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review 2019-03-10 23:08
Je t'aime
A Year in Paris: Season by Season in the City of Light - John Baxter

Non-fiction book for Feb 2019 My Book Box.

If anyone writes more beautifully about Paris than John Baxter, I’ve yet to read them.
This book is supposedly about Paris throughout the year. It loosely follows this (there are some jumps in season, time, and place) as well as a brief history of the Revolution’s desire to change the calenderer.

It is best to think of this book as part memoir of seasons of his life in Paris, as well as seasons of Paris. Each chapter is like a meditation.

There are interesting little factoids that pop up. Like France’s obsession with sanitation. Or how names use to be chosen for French children. There is a wonderful bit about April, Paris, and music. There are observations like, “More so in France than anywhere else in the world, political survival turns on a gesture” (207).

There are parts of the book that are somewhat, well strange. It’s not the comparison between Baxter’s Australia or California. Those parts are interesting. It’s just sometimes, it almost feels like he is oversharing. There is a bit too much about his sexual relationships. Don’t get me wrong, the details aren’t overly graphic, and the first relationship is actually beautifully described. However, he does seem to think of Paris, in part, as terms of women he has relationships with. (Most importantly, it should be fairly noted, his wife and daughter. He dedicates the book to both, and they do seem to be the loves of his life. The two non-marriage relationships occur prior to the marriage). So, we also get details about his relationship with a German woman. There also is a weird bit about an Aussie’s man’s junk. Which comes out of left field. I’m not really sure why that was there.

Still, it is a beautiful book about Paris. You should read it.

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text 2019-03-01 11:34
March Wishful Reading List
How Dare the Sun Rise: Memoirs of a War Child - Abigail Pesta,Sandra Uwiringiyimana
Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl - Carrie Brownstein
Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body - Roxane Gay
Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage - Edith B. Gelles
The Colour Bar: The Triumph of Seretse Kama and His Nation - Susan Williams
Love, Loss, and What We Ate: A Memoir - Padma Lakshmi
The Fever: How Malaria Has Ruled Humankind for 500,000 Years - Sonia Shah
Playing with Fire: The 1968 Election and the Transformation of American Politics - Lawrence O'Donnell
1968: The Year That Rocked the World - Mark Kurlansky
Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture - Roxane Gay

So here is what I am reading, or hope to read, this month.

 

1. How Dare the Sun Rise: Memoirs of a War Child by Sandra Uwiringiyimana with Abigail Pesta

 

2. Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl: A Memoir by Carrie Brownstein

 

3. Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay

 

4. Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage by Edith B. Gelles 

 

5. The Colour Bar: The Triumph of Seretse Khama and His Nation by Susan Williams

 

6. Love, Loss, and What We Ate: A Memoir by Padma Lakshmi

 

7. The Fever: How Malaria Has Ruled Humankind for 500,000 Years by Sonia Shah

 

8. Playing with Fire: The 1968 Election and the Transformation of American Politics by Lawrence O'Donnell 

 

9. 1968: The Year that Rocked the World by Mark Kurlansky

 

10. Shelter in Place by Nora Roberts

 

11. Connections in Death by JD Roberts

 

12. Not That Bad: Dispatches from the Rape Culture by Roxane Gay

 

 

 

Also, happy National Crafting Month to my fellow crafters. I am using this month to tackle the every growing pile of cross stitch kits I have (similar to my TBR).

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review 2019-02-18 21:01
Timepiece
Timepiece - Heather Albano


I read time travel, so count me in. There's an introduction in the book about the special setting where, from our POV, people from one historical setting visit another one. Besides it is set in an alternative steampunk London where monsters and the machines that were meant to keep them in check roam around.

This is a good example of how thing gradually became worse, with the solution being even worse than the problem and this for several problems. Luckily there is a bunch of time traveling pocket watches available and some young people who are willing to use it to rid the world once and for all of these problems. Our main characters are from Georgian England and it is clear that HG Wells and the like have not yet been around, because of course they should have realized right from the start that History doesn't want to be changed and that these things NEVER end well.

The story was a bit slower than I expected. While they do jump around in time quite some, I was perhaps still used to the mayhem that is St Mary's in that other Time Travel series that I'm reading. I'm however, not entirely on board with the rules of the time travel in this one, especially since they glance over (or at least give a unsatisfactory answer) to two of the most important paradoxes of time travel. I hope this will be resolved a bit better in the next book, which I hope to read soon.

Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

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text 2019-02-18 07:50
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text 2019-02-01 11:29
February 2019 TBR
Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage - Edith B. Gelles
The Colour Bar: The Triumph of Seretse Kama and His Nation - Susan Williams
The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars - Nathalia Holt
1968: The Year That Rocked the World - Mark Kurlansky
Radio Girls - Sarah-Jane Stratford
Somewhere in France: A Novel of the Great War - Jennifer Robson
Master of Love - Catherine LaRoche
The Trouble with Valentine's Day - Rachel Gibson,Kathleen Early,Blackstone Audio
Maisie Dobbs - Jacqueline Winspear

 Image result for snoopy february

 

From my physical non-fiction shelf -  Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage by Edith B. Gelles and Colour Bar: The Triumph of Seretse Khama and his Nation by Susan Williams.

 

From my science reading list - The Genius of Birds by Jennifer Ackerman and Rise of the Rocket Girls by Natalia Holt. 

 

From my Nixon reading list - 1968: The Year That Rocked the World by Mark Kurlansky.

 

From my Winter COYER reading list - Radio Girls by Sarah Jane Stratford, Somewhere in France by Jennifer Robson, and Master of Love by Catherine LaRoche.

 

From my physical fiction shelf - The Trouble with Valentine's Day by Rachel Gibson.

 

Library pick - Maisie Dobbs by Jaqueline Winspear.

 

Finally, I am doing an experiment. Every Friday, I am going to read a short book from either my NOOK or Kindle. I am using Random Number Generator to pick from a list. I will announce these picks on my Friday reads. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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