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review 2017-09-22 00:23
Toni FGMAMTC's Reviews > The Butterfly Project
The Butterfly Project - Emma Look Scott
The Butterfly ProjectThe Butterfly Project by Emma Scott
My rating: 5 of 5 stars


Zelda and Beckett have painful pasts. Both are struggling every moment with the emotional baggage. The author does an excellent job of putting the reader in their shoes. I easily understood their actions and feelings. I love these characters and how they don't play romance games. I suppose because they have seen firsthand how real consequences can be, they take life seriously. Both characters are sort of stuck and having trouble moving forward. They help to bring each other around to a better place. I definitely recommend The Butterfly Project. It's entertaining, but it also leaves you thinking. It's not a book that you can just finish and forget. The occasional drawings are a bonus that really adds to the storyline.


***Copy given in exchange for an honest review***

Fangirl Moments and My Two Cents

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Source: fangirlmomentsandmytwocents.blogspot.com/2017/09/the-butterfly-project-by-emma-scott.html
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review 2017-09-16 16:52
Book Review: Royal Attraction
Royal Attraction - Tiffany Truitt

Damn book made me cry!


*ARC received from Entangled Publishing, LLC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.*

Once again, I'm reminded that I'm an only child and I still long for an older brother.

SPOILER FREE REVIEW

"I'll pretend that seeing you here doesn't drive me wild. I'll ignore all the things my body wants to do to yours. I'll forget the fact that you leaving without a good-bye wrecked me." 

I swear I picked up this book because it has modern princes, and it's set in a palace, the palace.

The story was really fascinating. They're three British royal brothers and an American girl who grew up together. They even have their own hangout place outside the palace just to feel normal once in a while. But truly the story points back to Aly who doesn't believe in herself. She thinks all she does is break things, she never does the right things, and she wants to be perfect for the perfect image that the press wants from her. But its's not just Aly who has problems, all four of them do. They're forced to give up a part of their soul for the crown and pretend to be people who they're not. That's always the main problem when one has responsibilities on their shoulder and a role to play. There was a lot of conflict and issues all throughout but the resolution for this book was more than what I could have expected.

England, looking down at me, begging me to help mend his son's relationship when I was the one to shatter it. 

Each of the main characters are well created with certain personalities that make them different from each other yet they have some points in common. My favorite character is Oliver (Ollie) Dudley, and not just because he's smoking hot and utterly sexy but he does things for a purpose. He may seem reckless but they are actually well calculated actions. Compared to Aly who's almost like a little whimp and all she knows is how to run away. 

A lot of things have changed, but some never will. 

I love how this book is written in one person's point of view but it is divided between the past and the present. Also it is labeled at what age, month, and day it happened and there are also the early morning events where it's labeled are 'barely' it makes me laugh sometimes. Shifting from past to present are one of the types of writing style I adore because then it'd be very thrilling when they meet and tie in the end. The writing is also light and easy to read, though sometimes I look up a couple of words. It does uses a lot of British slang that I do not know the meaning off but that doesn't bother me at all.

"Life is incredibly, mercilessly short. There are so many things that come for us that we won't be able to fight. Save your fear for them. But all those pesky other things, the things that nearly destroy us but don't, we always manage to get back up. Always. Our fear is wasted on them." 

I would recommend this to those who enjoy reading about princes, or book set in a royal palace and if one is curious about what goes on behind closed doors. If you want your heart to be crumpled a bit, and perhaps a little sweet fun then this is for you. It does have a bit of sexual activities here and there but nothing major since this is a romance and not an erotica.

Be human. Be honest. Be you. 

Best advice ever.

Source: www.goodreads.com/review/show/2110296773?book_show_action=false
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review 2017-09-14 20:55
The Smallest Thing
The Smallest Thing - Lisa Manterfield
Emmott Syddall wants nothing more than to leave her small town and move to London.  She does not want to become another dead Syddall buried in the small Eyam cemetery.   Emmott make plans to move to London with her boyfriend, Roland right before her 18th birthday.  However, before she can get out of Eyam, her neighbors begin dying.  At first, it looks like a weird flu, but no one really knows, and then, Eyam is quarantined.  There is no leaving, the exits are surrounded by military patrol.  Relief workers in yellow haz-mat suits flood the town and begin asking questions.  No one wants to go out and about or interact with anyone else.  Except for Emmott, who just wants to escape and her father, who just wants to help his neighbors.  Emmott's mind begins to change about leaving when a suited up relief worker named Aiden begins visiting.
 
The Smallest Thing is a creative re-imagining of the self-imposed quarantine of the village of Eyam in the 1660's due to the plague.  At that point in time, the villagers of Eyam were seen as selfless, heroic- allowing the plague to ravage them, saving countless others.  In modern times, with social media and aggressive TV reporters, the town is a spectacle, the victims are no more than statistics. Emmott is very easy to identify with, restless and burgeoning on adulthood, her story is one of growth and finding her place.  I enjoyed watching her change her opinion of her father from a fearful man who is tying her down, to a hero who allowed her to grow.  The virus also interested me, this was not just a resurgence of the plague, but something unknown, brought about possibly by climate change and increased human movement.  The romance in this felt just right, not rushed, not insta-love, but definitely intensified by the situation. If not for the fact that it was a haz-mat suit, the fact that Emmott saw nothing but Aiden's eyes felt almost exotic  their connection was based on something deeper than physical attraction when Emmott wants nothing more than to connect with someone.  Overall, a heartfelt story of devastation and how a community can pull through. 
 
This book was received for free in return for an honest review. 
 

 

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review 2017-09-10 03:36
Ready Player One
Ready Player One - Ernest Cline

A young man harnesses his inner geek for the ultimate 80’s pop culture challenge in this Young Adult novel. Review time!

 

I picked up Ready Player One on a complete and total whim. I wanted something to listen to during my commute and the cover caught my eye. Boy, I am so glad it did! The book is a character-driven novel with epic world-building and a cool premise. Wade Watts is a driven, smart, and crafty character. The relationships he builds with secondary characters, even the villain, is rewarding. He even meets the girl of his dreams! Along with interesting characters is a well-constructed setting. Cline creates two worlds flawlessly – the dystopian United States and the virtual reality of the Oasis. Cline’s descriptions occasionally got repetitive, but the other elements more than make up for it.

 

Now some people may be less enamored with this book than I. It focuses on gaming culture and the 1980′s decade. If those two subjects bore you to tears, you will not enjoy this novel. If you are interested in reading it, check out the audiobook narrated by Will Wheaton. It is absolutely phenomenal!

 

tl;dr A phenomenal dystopian novel featuring a driven protagonist, 80′s trivia, and gaming culture.

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review 2017-09-10 03:34
A Court of Wings and Ruin
A Court of Wings and Ruin - Sarah J. Maas

Feyre’s journey concludes in this New Adult fantasy romance. Let’s review!

 

Feyre and Rhysand are one of those couples built brick-by-brick. Each story adds another layer to their breathtaking relationship. While nothing will ever compare to the flawless second book of the series, this final book in the trilogy does wrap up their story nicely. Their journey is epic and it concludes in epic fashion!

 

The world expands exponentially, bringing in new characters, agendas, and settings. Most of these new element are great, particularly the focus on the other courts. Secondary characters from the first novel appear in this last book, answering some lingering questions. The one aspect of the novel I disliked was, unfortunately, a hold over from previous novels – Feyre’s family. I’m not a fan of how Feyre’s sisters and father treated her in previous novels. I never understood their motives; therefor their treatment of Feyre just seemed thoughtless and cruel. Perhaps future books will explore them more in depth in an approachable way.

 

tl;dr Although not nearly as bewitching as the second book, it is a satisfying conclusion to Feyre and Rhysand’s story.

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