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text 2017-09-02 08:10
Book Tour - Outsider
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NEW RELEASE...
On the western highlands of Scotland, a springtime storm pummels the coast while Kristie's brother is out fishing. When he fails to return home, Kristie turns away from her list of chores to search the loch in an effort to ease her pregnant sister-in-law's fears. Instead of finding Domnall, she discovers a naked and battered man washed up on shore and worries he could be a thieving reiver or worse--an Englishman.

When the handsome outsider wakes, he is unable to remember who he is or how he came to be there. Although the feisty and melancholy Kristie isn't keen on him remaining, her young neighbor, Jock, takes to the playful stranger and names Creag after the rocky crags where the loch meets the sea. Not long after the lad speaks of selkies, magical seals who shed their skins to live as humans, Creag dreams he is swimming deep beneath the waves.

Kristie is desperate to keep the farm running for her missing brother while Creag's sleep is filled with strange visions--glimpses that may reveal secrets to his past, but he may soon wish they were only a dream.

**CONTENT WARNING: Due to mature content, recommended for readers aged 18+**

TIME OF MYTHS 
Shapeshifter Sagas {Western European Myths from the Middle Ages}

Widow {13thc. | Black Shuck | England}
Scars {10thc. | Fenrir | Iceland}
Tides {10thc. | Kraken | Great Britain/Ireland}
Outsider {14thc. | Selkie | Scotland}

Available to buy from....
Amazon.com   Amazon.co.uk   Paperback

Also Available
Widow (Time of Myths: Shapeshifter Sagas Book 1)
Lady Rayne has few options as a young widow. Either her father will marry her off to a wealthy nobleman--no matter how old and disagreeable he may be, or she will become a nun like her aunt at Grimsford Abbey. The choice is easy: her interest in writing is not supported in the dark halls of her father's home. Rayne eagerly anticipates becoming a scribe and learning the art of illumination and book making. But first she must travel along the treacherous roads of East Anglia.

Far from the confines of Norwich, Rayne hears fables of an enormous ghostly hound called the Black Shuck. She tries to ignore them until she finds herself staring into its expressive brown eyes. With every heartbeat, her chances of reaching Grimsford Abbey disappear. If only she could live to tell the tale.

**CONTENT WARNING: Due to mature content, recommended for readers aged 18+**
 
 

Scars (Time of Myths: Shapeshifter Sagas Book 2)
Along the breathtaking and unforgiving coast of Snæland, Ásta’s ancestral farm is plagued with bad luck. The kinless maiden’s turf walls continue to be found damaged, and there aren’t enough farmhands to maintain the property. Claw marks in the dirt revive old memories of the wolf attack that left her scarred, and she begins to fear the whispers are true—that Fenrir, son of Loki and king of the wolves, has come to claim her and her land.

Torin often leaves his uncle’s farm in the southern hills to track and ensnare valuable gyrfalcons. His secret ability to turn into the birds he trains means his falconry skills are unparalleled, earning him precious silver and gold. If the ghosts of his past didn’t haunt him daily, pushing him to numb his senses with drink, Torin might have married by now—as his uncle often reminds him. He knows the time has finally come to find a wife and settle down.

During the Althing, the gathering of the year, Ásta’s ability to maintain her property comes into question while Torin wonders if a woman in jeopardy of losing her farm is really worth the trouble.

**CONTENT WARNING: Due to mature content, recommended for readers aged 18+**

Available to buy from....
Amazon.com   Amazon.co.uk   Paperback
 

Tides (Time of Myths: Shapeshifter Sagas Book 3)
It’s Leif’s eighth summer going viking with his father on their ship the Kraken—and he’s had enough. For as long as Leif can remember, his father has claimed to be a descendant of Ægir, god of the sea, and has exploited their shape changing ability—all this to amass enough gold to gain entrance into the ocean god’s halls. Leif hopes that time’s drawing near so he can free himself from Ragna’s domineering shadow.

On the green hills of Éire, Eilish is content learning traditional folk cures from her father until a Finn-Gall raid disturbs the peace. Desperate to protect Eilish from harm, her father cuts her hair and disguises her in his old clothing before she’s ripped from the only home she’s ever known. Sold as a thrall in Duiblinn, she must hide out as a young man on a ship full of barbarians.

Now Eilish, who fears she’ll become Ægir’s next sacrifice, and Leif, who isn’t prepared to stand up against his father’s powerful wrath, must face the tides of change—no matter how ominous they may seem.

**CONTENT WARNING: Due to mature content, recommended for readers aged 18+**

Available to buy from....
Amazon.com   Amazon.co.uk    Paperback


About the author:
Natasha was born in Nevada City, California. Being an only child, she resorted to using her imagination while exploring the forest surrounding her home (a nasty habit she hasn’t been able to break). Her natural interest in fantasy ignited when her parents read The Hobbit to her as a youth, and from then on anything seemed possible. Once awarded with a Hershey’s bar ‘the size of a Buick’ in her high school English class for creative writing, her passion and interest in literature has never dimmed.

She now lives in Littleton, Colorado, with her husband, two children, and two dogs.

Find the author on the following sites...

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review 2017-08-31 13:16
Book Review - Outsider (Time of Myths: Shapeshifter Sagas Book 4) by Natasha S Brown
Outsider (Time of Myths: Shapeshifter Sagas) - Natasha Brown

Another winner in the enjoyable 14th Century Shapeshifter Sagas.  A beautiful story full of charm that took hold of my imagination straight away.  The magnetism in each of these stories seem to have me transfixed when I read them, they seem so real.  Each are absolutely stand alone reads so there is nothing to be missed just reading one, although I think you will want to read them all, I am totally loving all of them and can't wait for the next one already! 

Kristie is widowed and living with her brother, Domnall, and his pregnant wife, Jean on their farm.  There is extreme worry for Domnall and his friend who are late returning from a fishing trip, along with the enormous backlog of work that has yet to be done on the farm.  Kristie, on searching for her brother, ends up finding an unclothed injured man on the shores, an outsider, who doesn't seem to know who or where he is. They take him in to aide his recovery and he soon starts to help them out on the farm while Domnall is still missing.  He starts to make a close connection with Kristie and a friendship with loveable young Jock, who lives with his aunt and uncle in the farm next door.

Jock's father died in battle, he believes his mom to be living in the ocean as a 'selkie', a grey seal who looks for love as a human form but the call of the ocean is always so strong it wins out. Obviously everyone thinks this is one of the youngsters well thought out stories but there could be so much more truth in this than everyone believes.

Who is this outsider and what has happened to Domnall and his friend?  Is there a connection or just pure coincidence?

Another fascinating tale to escape into from this author, it pulled me in and towards the end had my heart fluttering wondering what would happen.  I really enjoy the flow of the authors writing which just enhances the story.  Outsider left me feeling happy and lucky to have been able to read it.  Next please!!

 

https://beckvalleybooks.blogspot.co.uk/2017/08/book-review-outsider-time-of-myths.html 

Source: beckvalleybooks.blogspot.co.uk/2017/08/book-review-outsider-time-of-myths.html
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review 2017-04-18 22:32
Laughs and Tears – Review for Outsider by Becca Campbell @beccajcampbell
Outsider: The Flawed Series Book Two (Volume 2) - Becca J. Campbell,Jessie Sanders,Steven Novak

Becca Campbell hooked me with Empath, The Flawed Series Book I, and I was super excited when a won a copy of The Outsider, Book II.

 

 

I am always interested in who does covers for the stories I love to read.

Great job, Steven Novak. Hop on over and check him out.

 

Outsider (Flawed, #2)

 

Amazon  /  Goodreads

 

MY REVIEW

 

Becca Campbell has outdone herself with the fabulous Flawed Series and Outsider, Book II, just keeps me craving more. If you love to get lost in magical realism, where the characters tug at your heartstrings and you feel their pain, you will want these books on your reading list.

 

All his life, Josh felt like an Outsider.

 

Why were Josh’s family and friends empowered with supernatural abilities and not him? As many supernatural books as I have read, I think he is being saved for something special. Am I right? I shall have to read on to find out and so will you.

 

Alex came into his life. Her mom was too busy for her, her friends…out of sight, out of mind, so it’s time to make new ones. She’s not a plain Jane, she just doesn’t feel the need for makeup and likes her casual clothes. Alex gets along well with men and has few women friends. That makes it easy for me to relate to her, because I am the same way.

 

When Nic met Alex, it wasn’t what he anticipated and I love it. His power of captivation didn’t work this time. LOL When he poured water over his eyes, I laughed even louder.

Ah…young love and longing.

 

We have college teenagers, hanging out, some of them in a band, some of them with superpowers. It starts out with teenage angst and doesn’t take long for some action and danger to rear its ugly head.

 

Alex had no idea she had made an enemy and I see big trouble on the horizon.

 

OH MAN Becca! WTF are you doing? How could you? And, as if it wasn’t already bad enough…THE DOOR!

 

The blend of reality and fantasy, with engrossing characters who are growing and developing, becoming more complex as the story unfolds, ramps up to a white knuckle ending and I must have more. 

Animated Animals. Pictures, Images and Photos  5 Stars

 

READ MORE HERE

 

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Source: www.fundinmental.com/laughs-and-tears-review-for-outsider-by-becca-campbell-beccajcampbell
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text 2017-03-23 05:49
Outsider (Exodus End World Tour) - Olivia Cunning,Joe Arden,Mackenzie Cartwright

I didn’t realize this was about gay men and bisexual people. I have gay and bisexual friends but I don’t really want to read a romance about them. It just wasn’t my type of story if I can still review this without a rating I will as I didn’t read very far before I realized this story just wasn’t for me.

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review 2017-01-27 15:02
Sister Outsider
Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches - Audre Lorde

his book is everything. It's been slow going to figure out how to review it or just talk about it. It just has everything in here from systemic issues in government and society to systemic issues within feminism itself.

I'd been meaning to read Sister Outsider for a while but kept putting it off until I made it my Letter S read for Litsy A to Z. That's the beauty of reading challenges, they make you actually sit down and decide that now is when I'm going to read this or that book that I'd been meaning to pick up.

I was a little underwhelmed by the first essay, which is mostly about a visit to Russia. What I did appreciate about this was the acknowledgement that communism isn't the answer either. Capitalism has many issues, but I'm hardpressed to consider them lesser problems to communism, but maybe that just where I lean right.

After the essay on Russia, every essay got me more pumped. It was the perfect book to be reading while gearing up for the women's march last weekend. There were so many lines and paragraphs that have given language to things I was seeing but not quite able to fully digest, like this one:

Some problems we share as women, some we do not. You fear your children will grow up to join the patriarchy and testify against you, we fear our children will be dragged from a car and shot down in the street, and you will turn your backs upon the reasons they are dying.

It is so powerful. And it's like this over and over again with different topics.

The essay about raising a son echoed many of my own concerns about my son, who is only 6 now. I took him with me to the women's march and I hope that he's glad he went when he's old enough to understand what we were doing there. It's a concern that he'll not see it when he gets older (unless we've somehow reached equality by then but I don't see it as likely) but I am certainly less worried about the things that she is. It's a contrast that must be remembered when we choose what to take a stand.

Much of the book brings about questions about how the treatment women of color. It makes me more aware of the fact that sometimes I could hurt things when I'm trying to help. It's a reminder not to speak for women of color but to find ways to propel their voices.

It did tweak me a bit that Lorde consistently neglected to capitalize America, but I get it. By tweak, I do not mean annoy. It's a style choice and it makes it's own statement. It did it's job to demonstrate the demotion in importance of the country as opposed to the black population, as she consistently capitalized Black when talking about the population. I understand it, though you can see that I can't quite bring myself to do it. It is one of the subtleties of an essay written by a poet.

As mentioned in my TTT on Tuesday, I already know that this is one of those books whose sentiments will not leave me any time soon. Since the first time I poked a toe into the world of what feminist politics mean and what they mean to me, the divide between white feminists and black feminists has been a point of contemplation and discussion. The terms perturb me and I more often call myself an intersectional feminist, since I am neither black nor completely white and my ideals don't completely line up with either. As Lorde indicates, though, we do not have to completely agree on all problems, how to handle them, or how to prioritize them in order for us all to work together as feminists. But we do need to remember both our differences and our similarities to do this adequately.

It's hard to have a "favorite part" in a book like this, but it is this paragraph that my mind keeps coming back to as the sentiment that I've seen in many places about integrating the rest of the population with the white feminists that seem to so often forget everyone else in their climb to parity with men:

You do not have to be me in order for us to fight alongside each other. I do not have to be you to recognize that our wars are the same. What we must do is commit ourselves to some future that can include each other and to work toward that future with the particular strengths of our individual identities. And in order to do this, we must allow each other our differences at the same time as we recognize our sameness.

Given the many women of color that I saw in DC on Saturday, I hope that we are already doing that. But I know in herstory that women of color help to propel the voice for the cause and then get shut out of it once the men are at the table to negotiate. We must not let it happen again.

This is one of those books that all feminists must read, that women in general should read, and that would be a great addition to any course, conference, or book club or anything on social justice in general or feminism specifically.

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