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text 2018-02-06 18:52
M.C. Frank's Couples Giveaway!

Its February and that means its the time for love and couples and GIVEAWAYS! Do you want to win $15 to the Book Depository? Of course you do! Read below about how to enter! 

 

 

This giveaway is hosted by the amazing couples from M.C. Frank's books: Ari and Wes from Lose Me (see above), Astra and Felix from No Ordinary Star and Beatrice and Dominic from Ruined

 

TO ENTER THE GIVEAWAY CLICK HERE

 

Want to know who these couples are? Read some of my review of Lose Me below! 

 

 

...Ari is a stunt double in a new adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, which is actually pretty dang cool. Ladies, you don't have to be the leading actress. You can kick-ass by jumping off cliffs and driving cars around sick bends. Ari is an enigma the moment you meet her repeating “today is not the day I die” over and over again. Something’s amiss, obvious by the gentle cues from the writings, but you don't know what it is.

Wes is the leading man in the movie, literally the Darcy. And he’s just as you would picture as described by Ari before she meets him. But Wes isn't just a two-dimensional characters, smiling at the camera. He has feelings and demons that will haunt him throughout the novel....

 

Click here to continue reading my review! 

 

Aaaand that's it! Good luck everyone! 

 

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review 2018-02-05 02:13
Good Story
A Devil in Scotland: A No Ordinary Hero Novel - Suzanne Enoch

After he finds out his too responsible older brother is marrying their childhood friend, Callum flies off in a drunken fit of rage and is banished. Ten years later, he finds himself back in Scotland to find out what happened to his brother.

This story had a pretty good plot and some interesting characters. My only real issue is that I’m not the biggest Callum fan. He’s pretty rash and impulsive, which got on my nerves. Overall it didn’t really deter from the book though. I recommend.

**I voluntarily read and reviewed this book

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url 2018-01-30 19:22
69 new today in book series
Dark in Death - J.D. Robb
Still Me: A Novel - Jojo Moyes
Beyond Danger - Kat Martin
The Invisible Planet - Geronimo Stilton
Judgment Road - Christine Feehan
Stormspeaker - Christina Diaz Gonzalez
Alpha's Mate - Eve Langlais
Moonlight Sins - Jennifer L. Armentrout
Zero Hour (Wired & Dangerous) - Megan Erickson
A Devil in Scotland: A No Ordinary Hero Novel - Suzanne Enoch

For complete list, checkout FictFact.com's Book Release Calendar.  (If link doesn't work or you lose this post, it's under the "Explore" menu.) 

Source: www.fictfact.com/BookReleaseCalendar
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review 2018-01-20 17:45
A Devil in Scotland: A No Ordinary Hero Novel - Suzanne Enoch This one was so full of adventure and plot. The characters had such a back story and obstacles ahead of them that I was 80% done with the book and thinking there was no way I was more than 50% done. It could have gone on for so much more, but loved every second of it. It was entertaining, complex, passionate, and downright good. Callum had a lot of resentment to overcome before he could trust Becca again. Ten years is a long time to hold a grudge and think the worst of someone. She has buried a husband and a father and is looking to marry a man she has been friends with for ten years through his partnership with her late husband. What she doesn’t expect, or want, is Callum, her brother in law, to storm back into her life and accuse her of having something to do with his brother’s death and spouting notions of vengeance against a man who has been nothing but kind to her during the past 14 months. He is so sure of his suspicions and she can’t help remember a time when they had been friends, though he broke her heart 10 years ago, that he draws her back in, in spite of herself. They didn’t come together ten years ago but now as they hunt for proof of murder conspiracies they can’t help but finally see in each other their other half. Their story was great, loved it and will have to go back and read book 1 and 2.
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review 2018-01-15 19:36
A Moonless, Starless Sky by Alexis Okeowo
A Moonless, Starless Sky: Ordinary Women and Men Fighting Extremism in Africa - Alexis Okeowo

This is a short nonfiction work by a Nigerian-American journalist that goes behind the headlines in four conflict areas in Africa, telling the stories of people who range from victims to local leaders. It is a very engaging book, a quick read that introduces readers to several countries and humanizes big events, although at only 236 pages for so many stories, it is very brief and therefore unable to treat its subjects with the depth I would have liked.

Eunice is a teenage girl living in rural northern Uganda when she is kidnapped by Kony’s Lord’s Resistance Army while visiting her sister at boarding school. Once in the bush, she is forced to marry Bosco, a young man also kidnapped as a teenager, and both are forced to participate in acts of violence. By the time both eventually escape, they have children together, and Eunice, like many young women whose futures are circumscribed by LRA kidnapping, decides to return to Bosco. Former rebels are given amnesty to encourage defection, but the couple faces ostracism from their community and seems to be passing on their trauma to their children.

Biram is a Mauritanian activist, growing up in a socially conscious family in the last country in the world to outlaw slavery (it became illegal in 1981, but not a criminal offense until 2007), and one where the police remain uninterested in bringing wealthy slaveowners to justice. He starts an organization dedicated to eradicating slavery, rescues slaves directly and draws attention to the cause by risky acts like publicly burning the books used to justify slavery under Muslim law (though he is Muslim himself). Later he expands his focus to other racial justice issues and runs for president of Mauritania.

Abba, aka Elder, is an auditor and patriarch of a large family in northern Nigeria when Boko Haram gains traction in the area. Frustrated by the lack of government response to the attacks, he joins a local vigilante group that captures militants and hands them over to security forces, proving far more effective than the actual military. He becomes a leader in the group and moves into politics as well. Meanwhile, Rebecca is a teenage boarding school student in nearby Chibok when she is kidnapped by Boko Haram along with 300 classmates. Fortunately, she is one of the 50-odd with the courage and presence of mind to quickly escape, and gradually overcomes her trauma while returning to school in a distant city.

Finally, Aisha is a teenage girl in Mogadishu, Somalia, who refuses to let al-Shabaab terrorists intimidate her out of playing basketball. They certainly try – she receives regular death threats by phone, is nearly kidnapped and has a gun pointed at her on a bus – and another female player is brutally murdered. But Aisha is determined to live her own life, and she and her teammates find joy in the game and treasure rare opportunities to participate in tournaments, despite the lack of government support.

These are all fascinating stories, though the subtitle doesn’t quite fit anyone other than perhaps Aisha: Biram and Elder are leaders, not ordinary people, while Rebecca is a survivor but not exactly fighting extremism, and Eunice and Bosco remain victims. Each story is told in two chapters, one in the first half of the book and the other in the second, and the second half provides much of the emotional consequences and complexity that seemed to be missing from the first half. Of course the circumstances of these people’s lives, and the strength required to keep going, is extraordinary to the Western reader. This book tells very compelling stories in a quick and accessible way; for me it is too quick (each of these stories deserves its own book), but it provides a great introduction while telling human stories behind events in the headlines.

My other reservation is the fact that the book cites no sources, and the author tells us nothing about her research other than what happens to come out in the text as she relates her experiences in meeting these folks. She generally applies critical thought to the stories people tell her – for instance, she includes the accusations of brutality against Elder’s group – but sometimes seems to accept simplistic stories, as in the 9-page life story of a Mauritanian slave that seems to be a chronicle of constant abuse. Though the author seems to do her research, it’s never clear how well the stories are corroborated.

Despite that, I think this is a great premise for a book and these stories are engaging, emotional, and well-told, with enough background information included for readers unfamiliar with these countries to understand their contexts. I recommend it.

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