logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: lee-child
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-13 15:47
Bog Child / Siobhan Dowd
Bog Child - Siobhan Dowd

Digging for peat in the mountain with his Uncle Tally, Fergus finds the body of a child, and it looks like she’s been murdered. As Fergus tries to make sense of the mad world around him—his brother on hunger-strike in prison, his growing feelings for Cora, his parents arguing over the Troubles, and him in it up to the neck, blackmailed into acting as courier to God knows what—a little voice comes to him in his dreams, and the mystery of the bog child unfurls.

Bog Child is an astonishing novel exploring the sacrifices made in the name of peace, and the unflinching strength of the human spirit.

 

A charming YA novel. It combined two things that I love to read about—Ireland and those archaeological wonders, the bog bodies. Fergus, the main character, is out early one morning surreptitiously digging peat with his Uncle Tally when they discover the peat-stained body of a young girl. When it is determined that she is an Iron Age body, not a modern murder victim, Fergus is encouraged by the archaeologist in charge of the dig to stay interested & involved. As she has a charming daughter, Fergus is only too happy to assist them.

There are some interesting juxtapositions—Fergus’ brother is on hunger strike in prison and Cora, the archaeologist’s daughter, is struggling with an eating disorder. [As an aside, I remember listening to the news regularly in 1981 to hear about the fates of those Irish hunger strikers, especially Bobby Sands.] Fergus is a runner and is pressured into moving envelopes during his runs which presumably have something to do with IRA explosions, but he has also befriended a young Welshman stationed at the village to guard against such things. Both are seeking escape, Fergus from rural Ireland and the young solider from the coal mines of Wales. During all these pushes and pulls, between family and community, law and anarchy, Fergus must pass his final exams with at least three B marks in order to enter University at the end of the summer, to achieve his way out.

We also get some flashbacks to the life of the Bog Child, with some choices of her own to make. I went to a museum display of Bog Bodies that visited my city years ago—there was a large photo of Tollund Man who was found in Denmark and my sister & I both thought that he looked very much like our Danish grandfather, also from Jutland. What a link to the past!

Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-07-12 13:15
The Tuscan Child - Rhys Bowen

The Tuscan Child is set in WWII Italy and the 1970’s.  While the story goes back and forth between the two eras’ there is no confusion as to what is happening.    

 

WWII is told from a pilot, Hugo, whose plane has been shot down and he has landed in enemy territory where he is hidden in a monastery that had been destroyed by bombs and taken care of by a local woman whose husband is off fighting in the war.     The 1970’s centers around the pilot’s daughter, Joanna, who is searching for the beautiful boy who is mentioned in a letter she finds after her father’s death.   The beautiful boy is assumed to be the pilot and the woman’s son so she is looking for her brother.    

 

Rhys Bowen is a talented author.   She describes the scenery, the food, and the local is such detail that I could easily picture the story as I was reading.    I could smell the wonderful dishes the Italian woman, Paola, makes.   I could hear the men at the restaurant telling their tales.    I was picturing the monastery where Hugo stayed, the mountains surrounding the town, and washed out mud roads that had to be travelled to get around.

 

The Tuscan Child is amazing.   I fell into the story, got to know the characters, and loved every minute of my time reading.    I recommend picking up your own copy. 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-07-05 15:23
TBR Thursday
Berlin Game - Len Deighton
Jade City - Fonda Lee
Even - Andrew Grant
Bog Child - Siobhan Dowd
N or M? - Agatha Christie
A Poisoned Season - Tasha Alexander

The Summer of Spies continues, with Berlin Game, Even and N or M?  I get double points for Even, as it is a spy novel and its author, Andrew Grant, will be attending When Words Collide in August.

 

Plus two more books towards the When Words Collide conference:  Jade City and A Poisoned Season.  Both authors, Fonda Lee and Tasha Alexander, will be in attendance.  Tasha Alexander is one of the replacements for Deanna Raybourn (along with her husband, Andrew Grant, above).

 

And I've got only 1 renewal left for Bog Child, so I better just read it and return it to the library!

 

I've made great progress on the stack of books from the library--I'm down to one teetering stack rather than two!  My boyfriend is currently getting ready to move and is paring down his books, so he's been making some comments about the stacks around my house, cheeky bugger!  I've been having great luck at the used book store lately and I'm running out of shelves, but eventually those books will return to said store.  Having said that, a reorganization may be in order this weekend. 

 

Good reading, friends!

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-28 18:42
A book of its time
A Child's Anti-Slavery Book Containing a Few Words about American Slave Children and Stories of Slave-Life. - Various

So this book was published pre-American Civil War, and is designed to show white children why slavery is wrong.  Therefore, it mentions God quite a bit.  There are some true stories related for children as well.

 

Part of the Summer Read

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-24 19:45
Reeve of Veils (Inheritance #4)
Reeve of Veils (Inheritance) (Volume 4) - Amelia Faulkner

Hmmm, not sure what to make of this one. 

 

First, this goes back to Knight of Flames timeline and gives us Freddy's POV, so there's a lot that's repeated. Pretty much the first and last quarter of the book, in fact, and I ended up skimming the bulk of those parts, looking only for new details. About the only new thing we learn during those parts is that Freddy's a bigger jerk than I originally thought he was. We get confirmation of his powers, which are more extensive than hinted at prior to this.

 

As for the new stuff in the middle, well... Freddy's a jerk and I prefer not to read POVs of jerks. Mikey's somewhat better, but he's been a victim for so long that he (and Freddy) actually deludes himself into believing he's left that behind even as he willingly becomes Freddy's literal plaything. Which brings me to the second thing.

 

Second, there's just no way to see Freddy and Mikey's relationship as anything other than D/s, which is a dynamic I don't enjoy. Just because Freddy thinks he's doing good by Mikey and Mikey's getting out of the ghetto doesn't erase that. Freddy might want to see themselves as equals for whatever reasons he needs to, but they're really not.

 

Plus, Freddy's just not that good of a guy. He's not a complete bastard, but he's barely one sidestep away from Kane - and even that's only until he succeeds in his plan to off dear old daddy, which I assume is the next book, and then he will be exactly like Kane. (Actually, I'd argue that he's worse than Kane, since at least Kane's victims know they're victims. Freddy's don't.) Morals and ethics mean nothing to this guy. Or to Mikey. So I guess they are perfect for each other in that respect, but they're certainly not a couple I'm rooting for or care about, and the insta-love here is just completely unbelievable given that Freddy's practically a sociopath.

 

Ok, I give Freddy credit for not violating Mikey's sexual consent (or so he claims). But since he violates consent in every single other respect with everyone around him, that credit doesn't get him very far. It gets him a crumb. A crumb ground into dust.

 

The good news is you don't actually have to read this book. The last two books made it perfectly plain that Freddy's manipulating Laurence and how, and that he's trying to line up Quentin to kill their dad. So this book ends at pretty much the same point as the previous book, just with a bit more info than we had before. 

 

Two more little nitpicks:

 

Mikey's a drug dealer and a high school dropout who's never been outside San Diego. He's not going to measure distances by kilometers. This same thing happened with Laurence in the last book. We use feet and miles in the USA. There are various conversion charts and calculators available online. This sort of error shouldn't happen, and it pulled me out of the story both times.

 

And lastly, mailbox flags work the exact opposite of how they're used here. When you have outgoing mail, you raise the flag. When the mailman comes, he lowers the flag and leaves the incoming mail. If the flag is up, that means the mail hasn't been delivered yet, not that it has been.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?