Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: not-books
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-03-22 12:59
Curve Couture - irwing Curve Couture - irwing
Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-03-22 01:19
Seriously... I'm Kidding by Ellen DeGeneres
Seriously... I'm Kidding - Ellen DeGeneres

Seriously… I’m Kidding has been on my to-read list for a while now. When it finally came available to borrow from my library I jumped at the chance to listen to the audio version.


Narrated by Ellen herself, this audio book was just like listening to the opening monologue on her talk show. I enjoyed her observations on the world around her and admire her for keeping her jokes clean. Unlike most comedians, Ellen’s humor is suitable for all ages.


Although an enjoyable listen, I did find some of the rambling to be a bit much and settled on a 3 star rating. I would recommend Seriously… I’m Kidding to fans of Ellen DeGeneres.

Source: mlsredhousereviews.wordpress.com/2018/03/08/seriously-im-kidding-by-ellen-degeneres
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-21 19:32
The Accusation by Bandi
The Accusation: Forbidden Stories from Inside North Korea - Deborah Smith,Bandi

This is a collection of short stories criticizing the North Korean government. Purportedly, it was written by an anonymous North Korean official still living in the country, and smuggled out as a handwritten manuscript. Upon reading the first couple of stories, though, I began to wonder if that backstory is a publicity stunt. I’ve read a lot of contemporary English-language fiction, and a lot of fiction from countries around the world, and what struck me about this collection is that it is written in a style characteristic of modern English-speaking authors. This makes it easy reading for those audiences: it’s written with the immediacy and emotional intimacy with the characters that one typically sees in English-language fiction; it has that pleasing balance of dialogue and narrative, that easy-to-read plot-driven flow, that immersion in the characters’ thoughts and feelings that characterizes most popular fiction today. Authors from cultural traditions very different from the mainstream western ones rarely write this way unless they have immigrated to an English-speaking country, even though almost all of them would have ready access to popular fiction, unlike someone living in North Korea.

Having these doubts, I poked around on the Internet for more information about the book (the New Yorker article is worth a read). No one has proven it to be a hoax, and a vocabulary analysis apparently indicates that the writer used North Korean language, which has diverged somewhat from South Korea’s over the decades of separation. However, I found it significant that journalist Barbara Demick, author of the fantastic Nothing to Envy (a nonfiction narrative of life in North Korea, based on her research and defectors’ accounts) also doubts the official version. Her doubt seems to stem primarily from the author’s keen awareness of the regime’s internal contradictions; this is apparently an understanding that takes defectors significant time outside the country to fully comprehend.

As for the book itself, each of its seven stories is a quick and easy read, though they average around 30 pages each. However, after the first two or three stories, which were fairly enjoyable, I began to tire of their incessant drumbeat. All of the stories are about how the regime and life in North Korea crushes a character in one way or another (usually metaphorically, but in one case physically): there is no conflict that doesn’t have the Party at its base and no possibility of happiness. At the end of the final story, a character, gazing at the red-brick local Party office, reflects, “How many noble lives had been lost to its poison! The root of all human misfortunate and suffering was that red European specter that the [party official] had boasted had put down roots in this land, the seed of that red mushroom!” Perhaps I ought to take the idea that the government could be the cause of all human suffering as evidence that the author does in fact live in North Korea, but in any case, such a simplistic view of the world doesn’t make for high-quality literary work.

Whoever the author may be, the fundamental storytelling skills are certainly there, despite a singular political focus, and it will be an especially interesting book for those who haven’t read much about North Korea. But for those who want to learn more about the country, I recommend starting with the brilliant Nothing to Envy.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-21 04:15
Review: A Day In The Life Of Marlon Bundo
A Day In The Life Of Marlon Bundo - Jill Twiss,Marlon Bundo,Jim Parsons

Had to purchase he audiobook to tide me over until the physical books are back in stock.


As the bisexual mother of lesbian and pansexual daughters, and the sister-in-law of two lovely lesbians with three beautiful daughters, this was the best book I've read/listened to. As a human person who believes in tolerance, equality and that love is love, this is the best book I've read/listened to!

The narrators were perfect, as was the story. There was so much importance in how the animals all stood behind the bunnies who only wanted to love one another. And the best moment was when they all realized that they got to decide who their leader was, and voted the mean old stink bug out! Love and tolerance won in the end.

This book gives me hope that this will soon be the case in real life.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-20 21:24
The Invisible Library...
The Invisible Library - Genevieve Cogman

If anyone is familiar with the Bookburners serial then you know that it's remarkably similar to The Invisible Library series. I really like the Bookburners serial so I was excited to come across something else comparable.


I enjoyed The Invisible Library too and really can't believe I waited so long to read it, but one thing I thought could have been better was the world building. It just wasn't as defined as I would have liked it, and I'm referring more so to the Chaos concept, the alternate realities, the Library Language even some of the characters and their abilities were underdeveloped.


I realize it's a pretty complex system but there were a couple of times I wondered if the author even knew where she was trying to go with it.  Maybe those loose ends are tied up in the next book but, I personally like for the foundation to be laid out and nicely detailed, right from the start. It drives me nuts when authors use future installments to fill in gaps and missing pieces.


I am intrigued by the Library though and I really like Kai, Irene and Vale so I'm definitely going to continue the series with hopes that the many underlying layers of the Library develop into something a little more cohesive.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?