ARC of Orderly Affair was graciously provided by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-05-10 19:56
YOLO!!!! Definitely an acronym to live by…
Surprise Delivery - D.J. Jamison

‘Surprise Delivery’ is the 5th book in DJ Jamison’s series ‘Hearts and Health’ and for me each story has gotten better as the series progresses. In ‘Surprise Delivery’ we get to spend more time with Dr. Casper Rollins whom we met in ‘Room For Recovery’ and Medical Director. Eric Holtz who first appeared in ‘Bedside Manner’ as best friend to one of the MCs.

 

Casper lives life to the fullest…taking risk, going on exotic vacations, seeking thrills and adventure where ever he can find them. It’s his way of honoring and celebrating the love of his live, Kage Myers. A man who lived life full on never turning away from the next challenge or adventure that it held for him…after all ‘You Only Live Once’.  The man who Casper gave his heart to and had planned to spend his life with until he was taken from him too young and too soon. Casper’s closed his heart off to any kind of romantic involvement but he’d sure love to show the hospital’s work-a-holic Medical Director how to relax and enjoy himself.

 

Eric’s always been a workaholic and with his husband leaving him and nothing but a big empty house to go home to he really doesn’t see the need to change that…at least not until Olivia (Livvie), his teenaged, pregnant niece knocks on his door in need of a place to stay and some supportive family. Something that for both Eric and Livvie is very much lacking in their lives. Eric’s missed having family so while he and his niece don’t really know each other he’s willing to give her a home and the supportive family that she desperately needs but what he doesn’t count on is the fact that helping his niece could just be what’s needed by two men who are drawn to each other but have shut themselves off from love and romance.

 

I liked both characters when we met them in earlier stories from this series so getting to see them both as their romance developed was certainly no hardship for me. There was a lot about this book that worked for me first off Casper and Eric…to me this was a perfect pairing. While they were just different enough to keep things interesting, they weren’t so different that I was left wondering what the attraction was. I was also a big fan Livvie. I liked the way the author portrayed this young lady. She was human, she made a mistake, but she was also willing to own up to what she’d done and she wanted to have a say in how she fixed things, so to speak. This worked for me because one of the things that I’ve always believed is that we all make mistakes, it’s how we take responsibility for what we’ve done and how we handle the fall out from that mistake that shows the true measure of a person’s character and Livvie showed that she was definitely someone worth knowing and going to bat for…so points to Eric for his part in helping her.

 

I also really liked Casper’s family. They loved him and while they also loved Kage that didn’t mean they wanted Casper to bury himself beside him…neither literally nor figuratively. Also, we were once again treated to a peek at couples from previous stories in this series. Something that’s catnip for me. The romantic in me just loves it when an author weaves in characters and events from previous stories adding to the depth of the story and to my emotional involvement in things.

 

While there was some angst and drama in this one for me it was just enough to keep the story interesting and engaging but not take it over the top. However, while I did enjoy the romance between Eric and Casper there were a few moments for me that were just a bit too sugary sweet and I would have enjoyed them a bit more had they been less so, but this is definitely a matter of personal taste and something that needs to be decided by the individual.

 

Overall, I really enjoyed this one, the ending was good and worked for me and the epilogue was a nice touch showing a very solid HFN for this couple with a definite lead in to a much deserved HEA and the next book in this series.

 

*************************

 

A copy of Surprise Delivery was graciously provided by the author in exchange for an honest review

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-05-06 17:13
Jamison (Farraday Country Book 10) by Chris Keniston
Jamison - Chris Keniston

 

Family, friendship and a match made in heaven lie in story for Farraday County. From the background to the main event. Jamison finally gets his chance to shine. Abbie is the woman everybody notices, but not many people truly know. This is her story. Keniston digs deep into her basket of goodies to deliver an intoxicating blend of lightly heavy romance. To find your dreams you have to open your heart to all the possibilities. With love, devotion and a helping hand in the end it all comes right. Have never met a Farraday I haven't liked.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?