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text SPOILER ALERT! 2019-10-27 23:17
The Sorting Hat Dilemma
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child - Parts I & II (Special Rehearsal Edition) - J.K. Rowling,John Kerr Tiffany,Jack Thorne

By now, it's canon that the Sorting Hat takes into account the desires of the student -- to an extent -- along with other factors. That's why there are some really glaring mis-matches in the Potterverse.

 

Hermione: Totally a Ravenclaw. 

Snape: Could easily have been Gryffindor.

 

Clearly, family history also plays into the equation. There's no way Hufflepuff-like Ron Weasley nor Huffle-claw (or Raven-puff) Neville Longbottom should be in Gryffindor, except for family legacy. 

 

Which brings us to the wonderful Scorpius Malfoy. Is there any character in the Potterverse who so nicely embodies qualities of all four houses? He is the clever scholar of Ravenclaw. He is the quiet, hard-working Hufflepuff. He is as brave as any Gryffindor. And he values his family connection to Slytherin. 

 

I know that "Harry Potter and the Cursed Child" is supposed to be Albus Severus' and Harry's story, with Scorpius and Draco merely their "doubles," but I must say, Scorpius is the best character. Without him, Albus would be insufferable, and I would not have enjoyed reading the play nearly so much. 

 

-cg

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review 2019-04-23 15:16
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child - J.K. Rowling,John Kerr Tiffany,Jack Thorne

Let's start with positive - I liked Scorpius and Draco Malfoy really surprised me pleasantly. That's it. 

 

Now, let the rant begin.

If I could separate it from Harry Potter books, it might be a rather good play but because it needs knowledge about Harry Potter characters I can't do this and it turns the whole book into a disappointment.
I was prepared to read a play and submerge into Harry Potter world but this wasn't the eighth book. This was like really bad fan fiction. One of my favourite characters was turned into a pathetic joke. Rose's role was so tiny it was almost non-existent. There was no social interaction between James and Albus and it was just weird. They were brothers and I thought at least Harry and Ginny taught their kids how to stick together but apparently they didn't. The way school didn't do anything before the 4th school year was just stupid and made me angry. Where were the teachers when the problems started on day one? Those are only few of the things that popped into my mind while reading this book. 
I have to admit that I would like to see the play because while reading I also asked several times how they would do things, like did they drop the temperature while dementors were on stage.

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review 2019-02-24 16:36
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by Jack Thorne & John Tiffany
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child - J.K. Rowling,John Kerr Tiffany,Jack Thorne

Better than I thought it would be.
In my mind I definitely wasn't giving this one a fair chance. I don't like reading in playwright format, but I flew through this one. It's not even J.K. Rowling... but that didn't matter either. These two guys that wrote this one did her stories justice.
Was I blown away to give it a perfect rating? No.
Did I like it? Overall, yes.
I liked how it picked up where the films and the last book leave off. You are left wondering what happens with Harry's family, since you get that glimpse. This story gives you everything you want and more.
What I didn't care for was the bopping around to different scenes. I get it's a play so it's different, but some were to cut and dry for me. Especially coming from such huge books from Rowling. This was like a tidbit.
Still good though, and fans of the series should read it.


3.5/5

 

 

Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2019/02/harry-potter-and-cursed-child-by-jack.html
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text 2017-12-23 19:10
16 Tasks of the Festive Season - Square #12: Festivus
The Spy Who Loved Me - Ian Fleming
The Unexpected Guest - Charles Osborne,Agatha Christie
Courts of Babylon - Peter Bodo
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child - J.K. Rowling,John Kerr Tiffany,Jack Thorne
Two Serious Ladies - Jane Bowles

 Tasks for Festivus: Post your personal list of 3 Festivus Miracles –OR– post a picture of your Festivus pole (NOTHING pornographic, please!), –OR– Perform the Airing of Grievances:  name 5 books you’ve read this year that have disappointed you - tell us in tongue-lashing detail why and how they failed to live up to expectations.

 

2017 has brought a great many books and thankfully most of them were good or entertaining or at least ok. However, there have also been some real stinkers*, and of those the following tomes have taken the proverbial Christmas cookie:

 

(* I have only considered books that I read in full. If I had considered DNF's, this list would be much longer.)

 

 

1. The Spy Who Loved Me - Ian Fleming

 

I thought I had already read the worst that Fleming could dream up when I tried to suppress to throw up all the way through From Russia With Love but this was nothing compared to the sick-fest that was The Spy Who Loved Me. I seriously would have liked to hit Bond and his creator with a shovel, repeatedly, hard, when reading that book. Even thinking about the book still brings up feelings of rage and nausea. 

 

 

2. The Unexpected Guest - Charles Osborne

 

I refuse to cite Agatha Christie as the author of this. She may have written the original play, but Osborne managed to destroy the original work as only Osborne can - with gusto and beyond any hope of repair. Even if Dame Agatha's works are sometimes a bit twisted, Osborne managed to turn this one into a farcical hot mess. Again. Like the other Christie books he turned his hand to.

 

 

3. The Courts of Babylon - Peter Bodo

 

Boy, oh boy, oh boy. This was the book that tried to set a new record of how many dumbass comments one author can cram into a book. I have no motivation to find out whether Bodo really did set a record here, and I am sorely disappointed that not only Bodo represented sports and sports reporting to thousands of viewers, readers, listeners who have over the years been subjected to his self-congratulatory, patronising, imperialist, sexist, and bigoted comments, but also that I actually finished reading this book.

 

 

4. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child - John Tiffany & Jack Thorne

 

Well, this will be brief: the author's got pretty much all of the HP characters wrong and their plot had some serious holes. This was fan-fiction at best, which is an insult to fan-fiction because this was really bad fan-fiction. No, seriously, just give it a miss and enjoy a re-read of the original HP books. 

 

 

5. Two Serious Ladies - Jane Bowles

 

I don't even know what this book was. I'm still more puzzled that this book apparently made Jane Bowles into some sort of adored writer. I don't get it. At all. This was one of the most boring, underwhelming, inconsequential books about drama-lama main characters who were so wrapped up in their first-world not-even-close-to-real-problems that ...

Nah, I can't even be bothered to waste energy airing my grievances about this one.

 

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-07-20 08:31
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by JK Rowling & John Tiffany, Jack Thorne
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child - Parts I and II (English)(Hardcover) - John Tiffany & J K Rowling Jack Thorne

Albus Severus Potter is sorted into Slytherin, and his only friend turns out to be Scorpius Malfoy, whose paternity is rumored to be Voldemort himself. Add to that the estrangement between Harry and his son, another uprising of dark powers, the emergence of a Time-Turner, Amos Diggory turning up at Harry's doorstep with a desperate request, and Harry's scar burning again which leads to ill-spoken words during a quarrel and hasty decisions - and perhaps the downfall of the wizarding world.

 

First of all, this story is told in script-form which takes away quite a bit regarding the inner motivation of characters. Most of it felt extremely like bad fanfiction, Hermione as Minister of Magic (and apparently only her marriage to Ron enables her to do that), Draco's suddenly the trio's friend, bringing back Cedric as some kind of focal point, the idea of Voldemort's child etc. And this is perhaps the greatest flaw: I didn't quite understand why Albus would attempt to restore Cedric back to life in the first place? Granted, he's unhappy, feels misunderstood and unloved by his father, but change history, probably even erasing himself from history?

 

And let's not mention all the other head-scratch moments: Amos Diggory would come to ask for Cedric's return 22 years after he'd died? Grief can do strange things, I'll grant you that. But why doesn't anyone question his motives, and especially the strange niece no one has seen before? In one of the changed timelines Albus and Scorpius humiliated Cedric during the 2nd task of the Triwizard Tournament which turns Cedric towards the Death Eaters... Really? He had a lot going for him, he was head boy, had tons of friends, and all this wouldn't count for anything because he was humiliated during the TriWi-Tournament? We're not talking about Harry, Albus or Draco here, after all, we're talking about a boy who had everything, loving parents, adoring friends. I don't buy that. (And let's not forget that when the boys try to correct their interference with the past, it's never told that they also correct that mistake, just somehow they find themselves back in the lake.)

 

Essentially, this is the story of parents and children: parents who lost their children, parents who can't connect with their children (and vice versa), and children who lost their parents, all this covered in prophecies and ridiculous time-travel. Had this been a novel I'd have expected more focus on the emotions, the relationships - and maybe then, the story would have worked better and the existence of Delphi would have been better explained: no one knew about the lovechild of Bellatrix and Voldemort?

 

But as is, the most relatable characters are Draco and Scorpius with a little helping of a Snape-cameo. The others are mere copies of their younger selves (especially when in alternate timelines Ron and Hermione restart their will they-won't they-routine). I liked the epilogue of Deathly Hallows, and I thought back then that Harry showed hard-earned maturity in advising Albus essentially to be who he is. Unfortunately he loses that maturity here altogether. Of course, all ends well, harsh words are forgiven and bridges built.

 

But while it was good to have another glimpse into the Potter-verse, I'm also somehow disgusted at such a blatant attempt at milking the cash cow just a bit further. Because let's be honest, The Cursed Child lacks detail, it lacks coherence and characterization. Quite frankly, JKR should have stopped while she was ahead instead of being lured again into the spotlight by the call of fame and money.

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