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review 2018-04-06 04:03
Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach by Kelly Robson
Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach - Kelly Robson

Our 80-something main character, Minh, is an ecologist bidding on a project to do an ecological survey in the past (approx 2000 BCE) in a future about 250 years from now where humans have just started to reclaim the surface of the Earth. Medical technology is quite advanced, so I'm not sure how much like an 80-year old she actually looks (maybe she'd pass for 50-60?), but it wasn't so advanced to avoid the plague that cost her her legs (the reason she walks around on six prosthetic tentacle-legs).

 

This was interesting, but it took half the novella just to build the team and the proposal and get to the past, and I wasn't sure how I felt about Kiki and what she did. I would be curious enough to look into other things that Kelly Robson has written, however. I hadn't read her before. She is Canadian, though, which is always a plus (I know there are lots of Canadian authors, but sometimes it feels like they're drowned out by everyone else even in Canada). Minh is based in Calgary, naturally. Or the hab that is located on what used to be Calgary and is thus called Calgary.

 

There is a double narrative thread that is weaved throughout (starting each chapter) that only pays off towards the end, but I'm not sure I liked it enough to reread it just to appreciate that part more.

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text 2018-04-02 02:55
Library Books, Updated
The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines - Shohreh Aghdashloo
The Boat People - Sharon Bala
Northwest Garden Manifesto: Create, Restore, and Maintain a Sustainable Yard - John Albers,David F. Perry
Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach - Kelly Robson
Six Wakes - Mur Lafferty
New York 2140 - Kim Stanley Robinson
Crash Override: How Gamergate (Nearly) Destroyed My Life, and How We Can Win the Fight Against Online Hate - Zoe Quinn
My Favorite Thing Is Monsters - Emil Ferris
Akata Witch - Nnedi Okorafor
In Other Lands - Sarah Rees Brennan,Carolyn Nowak

Checked Out

The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines - Shohreh Aghdashloo (DUE 04-13-18)

The Boat People - Sharon Bala  (DUE 04-27-18)

Northwest Garden Manifesto: Create, Restore, and Maintain a Sustainable Yard - John Albers, David F. Perry (DUE 05-04-18)

Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach - Kelly Robson  (DUE 05-10-18)

 

On Hold

New York 2140 - Kim Stanley Robinson   (In Transit)

Six Wakes - Mur Lafferty   (1 of 1 holds)

Crash Override: How Gamergate (Nearly) Destroyed My Life, and How We Can Win the Fight Against Online Hate - Zoe Quinn  (1 of 1 holds)

Akata Witch - Nnedi Okorafor  (1 of 1 holds) 

In Other Lands - Sarah Rees Brennan,Carolyn Nowak  (1 of 1 holds)

My Favorite Thing Is Monsters - Emil Ferris   (2 of 2 holds)

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text 2018-03-25 21:30
Reading progress update: I've read 304 out of 304 pages.
Ain't She a Peach - Molly Harper
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text 2018-03-24 21:46
Reading progress update: I've read 40 out of 304 pages.
Ain't She a Peach - Molly Harper

I'm looking forward to this and I'm ready for something contemporary and I enjoyed the first book in the series 

 

Image result for fun gif

 

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review 2018-03-22 23:24
Review: Peach
Peach - Emma Glass

Ah, sweet, sweet, sweet Peach. So short. So sweet. So blunted. So cloying. Maybe it's an acquired taste.

Emma Glass's very original novella Peach is truly unlike anything I've read before. On one hand, it is rich, full of alliteration and word play. The use of language is done with great skill. This is a very poetic story, but unlike some other works of “prose” I've read that felt more like poetry than prose, Peach is merely a very poetic story. From the publisher's description and the opening pages, I expected something along these lines. What I did not expect was the intense surrealism and the black comedy. This is a strange book with some very uncomfortable moments. At times I think it works. At other times, I'm not convinced.

One thing that was very difficult for me to accept was the depiction of characters as objects. Most of these characters are foods including a man made of sausage. Mr. Custard, for instance, truly takes the shape of custard: he is a gelatinous mass of sweetness who must pick himself up from the floor occasionally and take shape. Spud is a giant potato who rolls everywhere. Peach, Sandy, Spud, Mr. Custard, Hair Netty, Green... At first I imagined these characters as Glass described them, but eventually, they took a new shape. I couldn't help but think of Mr. Men and Little Miss and once the image was in my head, there was no replacing it. So imagine Mr. Bump and Little Miss Star, driving around in Murakami-inspired cars with sushi rolls for wheels. That is how I will remember Peach.
Characters from Roger Hargreaves' Mr. Men and Little Miss series

Peach is also disturbing. Imagine Mr. Tickle and Little Miss Contrary slashing at one another, trouncing one another, devouring one another in all its visceral cartoonishness. Which leaves me with some questions. Is the surrealist style meant to soften the blow of the violence? Does this ridiculous presentation dull too much the impact of serious subjects? Peach is an uncomfortable story, but how much more uncomfortable could it have been had Glass refrained from her otherwise Saturday morning vibe? It's this presentation that ultimately makes Peach forgettable, a story beautifully rendered, but void of so much potential anguish.

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