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Search tags: kou-tanaka
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review 2017-07-31 00:00
Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Vol. 4
Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Vol. 4 - ... Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Vol. 4 - Yoshiki Tanaka,Tyran Grillo Over there's not much going on action-wise in this book, it's all political maneuvering. Overall however another good read.
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review 2017-07-28 05:05
Cells at Work! (manga, vol. 1) by Akane Shimizu, translated by Yamato Tanaka
Cells at Work! 1 - Akane Shimizu

Cells at Work is a semi-educational series that takes place inside a human body and stars a bunch of anthropomorphized cells. Red Blood Cell is a cheerful delivery girl who takes oxygen to cells (I suppose they’d qualify as the “ordinary folks” of this world) and carbon dioxide back to the lungs. There are lots of potential dangers along the way, so different kinds of White Blood Cells protect everybody. One recurring character, for example, is White Blood Cell (Neutrophil) 1146, who is part of the force that acts as the body’s initial defense against foreign invaders and infectious diseases. He’s depicted as a savagely violent man who is nevertheless polite and maybe even a little friendly towards Red Blood Cell.

In this volume, readers get to see White Blood Cell and others deal with Streptococcus pneumoniae, cedar pollen, Influenza virus, and a scrape wound. This results in the introduction of characters like Helper T Cell, the violent and manly Killer T Cells, hilariously intense and dramatic Memory Cell, Mast Cell, Macrophage, the adorable Platelets, and more.

I can’t remember which review put this on my radar, but I’m glad it did. I don’t know how long I’ll be able to continue on with this series before it gets stale, but this first volume, at least, was a lot of fun.

The educational aspects were a little rough. Yes, there were little information boxes that explained what each type of cell was and what it did, what each invader was, etc., but it’s been a long time since my last Biology class, and I admit that I got a bit confused here and there. For example, I had a tough time grasping the distinction between the different kinds of white blood cells. Also, I had particular trouble translating what was happening on-page during the cedar pollen chapter to what would have actually been happening in the human body. The steroid’s actions seemed extreme. If the author had truly intended this series to be educational, then diagrams and/or a few paragraphs of explanations at the end of each chapter that went into a little more detail about what would really be happening inside the human body would have been helpful.

That said, I was certainly entertained, and I loved the way Shimizu opted to reinterpret some of the biological details. For example, since platelets are relatively small compared to a lot of the other cells, Shimizu opted to depict them as an army of adorable children. And since one of the things macrophages do is remove dead cells and cellular debris, they’re depicted as maids. Extremely violent and powerful maids. I also enjoyed the naive T cell’s transformation process.

The entire volume was fun, but my favorite chapters were probably the cedar pollen and scrape wound ones. Although the cedar pollen chapter was chaotic and occasionally a little hard to follow, Memory Cell’s habit of lurking around and issuing dire warnings made me laugh. Plus, since I’m currently dealing with allergy-related drainage and headache issues, I could definitely relate. I found it bitterly amusing to see the whole horror show depicted as confusion and overreaction on several cells’ part that just snowballed from there.

The scrape wound chapter appeared, at first, to be a rehash of the same kind of thing the cells dealt with during the Streptococcus pneumoniae chapter, with just a few slight differences. While I enjoyed several of the panels depicting particularly crazed White Blood Cells, I was a little worried that the author had already run out of ideas. That was when the Platelets came into play. I had thought they were okay but nothing particularly special earlier in the volume, but they won me over in this chapter. They made the most adorable little army. Somehow the blood-spattered White Blood Cells standing around them and protecting them made the whole thing even better.

I definitely plan on getting the next volume, but nothing beyond that just yet - I’m going to approach this series one volume at a time. I doubt there will be cliffhangers, and I don’t want to buy several volumes only to discover that the series is already stale by Volume 2. This first volume, at least, was lots of fun despite some occasionally confusing moments. Crossing my fingers that Shimizu manages to keep things fresh and interesting in the next one.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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review 2017-01-31 00:00
Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Vol. 3: Endurance
Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Vol. 3: Endurance - Daniel Huddleston,Yoshiki Tanaka This book out of the series is probably the most boring. There's lots of political maneuvering and one big battle right at the end that really doesn't amount to much. However this book really speaks volumes to what's going on today, right now. This book was written back in the 1980s and it's almost a prediction for what Dump is doing. There are protestors being beaten and shot and then blamed for "starting riots", there's the military trying to gain control of the government and then there's Trunicht.
So if you like Dump Truffle, you'll hate this book as it specifically calls out crap like that.
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review 2016-10-18 14:20
Witch’s Guide to Cooking Children ★★☆☆☆
The Witch's Guide to Cooking with Children - Yoko Tanaka,Keith McGowan

This is a revision of Hansel and Gretel, in a modern setting. A brother and sister fight off the witch who eats children. The witch no longer lives in a gingerbread house in the woods. Her woods have all be cut down and the city has grown up around it, so she now lives in an apartment building and accepts donations of from parents who are annoyed by their children. It’s a cute idea, but the story is a little muddled by seemingly pointless additional characters and the writing is not terribly engaging, compared to other middle grade books I’ve read recently. The illustrations could be interesting, but the book copy I’m using is so poorly printed that the pictures are a dark mass of graytones.

 

I can hardly complain, though. I picked this up in a thriftshop, mostly because the title caught my eye and I thought it might be amusing. I read this for the Witches square in the 2016 Halloween Bingo. This makes my 6th & 7th Bingo!

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review 2016-09-14 00:00
His Favorite, Vol. 1
His Favorite, Vol. 1 - Suzuki Tanaka This was a super cute yoai high school manga read. A little immature, but I kind of like that about YA mangas. Will definitely be reading more of this series in the future.
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