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url 2017-06-02 12:36
Attention 'Doctor Who' fans: TARDIS to land in the form of a free library

Dan Zemke, 28, of Detroit has been a fan of Doctor Who for years. He's wanted to build a replica of the show's TARDIS, or Time And Relative Dimension in Space time machine, for a while now.

 

On Saturday, he'll unveil his version: The 10-foot tall, 1-ton structure will serve as a shared library at the corner of Vermont and Warren in Detroit's historic Woodbridge neighborhood.

 

TARDIS

Source: www.usatoday.com/story/life/nation-now/2017/05/31/dr-who-fans-detroit-get-its-own-tardis-form-free-library/360437001
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url 2017-05-30 19:08
Library Reads June 2017: The top ten books published this month that librarians across the country love.
Magpie Murders: A Novel - Anthony Horowitz
Silver Silence - Nalini Singh
The Waking Land - Callie Bates
Down Among the Sticks and Bones - Seanan McGuire
Do Not Become Alarmed - Maile Meloy
The Alice Network - Kate Quinn
The Child - Fiona Barton
The Little French Bistro - Nina George
The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo - Taylor Jenkins Reid
Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore: A Novel - Matthew J. Sullivan
Source: libraryreads.org/june-2017-libraryreads
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url 2017-04-05 18:11
This month's giveaways (Early Reviewers) are up at LibraryThing
The Card Catalog: Books, Cards, and Literary Treasures - Carla D. Hayden,Library of Congress
Curious Minds: A Knight and Moon Novel - Phoef Sutton,Janet Evanovich
The Loyal Son: The War in Ben Franklin's House - Daniel Mark Epstein
A Hiss Before Dying: A Mrs. Murphy Mystery - Rita Mae Brown

There's more than the ones I show above, those just caught my eye.

 

The Card Catalog: Books, Cards, and Literary Treasures from the Library of Congress sounds a particulalry quirky find:

"Description: The Library of Congress brings booklovers an enriching tribute to the power of the written word and to the history of our most beloved books. Featuring more than 200 full-color images of original catalog cards, first edition book covers, and photographs from the library's magnificent archives, this collection is a visual celebration of the rarely seen treasures in one of the world's most famous libraries and the brilliant catalog system that has kept it organized for hundreds of years. Packed with engaging facts on literary classics—from Ulysses to The Cat in the Hat to Shakespeare's First Folio to The Catcher in the Rye—this package is an ode to the enduring magic and importance of b..."

 

 

Source: www.librarything.com/er/list
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review 2017-02-03 03:05
Invisible Library series is ridiculously fun
The Burning Page - Genevieve Cogman

My latest at B&N SciFi.

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review 2016-12-12 20:19
The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
The Invisible Library - Genevieve Cogman

I have to admit that I tend towards books that are on the intense and emotion-heavy side, especially with speculative fiction. So it’s fun to every so often read a lighter book. The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman is a great one to turn to in those moods. It’s a light and fun fantasy, with some cool worldbuilding and interesting mystery elements. It’s also Cogman’s debut, and I’m looking forward to the rest of the series.

The Invisible Library is narrated by Irene, an agent of the Library, which collects fictions from across different realities and worlds. I liked Irene a lot–she’s capable and has a lot of strength and knowledge. In some ways, she’s not very confident, but these mostly stem from the hierarchies and politics of the Library itself, rather than internal doubts.

I also enjoyed the central conceit of the story, and I thought Cogman did a nice job of making it internally consistent. While the Library bears basically no resemblance to the living, breathing libraries I’ve worked in, Cogman also generally avoids being precious about the sacred value of learning. (Public libraries in particular are weird and wonderful places that aren’t exactly sacred sanctums of Knowledge.)

I thought the mystery element was pretty well played out–it can be tricky to balance a mystery when there are lots of extra fantastical bits going on at the same time. There were a couple of moments that were genuinely horrifying, although they never overwhelmed the overall tone of the book. I certainly didn’t guess the ending, and I thought the book did a good job of showing Irene and Kai as competent without being superhuman.

I’ll also note that the main Inspector in the alternate world is Indian. Irene herself seems to be canonically bisexual (although that term is never used); she’s been romantically interested in women in the past, but describes her type as dark and dangerous, and seems into at least one male character. I can’t say whether those representations are done well–there was one moment I have some questions about.

Some books end with everything neatly wrapped up and resolved. Others end with things mostly resolved. And still others end with new revelations and questions. The Invisible Library is definitely in the third category, which unfortunately is my least favorite of the three. However, I do genuinely want to know how it will play out. To the extent this works for me, it’s because the set up had been becoming more complicated throughout the whole book, rather than having a Surprise!Info dump ending.

All in all, despite a few minor quibbles, this was a really enjoyable fantasy, with some cool elements and nice characters. I’ll definitely be looking forward to reading the next one.

Source: bysinginglight.wordpress.com/2016/08/19/the-invisible-library-by-genevieve-cogman
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