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review 2017-05-24 04:43
Every time
One Night with Rhodes (One Night Series Book 4) - Eden Finley,Book Covers by Design,Kelly Hartigan

This book is #4 in the One Night series.  This book can be read as a standalone novel.  To avoid spoilers and understand the series, I recommend reading series in order.

 

Blair tells his friends he is attracted to both sexes.  They really have nothing to say.  He figures that means they do not approve.  He cannot help the way he feels for his best friends older brother.  Since that is just a dream, he keeps looking for the "one."

 

Garrett does not want to be attracted to men.  It is becoming increasingly difficult to hide that he is.  He has always had a playboy reputation with women.  What he wants is a real relationship that he does not have to hide.

 

Theirs is a complicated relationship.  I love the banter, the heat, the laughter, and more.  This series is so much fun since it is about a group of friends.  There is something for everyone.  I hope to see more of these characters.  I give this book a 4/5 Kitty's Paws UP!

 

 

***This ARC copy was given in exchange for an honest review, by Netgalley and its publisher.

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review 2017-03-26 20:38
Vehn (Exotic Ink Series Book 1) by L.S. Anders
Vehn - Exotic Ink Series: Book One - LS Anders,Paradox Book Covers Formatting,Ella Medler,Elfwerks Editing

OMGOSH! This turned out to be a great read.

So I had a hard time in the beginning & leading up towards the middle, with our heroine. I understood her misgivings/fears, I did. I just felt like certain occurrences should have jolted her out of her way of thinking a lot sooner. Then what she did or how she handled the big eff up 75% in the novel, I was soooo ticked at her. I mean I totally saw myself leaping into my kindle, into her living room and shaking the ever loving crap out of her & letting Vehn in her house, so he could explain himself. LOL!

This was a very sexy, sweet, emotionally driven read. I loved/liked all the main supporting cast here. Hints to some of their individual stories, seem intriguing. Got my nosy behind dying to know what the deal is.... Sorry but I laughed so hard when it was finally revealed how Brent died.
photo 423306_zpsue9q6fr5.gif

I REALLY love Tegan To be quite honest, I was crushing on him way more than I was Vehn *Whispers* Sorry Vehn.

I think/hope given where Rayna & Tegan's story start here in this book, that their book will be off the chain interesting, intense, and beautiful. #CannotWaitForTheirStory.

Oh and Regina,
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This was a great intro to this series. I highly recommend that you read it.

Happy Reading :)

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review 2017-02-05 23:05
Book Review of The Soul Catcher by Rowanne Carberry
The Soul Catcher - http://best-book-covers.com/,Rowanne S Carberry

Spirit-speaker. Death Seer.

 

To preserve her sanity, Jemma lives her lie—that she is normal. As a child, her psychic gifts cost her everything. So when she foresees a woman's murder, she does nothing to prevent it and unwittingly helps a serial killer get away with another murder.
Guilt-ridden, she reports the crime only to find herself thrown into a world she didn’t know existed. Coerced into working with the police, battling to keep herself alive and dealing with newfound emotions, Jemma is forced to use the gifts she sees as a curse, to save the lives of others.

 

Review 4*

 

This is an intriguing supernatural horror story. I really enjoyed it.

 

Jemma is a wonderful character. I liked her a lot. She pretends that she is a normal woman, but she is not. She can see ghosts and interact with them. When a stranger bumps into her, triggering her psychic gift, she warns the woman of danger. Unfortunately, the woman doesn't take any notice and is found dead. Unable to live with herself after the event, she goes to the police to report her vision. What she didn't expect was to be thrown into an emotional nightmare.

 

I received a complimentary copy of this book from the author with no expectation of a positive review; this is my honest opinion. I started to read this book and was quickly hooked. Jemma's vision of the woman's murder is shocking and incredibly chilling. I found myself sitting on the edge of my seat as the story unfolded. I was intrigued with the supernatural task force that works with the police and liked meeting some of the team members, such as Ripper and Aidan, who each have special gifts of their own. However, I am not overly fond of Detective Mitchell, the team leader. He is incredibly driven and, although I am not sure what his problem is, comes across as a sadistic b*stard and not an entirely likable person. He puts Jemma through hell in an effort to find the serial killer and basically kidnaps her and holds her prisoner until she complies with his demands. This is not the best way to recruit members in my opinion.

 

The story takes the reader on a journey of horror as the team gets ever closer to the serial killer. He's a soul eating demon and is growing in strength with every soul he eats. However, there is also a touch of romance between Jemma and Ripper. There are no scenes of a sexual nature (apart from kissing) between them though, as there never seems to be enough time for anything more. I found myself on a roller coaster of emotions throughout this book, from disgust at Detective Mitchell's behaviour to sadness at the brutal murders of the innocents by the killer. There's a huge fight scene between the team and the demon, and a surprising twist I didn't see coming towards the end. Although the book doesn't end in a cliffhanger, the author has written it in such a way that it is obvious there will be another book to follow.

 

Rowanne Carberry has written an intriguing supernatural horror story. This is her debut novel. I love her fast paced writing style, which kept me turning the pages. Her descriptive prose brought the story to grizzly life and it flowed wonderfully from start to finish. My only complaint is that I felt that some of the characters needed a little more development, though this could be easily rectified as the series progresses. I would definitely consider reading more of her books in the future.

 

Due to scenes of graphic violence and gore and some profane language, I do not recommend this book to younger readers or persons of a nervous disposition. However, I highly recommend this book if you love supernatural or paranormal horror/urban fantasy genres. - Lynn Worton

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review 2016-10-09 16:38
The course of true love never did run smooth
The Lady Anne (Above all Others; The Lady Anne Book 2) - Ammonia Book Covers,Brooke Aldrich,Lawrence G. Lovasik

I write this review as one of the members of behalf of Rosie’s Books Review Team. I was provided with a free copy of the book as part of the team.

I have read and enjoyed La Petite Boulain, the first book in the Above all Others series and really enjoyed getting to know a bit more about Anne Boleyn’s childhood, and particularly, the way the story was told, in the first person from the point of view of young Anne, or, to be more precise, the young Anne as remembered by the older Anne at the moment of awaiting her death in the Tower.

Here we see Anne return to England after spending part of her childhood and teenage years in courts abroad. She is sad to leave France, as she feels by now more French than English, and the weather and the difficulties of her trip don’t help make her feel at home. Luckily, things take a turn for the better quickly. She meets Thomas Wyatt, a neighbour, accomplished poet, and a childhood friend, and once she joins the court, becoming one of Queen Katherine’s ladies in waiting, she soon meets interesting people, makes new friends, rekindles old friendships, and becomes a fashion icon and very admired for her style, accomplishments, and her personality.

I was curious to see how this novel would portray Anne as a young woman, in an era more familiar to most people than that of her early years. She is presented as an interesting mixture of a clever and intelligent woman, with far wider knowledge and experiences than many of the women her age she meets, but still a young girl at heart, who loves the idea of courting, handsome and romantic knights, and has to admit to being proud of the way men are attracted to her and women copy her dresses and jewels. She changes her mind often and she thinks she is in love with Tom Wyatt one day, although it’s an impossible love, but then decides it’s only friendship. She falls in love with Henry Percy (of much higher standing than her as he’s due to become the Earl of Northumberland) and with her father’s approval pursues a marriage that would have been very advantageous for her family, but when Cardinal Wolsey and Henry’s father forbid the match, her disappointment makes her hate him. And then, there’s King Henry…

I must confess that I enjoyed the discussions about Anne’s ideas and her education in religion and philosophy in the first book, and there were only passing references to it here (partly because she worried about the company she keeps and how they would react if they were aware of her opinions, and partly because there are other things that occupy more of her time), and there is much more about romance and romantic ideas. King Henry seems to notice her following an accident (although perhaps before that) and her behaviour and her refusal to become his mistress seem to spur him on rather than make him forget her and move on. If Henry Percy gave up on her without a fight, this is a man who would risk everything (even the future of his kingdom) for his own enjoyment and to prove himself, and in Anne, he meets a challenge. Not being a big reader of romance, the pull and push of the relationship and the will she/won’t she (especially knowing how things will turn up) part of it was not what interested me the most, although the scenes are well done and I found the fights and disagreements between the couple enjoyable. I became intrigued by King Henry’s portrayal, not so much by what he does and says, but by how others see him. There is a very apt warning her brother George gives her, recalling how King Henry was walking with his arm around a nobleman’s shoulders one afternoon and two days later the said nobleman’s head was topping a pole on the King’s orders.

I was more interested in matters of politics and alliances (confusing as they were), the inner workings of the court, marriages and births, and Anne’s reflections about the roles of women and men in the society of the time, that she struggles against but ultimately feels obliged to follow. I was also intrigued by the depiction of her family, her brother George, always close to her, her sister Mary, who although Anne always saw as too free and easy, she comes to understand and appreciate (and who manages to achieve a happy existence in her own terms, eventually), her mother, who suffers from a strange illness, and her father, who appears to be only interested in the family’s advancement (although claims that it is not for himself, but for those who’ll come after). He seemingly has no respect for morality if it can get in the way of achieving his goals, and at times he treats his daughters as pawns or worse. In the novel, Anne is portrayed as having much of the initiative, at least at the beginning, regarding her relationship with King Henry, but I was very intrigued by the role her uncle, the Duke of Norfolk, would come to play, and how much he influenced later events and the rise of Anne to become Queen.

This volume made me wonder, more than the first one, how reliable a narrator is Anne supposed to be. She makes a very interesting comment about wearing masks and the fact that we all perform our roles in public, whatever our feelings or thoughts might really be. After all, this is Anne remembering her life and trying to distract herself from her likely dark fate. Sometimes she does protest too much, when talking about her accomplishments, intelligence and fashion sense, and insists that she does not believe in false modesty. She also talks about Tom Wyatt’s affections and how she had not encouraged him, but she evidently enjoys his attentions. At other times, she describes events and scenes as if she were at the same time protagonist and observer (from telling us what she was feeling and her concerns, she will go on to describe what she looked like or what she was wearing). She does highlight the behaviours she thinks show her in a good light and easily finds ways in which to dismiss some of her more selfish or problematic behaviours, but at a time such as the one she’s living through, after having lost everything and everybody, it’s only understandable. If anything, it shows her as a complex and contradictory individual and makes her appear more real.

The writing is once more fluid and beautifully detailed, bringing to life places, customs and times long past.

Although I know what will happen next, I’m intrigued to read Anne’s version of events and look forward to the next book. I highly recommend this series to anybody interested in Anne Boleyn who enjoys historical fiction, and to anybody who is considering reading about such a fascinating historical figure.

 

 

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text 2016-09-03 03:37
Chanur's Venture lol

I was working on adding a little of my haul to LibraryThing when I noticed some of the other covers for Chanur's Venture. Here's what my copy looks like:

 

 

This works for me as a representation of Chanur, based on what I remember of the first book. I recall Tully having difficulty believing that Chanur and her whole crew were female, and Chanur and her crew saw Tully's beard as a scraggly mane.

 

Here are the covers that made me lol:

 

 

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