logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: madness
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-05-29 06:02
Madness by Marya Hornbacher
Madness: A Bipolar Life - Marya Hornbacher
  • Madness: A Bipolar Life
  • Marya Hornbacher
  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; Reprint edition (April 1, 2009)
  • ISBN-10: 0547237804
  • ISBN-13: 978-0547237800

 

I actually didn't finish this book. Marya Hornbacher writes well, and goes into depth about what depression and bipolar, but after the first 3rd of the book, it seemed long. I could feel her pain dealing with her mental illness. I don't think I was ready to read the whole book. I've not really ever been a strong non fiction reader so i'm not sure if it were that or the subject matter.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-24 04:05
Review: A Moment of Madness by Brooklyn Skye
A Moment of Madness - Brooklyn Skye

http://witandsin.blogspot.com/2017/03/review-moment-of-madness-by-brooklyn.html

 

An awkward meet cute that involves a bar, a beard, a dying houseplant, and a drunk cousin is just the start of the fun in A Moment of Madness. Brooklyn Skye’s second Boston Alibi story is both hot and humorous, which made it a thoroughly enjoyable read.

Sailor is a former drug addict who has worked hard to get clean and put her life back together. As a teenager, she turned her back on her father, and now that he’s gone she’s looking for redemption by trying to make his bar a success. Sailor’s past made her a rather unique heroine and I liked and admired her for her strength and determination to make amends and be a better person. She’s a funny, caring woman who’s a bit goofy and a lot of fun to read about. When she walks into the Alibi, ready to make an offer on the bar, she’s stunned to learn that the current owner is her previous night’s one-night stand. She and Ryan hit it off from the start (even with the aforementioned pitiful plant and drunk cousin in the way), but Ryan doesn’t trust the woman who turned her back on the man who was like a father to him. Their mutual attraction (and the fact that the bar is short-staffed) means that Ryan can’t ignore her, no matter how much he may want to. Ryan is gruff, but he can also be sexy and interesting. He definitely has trust issues when it comes to Sailor, but when the two of them are on the same page they make an excellent pair, both in bed and out.

Where A Moment of Madness falters is the climax of the story. The dreaded “big misunderstanding” comes into play (a personal pet peeve which may not bother other readers) and it takes the shine off of Ryan. There was also a dropped thread, which was minor but bugged me a bit. Even with these quibbles, I thought Ryan and Sailor’s story was fun and I liked it enough that I will definitely pick up the first Boston Alibi book, A Moment of Weakness.


FTC Disclosure: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Source: witandsin.blogspot.com/2017/03/review-moment-of-madness-by-brooklyn.html
Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-03-15 00:00
A Moment of Madness
A Moment of Madness - Brooklyn Skye ARC Review: A Moment Of Madness (Boston Alibi) By Brooklyn Skye

Ryan may be the strong, silent type, but his bedroom manner has Sailor's body singing. Unfortunately, that melodic feeling quickly loses it's charm when Sailor drops a bomb. Mr. Strong, Sexy and Silent becomes difficult, grudging and off limits. A Moment of Madness is a journey of redemption, temptation, forgiveness and compromise. Sailor made many mistakes that not only hurt the people she loved the most, but left her with regrets, guilt and pain on so many levels. Her quest to salve her heartache and honor her father while reconnecting with his spirit, is to obtain the place he valued in life and make it a success. There's just one problem. The bar of her dreams is now in the hands of the guy of her fantasies. Will Sailor learn to forgive herself? Can Ryan let go of anger and pride? Can they work together in tribute to a man they both loved? Who knew booze could mend fences and build bonds.
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-11 14:22
Brain on Fire
Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness - Susannah Cahalan,Heather Henderson

 

 

Susannah Cahalan was a healthy 24-year-old working as a reporter for the New York Post when she began to have seemingly unrelated and inexplicable symptoms, such as memory problems, sensitivity to light, anxiety, mood swings, food aversions, and insomnia.  Tests revealed nothing unusual, and her neurologist was convinced she was a heavy drinker who just needed to lay off the sauce.  After a seizure and a psychotic break, Cahalan woke up at NYU Hospital with gaping holes in her memory.  Tests continued to yield no clues until neurosurgeon Souhel Najjar asked her to draw a clockface and write in all the numbers, 1-12.  In her drawing, Cahalan crammed all of the numbers into the right half of the sphere she had drawn.  This caused Dr. Najjar to suspect that the right hemisphere of her brain was inflamed.  Once that was confirmed, the medical team was able to home in on a diagnosis.  Cahalan's condition was a  rare auto-immune disease, anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.  This condition was causing her body to attack her brain.  Once identified, the anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis could be treated, and a slow but steady recovery made possible.

 

This true-life medical mystery makes for an interesting--and harrowing--narrative.  The fear and frustration that Cahalan, her family, and her boyfriend experienced during the process are palpable.  I recommend this book with just a small caveat that for me, the ending fell a bit flat for me.  I guess I wanted just a bit more.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-06 02:02
The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie by Jennifer Ashley
The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie - Jennifer Ashley

As usual, I regret that I didn’t review this sooner. My memories of this book are fuzzier than I’d like, but at least I took notes while reading. I’ll do the best I can.

Beth Ackerley used to be an elderly woman’s companion until the woman died and left everything to her. Now Beth is a wealthy but lonely widow. She thinks that marrying Lyndon Mather will help relieve her loneliness, until Lord Ian Mackenzie warns her about Mather’s mistresses. Since her idea about remarrying didn’t work out, Beth decides to travel to Paris and spend her time painting instead (never mind that she has never painted before in her life).

The thing is, Ian has decided that Beth is going to be his wife - not because he has fallen instantly in love with her, but rather because he wants to have sex with her, and sex with a respectable lady like Beth requires marriage (even Beth wonders at the logic of this). He follows her to Paris, where she asks that the two of them be lovers, but nothing more. The situation is complicated by several murders. An inspector warns Beth that Ian is probably the killer and can’t be trusted, while Beth finds herself unable to believe that Ian could ever murder anyone. But Ian is definitely hiding something

I had heard lots of good things about this book when it first came out. It’s been sitting in my TBR for ages, and a recent Booklikes Romance Readalong gave me a reason to finally dig into it. It...was not what I’d hoped for.

One of the appeals of this book is its unusual hero, who the author wrote as having Asperger’s syndrome. Those exact words were never used in the text - Ian was instead called “mad” and committed to an insane asylum by his own father when he was only 10 years old. He was later released by his eldest brother. In the book’s present, Ian obsessively collects Ming bowls and considers himself incapable of love.

I’d love to read a review of this book written by someone with Asperger’s. I wasn’t entirely sure how I felt about this aspect of the book. On the one hand, the details of Ian’s behavior fit with what little I knew about Asperger’s. On the other hand, I wondered about the accuracy of the book’s depiction of Ian’s relationships with others.

It bugged me, a lot, that for most of the book Ian couldn’t seem to interact with Beth in any way except sexually. Sometimes they talked about their personal lives, but their conversations almost always veered towards sex, even before Beth broke off her engagement to Mather (which, by the way, struck me as hypocritical). I expect romance novels to have actual romance in them, but for the most part this book just had lusting and sex. And as much as Beth referred to Ian as her “friend,” there was also very little in the way of what I’d call “friendship building” scenes.

There were some nice moments. For example, I loved the scene in which Beth rattled off some details about Ian’s newest Ming bowl acquisitions and then told Ian that she’d picked up a book on the subject. This was the kind of thing I’d have liked to see more of. Unfortunately, I could probably count these kinds of lovely scenes on one hand. I felt like Beth and Thomas, Beth’s deceased husband, had a stronger and more appealing on-page relationship than Beth and Ian. Awkward.

Aside from my issues with Ian and Beth’s almost purely sexual relationship, I also had problems with Beth in particular. For a woman who considered herself to be at least a little worldly, she had terrible self-preservation instincts. That’s the only thing I can think of to explain her decision to ask Ian to be her lover when, only minutes before, an inspector told her that Ian might be a murderer. I couldn’t understand why Beth believed in Ian so strongly. I mean, through less rosy lenses Ian’s behavior could easily have been interpreted as that of a predator. Shortly after meeting Beth, he told her things he knew would prompt her to end her engagement to Mather. Then he relentlessly pursued her, despite only recently having met her. Oh, and he also attempted to strangle the inspector right in front of her.

Then there was the scene in which Beth agreed to marry Ian. I loathed that scene and, if I had been Beth, I’d have held what Ian and Mac did against them for a long time. They decided they knew what was best for her, and then they did their best to make sure she had little choice but to go along with them. I wish she had raged at them, or been icily angry at them. Instead she just gave in. Some of the best moments in Ian and Beth’s relationship happened after this point, but absolutely none of it was good enough to make up for that one scene. I’m not a book thrower, but I came very close to doing just that.

Anyway, the mystery subplot was interesting and kept me going, even though the resolution was messy and unsatisfying. This was a quick read that kept my attention, but unfortunately it wasn't anywhere near as good as I had expected it to be. Also, none of the very obvious sequel-bait left me with a desire to read anything else in this series. Mac and Isabella’s relationship, in particular, struck me as being more unpleasant than intriguing.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?