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text 2018-03-23 17:02
Reading progress update: I've read 384 out of 384 pages.
My Husband's Wife: A Novel - Jane Corry

This book was such a muddle. Too much was happening and I didn't care for either of the characters we followed (Lilly and Carla). It made me think a bit about "The Girl Before" where the two women find themselves drawn to a man that has not a good choice written all over him. 


The development of the characters was thin. The plot was not great. The writing was just okay and the flow was hampered by jumping between two characters and then the timelines jumping ahead. 

Not a one star read, but probably more towards a two star read. Review to follow. 

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review 2018-03-23 16:13
Aunt Bessie Observes
Aunt Bessie Observes - Diana Xarissa

Janet and Joan Markham were first seen in a previous Aunt Bessie book and now have a series of no-murder cozy mysteries, and I enjoyed watching them team up with Bessie. In the Markham Sisters mystery The Jackson Case, a pair of con-men swindled a charity out of its proceeds from a charity auction. and in Aunt Bessie Observes, both found murdered. I'm not really sure what Bessie observed, other than the horrifically garish theme cottage that neighbor Maggie fixed up (which made me laugh out loud!) but this was still an entertaining and enjoyable read with a fascinating cross-over mystery.

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text 2018-03-23 13:52
Reading progress update: I've read 90 out of 341 pages.
The Woman in Cabin 10 - Helen Ruth Elizabeth Ware



what was that splash? did someone fall off the boat? did someone jump off the boat? was someone pushed off the boat? was...someone dumped off the boat?


besides that: Lo drinks too much, and Ben is a jerk.

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text 2018-03-23 11:59
Reading progress update: I've read 135 out of 384 pages.
My Husband's Wife: A Novel - Jane Corry

Going to work on this today so I can take it back to the library tomorrow.

We now have a reveal about Lily's husband that makes me wonder why he did marry her. They both appear to be miserable and she's still obsessing about the possible murderer in jail. 

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review 2018-03-23 09:55
The Highlander's Touch by Karen Marie Moning
The Highlander's Touch - Karen Marie Moning

In 1308 Circenn Brodie, the immortal laird of Brodie, swears an oath to kill whomever comes along with a hallowed Fae flask that's been recently stolen and put a binging spell on.

In present day Cincinnati, Lisa Stone is working two jobs to pay the medical bills for her deathly ill mother. One of those jobs include night cleaning at the museum...Then one morning, curiosity makes her touch a shimmering flask in a recently unearthed chest brought to the US from the Scottish Highlands...and she finds herself flung 700 years back, to 1314 and castle Dunnottar, smack in the middle of Circenn Brodie's chambers.

Yet the man who swore the oath to kill her, the man who lived his life with honor, cannot bring himself to do what he'd sworn to do. And the woman who, in the past five years, had seldom experienced tenderness, care and comfort finds herself falling for the towering warrior.

But there are obligations waiting for her back in the future, and even though Circenn claims he cannot return her, Lisa is adamant in finding a way out of her predicament and back to her mother's side...Even if it means breaking two hearts in the process.

This was the first Karen Marie Moning book I ever bought, it introduced me to the author and to this series. And yes, it's probably my favorite of them all. You know, you never forget your first one.

But what's not to like about this story, really?
It's set in Scottish Highlands (my favorite setting of them all; I've actually visited both castles mentioned in this story—Dunnottar and Brodie!), it features, albeit briefly, the battle at Bannock Burn (providing one of the best quotes in this book*), it's filled with wonderful supporting cast (the Douglas Brothers, the surprise appearance of Robert the Bruce in all his matchmaking glory...), and has one hell of a leading man.

Circenn Brodie, the ninth-century warrior living in the fourteenth-century war-torn Scotland, falling in love with a twenty-first century woman. And the man was barely ruffled, except when it came to the woman, of course, as it should be.
Granted, I'm not really sure why he fell in love with her, she (at least not that I could see) had any special characteristics, except for being "alien" and having a mind of her own. Yes, she's suffered, she had issues, but that was pretty much it. Not much was spent on her character at least not in the way for Circenn to fall for her the way he did.
While many pages were spent on Circenn and all his good qualities (did he even have any bad ones), making him known to the reader so that she/he would understand, empathize and sympathize with Lisa's plight as she stumbled over the proverbial cliff.

And then there was Adam Black whose real identity, as it was revealed, comes as a huge surprise for those who read this book for the first time. I'm glad he's starting to redeem himself after the "mischief" he concocted in the first book (where he was quite a villain) and we're slowly working toward his own story.

This book was a fast-paced, intriguing mix of historical romance and time-travel with a gripping, yet minor, suspense and treason sub-plot, the romance was lovely and heartfelt, the narration was wonderfully evocative, painting vivid pictures of the characters and their surroundings...All nicely intertwined with magical elements and the beauty of Scotland.


Along the Bannock Burn, Circenn Brodie was an animal, merciless and swift. Later the men would claim he vied with the Berserkers in his deadly rage, and epics would be composed in his honor. He was cold and sharp and hard, and good for nothing but slaughter. He lost himself in a blackness so complete that he cared naught if he slew legions, he simply raged, hoping to exhaust himself and gain the respite of unconsciousness, a temporary kind of death.
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