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Search tags: lost-and-then-found
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review 2018-04-09 03:19
Wild
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail - Cheryl Strayed

I did not like Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail very much.  I just couldn’t get past Cheryl Strayed’s unpreparedness for long-distance hiking and found her a distasteful person who I didn’t particularly want to spend time with.  I also found the narrative disorganized and the insights she gained from her journey pedestrian. If Wild hadn’t been the selection for my office book club, I probably would not have finished the book.  As it was, partway through I stopped reading and started skimming.

 

Several of my co-workers also didn’t like Wild very much either, including one person who said that she expected much more from the author of Tiny Beautiful Things (which I have not read).  A number of others hadn’t finished, but had seen the movie, so we spent as much time comparing the book to the movie and discussing other wilderness journey movies as discussing the book itself.

 

In other news, the office book club appears to be turning into a book-to-movie club, which isn’t actually such a bad thing. Our first selection was Room, our second was Wild, and our next choice is The Immortal Life of Henrietta LacksThe Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a re-read for me (I listened to the audiobook a few years ago). I’m looking forward to re-reading it and  I’m interested to hear what the others think. And we’ll see how the scheduling goes, but we’re also starting to kick around the idea of a movie night where we watch the movies and talk some more.

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review 2018-03-03 17:56
Lost and Found by Rick R. Reed Review
Lost and Found - Rick R. Reed

On a bright autumn day, Flynn Marlowe lost his best friend, a beagle named Barley, while out on a hike in Seattle’s Discovery Park.

On a cold winter day, Mac Bowersox found his best friend, a lost, scared, and emaciated beagle, on the streets of Seattle.

Two men. One dog. When Flynn and Mac meet by chance in a park the next summer, there’s a problem—who does Barley really belong to? Flynn wants him back, but he can see that Mac rescued him and loves him just as much as he does. Mac wants to keep the dog, and he can imagine how heartbreaking losing him would be—but that's just what Flynn experienced.

A “shared custody” compromise might be just the way to work things out. But will the arrangement be successful? Mac and Flynn are willing to try it—and along the way, they just might fall in love.

 

Review

The idea of this book is great. I love the emotionial complexity around how to deal with the issue of the dog. I also like how the relationship unfolds and some of the class and regional issues that come up. I also like the complex figures of some of the elders in the story.

 

What I struggled with the kind of ick portrayal of one of the hero's friends. And then she, after meaning so much to the hero, just vanishes.

 

Then, one hero makes a pretty big decision which I could believe in if it was really talked out but it wasn't so it feels odd.

 

We don't get enough after they are really together time to make this love story work for me.

 

The dog, of course, is great.

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review 2018-02-21 17:53
Lost & Found by Jacqueline Sheehan
Lost & Found - Jacqueline Sheehan

This book was dripping in sadness and grief. It didn’t make me weepy or a sobbing mess but I did read it with a constant pain in my chest almost the entire time. First it was for Rocky and then it was for Lloyd and later it was for the both of them! I wasn’t quite expecting to have this reaction but dog books can do that to me.

Things start out on a sad note when the author throws you headfirst into the life and grief of Rocky who has recently lost her husband to a heart attack far too early. It’s sad and her recollections of her beloved Bob are often quite funny which makes the grief hit you all that much harder. Unable to stick around in the house where she and Bob shared a life, she decides to leave her career and her life completely behind and hops a ferry in Portland, Maine and heads to Peaks Island to mourn. She reinvents herself on the island and impulsively becomes the new Animal Control Warden. 

I’ve been to Peaks and it is a little slice of yesterday and I enjoyed reading about life on the island and the descriptions almost make you feel like you are there. The rest of the book follows Rocky through her grieving process as she meets new people and becomes invested in the life of an injured stray dog with sad eyes she names Lloyd. You can guess what happens between Rocky and Lloyd, right? But all doesn’t go smoothly nor does it go sweetly. Lloyd has a history that Rocky is soon sorry she’s delved into. There’s a little mystery and a lot of quirky character building. It’s a little slow here and there and took me longer to finish than it should have but I’m not sorry I read it. If you’re a dog lover you might want to put this on your list.

“He is dog. His life is ocean, stick, ball, sand, grass, ride in the truck, sleep by the bed, look deep into the eyes of humans, lure them outdoors, greet them with a burst of joy when they come home, love them. Fill this brief life with more. “

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text 2017-12-28 18:00
Favourite 10 books of 2017
The Hate U Give - Angie Thomas
Daughter of Smoke and Bone (Daughter of Smoke and Bone Trilogy) by Taylor, Laini (2012) Paperback - Laini Taylor
Traitor to the Throne - Alwyn Hamilton
Horizons (Phobos #4) - Victor Dixen
The Final Empire. Mistborn Book One - Brandon Sanderson
A Court of Wings and Ruin - Sarah J. Maas
The Crown's Game - Evelyn Skye
Warcross - Marie Lu
The Upside of Unrequited - Becky Albertalli
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail - Cheryl Strayed

Out of the 82 books I read (hopefully 83 if I manage to finish Outlander before the end of the year), those were my favourites (well, I took all my 5 stars read of 2017 and chose 10 out of those, it's not really a scientific rating):

 

1. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas: because this book was EVERYTHING. You need to read it if you haven't yet.

 

2. Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor: and the whole trilogy. I totally enjoyed this unique universe with those amazing characters, a must read!

 

3. Traitor to the Throne by Alwyn Hamilton: just WOW! This series is just so important for me, I love this world.

 

4. Phobos4 by Victor Dixen: this is the last book in my favourite series of 2016. This conclusion was epic.

 

5. The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson: I just can't understand how I had never read Sanderson before this year. He is such an amazing author and I can't wait to discover more of his work.

 

6. A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J Maas: well, this series is one of my favourite of all time and this book did not disappoint.

 

7. The Crown's Game by Evelyn Skye: I love this series full of Russian magic. I fell in love with the author's universe.

 

8. Warcross by Marie Lu: because, Marie Lu + video game = perfection.

 

9. The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli: a beautiful book with a strong message. This book made me open my eyes.

 

10. Wild by Cheryl Strayed: I think it is the first time ever a non-fiction book is on my top 10. But this was such a great experience, I had to include it.

 

What were some of your favourite books this year?

 

Thanks for reading,

 

Line.

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review 2017-12-21 22:49
Extreme hiking.
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail - Cheryl Strayed
Wild was a book that had been on my tbr pile for a while, so when I heard that the author was coming to our local Lit Fest, this seemed the perfect time to pick it up and read it. 

I don't know quite what I was expecting, but it was not a memoir about hiking for three months across gruelling terrain with a huge backpack attached. However, such was the crazy adventure that Cheryl Strayed tackled back in 1995, before the days of internet or mobile phones. Having done minimal research, she had very little idea of what to expect and her guide book for the trail became her bible. 

The agonies of the journey were lurid - boots that were too small, causing extreme damage to her feet; blistering, bruising and loss of toe-nails, as well as abrasions on her hips and shoulders from the weighty backpack that she dubbed Monster. But to her credit, she stumbled on, mile after mile, through extremes of temperature and weather, up and down mountains thousands of feet high. Her daily mileage increased from an initial, slow, eight miles per day, to a blistering nineteen as her fitness increased.

Unfortunately for the reader, she wrote the account quite a number of years after completing the hike and the book felt like it had lost its immediacy. I trudged along with her, but there wasn't much in the way of excitement or detail and the scenery was not in my head like the sore feet were.

The death of her mother at just 45 was the trigger for the journey and by the end of it, it appeared that she had achieved her objective of putting her demons to rest. Although hiking would not be my solution to such problems, it worked for Ms Strayed, and that was what mattered. 

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