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Search tags: my-grandmother-asked-me-to-tell-you-shes-sorry
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review 2017-06-11 05:44
Badly Executed, But A Journey of Closure Worth Reading...
My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry: A Novel - Fredrik Backman

If there is any thing about Fredrik Backman books that I want to talk about, its his characters he created. My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry is filled with colorful characters. Weirdos in their own way, witty to some. And for a time, they are memorable in a simple design. Sadly, I can't say much about the plot. While A Man Called Ove is formulated with a design that is predictable (you can read my previous review), My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry is quite a mess. There is a main plot written, but the chapters on each page is just every where. There are times I have no idea whether the intention of reading is to see how fast a reader can capture the idea between the real world and the imaginary world. Of course, I do understand the reason behind this writing because this is from the perspective of Elsa, the little protagonist of this book but then, there are times I got confuse as to where is Miapolis or Mitabulous and who is Sam, which I later found out int he chapters and the origin of some of the characters weren't clear to me. The weakness of this book is the execution, which I do find it hard to follow. Maybe that's one of the reasons why it took longer time to read it as my interest was no longer the need to follow up but eventually, I finished it today.

 

Of course, there are some good points. For one - the dialogue. As always, its well written. I did smile from time to time whenever Elsa makes a smart remark. Yes, she is rude but then as a character design, she has part of her grandmother's traits, her mum's compassion and of course, some of her dad's. I can say that this is well-thought of. Whenever she interacts with the characters, its the mind that matters most of what she thinks. That adds a little realism of children today (I know, I taught kids in school and some were rude without realizing they are rude but it was not intentional). Then of course, Fredrik Backman added some other elements like calling a vehicle Taxi or Renault as a name, which adds some thing special to it. I like how kids are given a freedom to think for themselves, maybe because every thing happens in Sweden? I do not know what's it like in Sweden but I believe, as its written, it is how it is. I do not judge it because of how rude she is, but how she does make a point.

 

As for the rest of the characters, its just as its meant to be. It's a journey of forgiveness and closure. I love how Britt-Marie as a character isn't as what it seems. The things that we say 'no matter how bad people they are, there are some good in them', which I do believe its true. Not many do thought of it this way but I have met some people or children that no matter how much bad they had shown, there are some good in them. What make's this journey in reading is how important it is to have closure, even though the execution of it was not done smoothly, for me that is. This suffer's the rating I have given to this book.

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text 2015-11-30 07:26
"My Grandmother Asked Me To Tell You She's Sorry" Reading progress update: I've listened 96 out of 662 minutes.
My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry: A Novel - Fredrik Backman

I've never read anything by Fredrik Backman before. I bought the book because the title intrigued me and anyway, who could resist the little girl and the scarf-wearing dog on the cover?

 

It turns out that the book was originally written in Swedish. It seems to be my year for Scandinavian books, what with "The Readers Of Broken Wheel Recommend" and "Norwegian By Night". This one promises to keep up the high standard.

 

At the start of the novel Elsa is seven and her grandmother, Elsa's personal super-hero, is seventy-seven. The two of them are in league with one another against a world too stupid to see that being different is a gift.

 

Odd but engaging, just like its main characters, this book has already made me smile and I'm sure its going to make me cry before its done but along the way, I expect to the gift of seeing the world afresh.

 

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