logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: out-of-print
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-22 15:47
Love, Second Time Around: Large Print Edition (Summerfield Sweet Romance) (Volume 1) - Penny Appleton

Love, Second Time Around by Penny Appleton
Story starts out wth Maggie and she's heading to the seminar in Edinburgh. Through many sources of travel she does arrive, in time and sees her old friend Greg. They had often been on opposite sides of the table, both are fighting for their side to win-environmental oil issues.
She put a lot of work into her research and is a bit thrown off by finding him there. They do connect but she keeps her distance.
When they meet up later and spend the night at the same hotel after a conceert they draw closer. She needs the money to fix up her square cottage.
Love parts of the land and surrounding areas that are described. Love also the US locations as I've been through many. Love learning about the new places to explore.
Lvoe hearing about the horses and the places they are able to get to. When they meet for another meeting in the city her boss finds out she's spent time with Greg and she's fired. He does find out and I like hearing what he did about it. He has the solution if she will agree.
Love hearing of the native Indian customs and tradiitions. Love the escusions. You wonder if they will ever get to connect again. Love chats they had about their past lives and kids as they create new memories.
Can't wait to read more from this author. Wish some parts she had spent more time on with more details because I really like to learn new things.
Beautiful story! Love that it's about older people, not those in their 20's because the problems are different. This book has something for everybody to enjoy.
Received this review copy from the author and this is my honest opinion.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-11 22:24
The Outlander (Adamson)
The Outlander (Large Print 16pt) - Gil Adamson

Honestly, I can't imagine what Anansi Press was thinking, letting this first novel go out into the world with a title so similar to that of a pop-culture phenomenon. Otherwise, though, they have done well by Gil Adamson in both production and editing, and I'm very glad they published this interesting story.

 

Adamson deliberately distances us a bit from her characters. They are "the Reverend", "the Ridge Runner", the "Widow." The significance of "the widow" as the constant name for the protagonist -we don't get her real name until well into the book - is that it keeps at the top of our minds exactly what is always at the top of hers - that she has murdered her husband. And that same distancing relieves us of the responsibility of empathizing with her more than we want to, though you'd have to have a pretty black soul not to feel something by the end of her picaresque adventures through the Crows Nest Pass area in western Canada. The landscape is very definitely a character, and a cruel one, in this novel. It has its spectacularly climactic plot event in the Frank slide (a notorious 1903 landslide that wiped out a sizeable part of a mining town). I thoroughly enjoyed how well Adamson described it and wove it in to her story from several points of view.

 

The widow - Mary Boulton - is supported by a well-described set of supporting characters, one of whom, the reclusive Ridge Runner, becomes a romantic interest though not, thank goodness, in a conventionally sappy way that would have ruined everything we have come to know about both characters. I thought the inclusion of the Native characters was sufficiently nuanced and well-managed to meet the political correctness standards of our time, though Henry is a relatively minor character.

 

At the beginning of this novel, Mary is highly vulnerable, fumbling her way to survival and sometimes very nearly not making it. She is dependent on a series of saviours - an old lady (and her household), the Ridge Runner, Henry and his white wife Helen, and the Reverend Bonnycastle (working out his own demons of abuse in the rough mining town of Frank). But after she is finally caught by her slightly cartoonish Furies, a pair of red-headed giants (brothers of the ex-husband), Mary accomplishes her last escape from disaster without a saviour. This, I would say, is the principal emotional dynamic of the novel.

 

I did find this one a bit of a page-turner, and I would recommend it to anyone who likes period settings and interesting women's stories. I would warn off only those readers who have a strong need for emotional identification with a protagonist.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-07 22:26
Sea of Wind finished! First book of 2018
The Twelve Kingdoms: Sea of Wind - Fuyumi Ono,小野 不由美,Akihiro Yamada,山田 章博,Elye J. Alexander,Alexander O. Smith

I'm not going to write a full review for this, since I've already done that a couple times and don't have much new to say. Instead, here's this quick thing:

 

Just finished my most recent reread of this book. It's both one of my top favorite books in this series and one of my favorite books period. I consider it a comfort read, even though the "comfort" is a little muffled by the knowledge that the book's happy ending turns sour really quickly in the series' timeline. During this reread, I realized that I really connect with Taiki's feelings of self-doubt. I also found myself more angry at Gyoso than I was during past readings of this book.

Not long after admitting to the oracles that he was worried about Taiki's future since Taiki was so riddled with self-doubt and couldn't consciously access his tremendous power, he decided he'd give up his sagehood, leave Tai, and become a mercenary. He was too ashamed of the fact that he hadn't been declared the new king to stick around, even though he'd have been a great help to Taiki and his future king.

(spoiler show)

  Taiki had some serious weaknesses, but I'd argue that Gyoso did too, even though they weren't as obvious.

 

What my reading dates look like for this book so far:

 

 

Lol. I haven't checked, but I suspect that 2015 might have been the year I reread my hardcover copy rather than this one, my paperback copy, so it's pretty much been a reread a year for a while. (As usual with these Tokyopop editions, I highly recommend reading the paperback versions if you can, because there are fewer errors. If I remember right, this is the book where they accidentally used the wrong pronouns for one of the kirin.)

Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-12-07 06:11
Book Construction Blueprint - an essential reference book for self-published authors

Whenever I search the internet trying to find some information to resolve a self-publishing issue invariably an article written by Joel Friedlander comes up.

 

I've read a number of them and found them professional, helpful and, most importantly, understandable.

 

When I was offered all this knowledge free in his book Book Construction Blueprint by Joel Friedlander - Expert Advice for Creating Industry-Standard Print Books it was a no-brainer.

 

Book Construction Blueprint is a comprehensive guide and includes preparing your manuscript, interior book design, cover design, printing and working with professionals.

 

A good deal of it wasn't relevant for my needs but some was invaluable including the section Cleaning Up Your Word Files. Pretty much all the problems you're confronted with when you upload your original manuscript to a self-publishing platform can be attributed to formatting glitches in your Word file. Friedlander has some nifty tips, accompanied by screen shots, that saved me countless hours of hair-pulling frustration. They're now incorporated into my pre-upload check-list.

 

Ever wonder about the order of your book's front matter? What goes on the Copyright Page and does the Dedication Page come before Acknowledgements? It's all spelled out in Friedlander's book.

 

He also has some great suggestions on what components make an eye-catching cover, designing running heads and font choices.

 

I try to review a lot of new indie authors and it's very distracting and unprofessional to read poorly or incorrectly formatted books. I know what a challenge it is and mine still aren't perfect, but they'll be a lot better now that I have Book Construction Blueprint by Joel Friedlander - Expert Advice for Creating Industry-Standard Print Books to refer to.

 

I downloaded this book free from the BookBaby Blog

https://www.bookbaby.com/free-publishing-guides?utm_campaign=BB1748&utm_source=BBeNews&utm_medium=Email&spMailingID=55458812&spUserID=MjIyOTk1NTA0MTUzS0&spJobID=1285048504&spReportId=MTI4NTA0ODUwNAS2

 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?